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    if today the temperature is 0 degrees centigrade, and tomorrow it will be twice as cold, what temperature will it be tomorrow ???

    i couldnt find an answer to this, maybe you could ???
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    -1 degrees?

    ....don't ask me
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    there isn't an answer
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    Convert into Farenheit?
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    -8.9
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    (Original post by kornkamper)
    if today the temperature is 0 degrees centigrade, and tomorrow it will be twice as cold, what temperature will it be tomorrow ???

    i couldnt find an answer to this, maybe you could ???
    0 degrees.

    But....with more.....wind....

    I DUNNO

    I suck many muchly at riddles.
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    Either it'll be 0 (though i doubt it) or convert it into Kelvin
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    (Original post by kornkamper)
    if today the temperature is 0 degrees centigrade, and tomorrow it will be twice as cold, what temperature will it be tomorrow ???

    i couldnt find an answer to this, maybe you could ???
    This is more of a physics misconception :rolleyes:
    You have to, in simple terms, "standardise".
    0 degrees celcius = 273 Kelvins

    "twice as cold" I guess means half the temp: => 273/2 = 136.5 K,
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    (Original post by endeavour)
    This is more of a physics misconception :rolleyes:
    You have to, in simple terms, "standardise".
    0 degrees celcius = 273 Kelvins

    "twice as cold" I guess means half the temp: => 273/2 = 136.5 K
    does this mean you have to be infinity cold to be zero K?
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    you have to define cold - i.e. if u consider cold to be less than 10 degrees then twice as cold would be -10 degrees... but as there is no definition of cold, there isn't really an answer?
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    16 degrees fahrenheit or -8.8888 (recurring) centigrade. Convert 0C into fahrenheit, half it and find the centigrade equivalent. Thank you.
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    True, the weather doesn't stop doing it's thing just because humans say it can't :P
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    Sorry, some1 got there before me, hadn't refreshed page. lol.
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    Myself and Owain got it right, -8.88888 C
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    (Original post by homoterror)
    does this mean you have to be infinity cold to be zero K?
    You have to be at "absolute zero" (-273 degrees C = 0 Kelvin) (a temperature where all molecular movement stops).
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    how do you make 2,10,10 into 950???????
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    (Original post by Woodsy)
    Myself and Owain got it right, -8.88888 C
    But isn't Farenheit just just some arbitrary scale with no rhyme or reason? :confused: Why use that? :confused: :confused:
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    i agree with jamian wheres the logic in converting to that? say for example, it is 0 farenhiet do you convert to celcius and divide by two??
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    The nature of centigrade is based on freezing and boiling point of water - it was correct to convert to fahrenheit, because what can you do with 0c? The answer is nothing, but it represents 32F, so twice as cold is 16F, and if you convert that to centigrade you get -8.8888 c. Easy.
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    (Original post by DaveManUK)
    i agree with jamian wheres the logic in converting to that? say for example, it is 0 farenhiet do you convert to celcius and divide by two??
    Yeh,because the logic is you can't work with ZERO. For all units you can convert a ZERO number into another form and work it out that way. Only way it can be done.
 
 
 
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