Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    JOHANNESBURG — A gay couple in Malawi were found guilty on Tuesday of unnatural acts and gross indecency, the consequence of their holding an engagement ceremony in an insular nation where homosexuality is largely seen as nonexistent or something that must be suppressed.

    Tiwonge Chimbalanga, 33, and Steven Monjeza, 26, face up to 14 years in prison. A magistrate said he would sentence the men on Thursday.

    The case has drawn worldwide attention as another example of the broad anti-gay sentiment in Africa. A law recently proposed in Uganda calling for homosexuals to be executed in some cases stirred so much ire in the West that a presidential committee recommended withdrawing it from Parliament.

    Malawi, a deeply impoverished, landlocked nation of 14 million, has also received international condemnation for prosecuting the two gay men. But most of its leaders — political and religious — have reacted with defiance. Last month, President Bingu wa Mutharika was quoted as calling homosexuality “evil and bad before the eyes of God” and an act “we Malawians just do not do.”

    Magistrate Nyakwawa Usiwa Usiwa, in delivering Tuesday’s judgment in a small courtroom in Blantyre, the country’s commercial capital, was similarly stern. He referred to the crime as “buggery,” using language from when Malawi was a British colony and the current law was written.

    He found both men guilty of “carnal knowledge” that was “against the order of nature.” He said the two had been “living together as husband and wife,” which “transgresses the Malawian recognized standards of propriety.”

    As the judgment was translated for them from English into Chichewa, the defendants barely flinched. Then they were hastened out of a back door, escaping a taunting crowd that already was celebrating their conviction.

    The couple have been in jail since Dec. 28, two days after they threw themselves an engagement party — a chinkhoswe in Chichewa — at the Blantyre lodge where Mr. Chimbalanga worked as a cook and housekeeper, referring to himself as “Auntie Tiwo” and insisting that he was a woman.

    This public celebration drew dozens of uninvited guests. Some hooted and jeered, and at least one phoned a local newspaper, which published a front-page article about “gay lovebirds” partaking in “the first recorded public activity for homosexuals in the country.”

    When arrested, both men gave statements to the police that were later deemed incriminating. Though a doctor testified he could find no evidence that the two had committed sodomy, the magistrate said he relied on the defendants’ own words “that they used to caress each other and had anal sex for five months before going public.”

    The verdict was a disappointment to the few Malawians who had openly supported the accused. “As much as I expected a guilty verdict, I still hoped for a miracle,” said Dunker Kamba, the administrator for a group that provides counseling about AIDS.

    Undule Mwakasungula, the head of a human rights group, called the verdict another sign of the country’s rejection of what is commonly called “gayism” in Malawi. He said, “We can’t keep denying that we have gay people in Malawi and that they deserve to be treated with understanding and justice.”

    Mr. Monjeza grew up on the outskirts of Blantyre. His relatives repeatedly have said they feel disgraced and would never welcome him back.

    Mr. Chimbalanga was raised in a small village beyond the huge tea plantations that dominate the Thyolo district, 40 miles from Blantyre. His uncle, the village headman, banished him in his teenage years, but his five siblings remained loyal, thinking their brother “bewitched.” At the end of the proceedings on Tuesday, Mauya Msuku, a lawyer for the defense, said the gay couple suffered from “gender disorientation” and would benefit far more from forgiveness and counseling than “placing them with hard-core criminals.”

    Speaking for the prosecution, however, Barbara Mchenga urged the magistrate to “consider the scar this offense will leave on our morality. The two showed no remorse and were somehow proud of what they did.”

    Caroline Somanje contributed reporting from Blantyre, Malawi.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/19/wo...wi.html?src=me

    The Czech Republic condemns this act of repression and homophobic nonsense.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mr_Spoof)
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/19/wo...wi.html?src=me

    The Czech Republic condemns this act of repression and homophobic nonsense.
    Nigeria would like to remind the representative from the Czech Republic that not every country holds your view of rights.
    In our continent homosexuality is unnatural and thus is treated as so.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Portugal is dismayed and disappointed by this decision.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Germany and Austria both feel that each country has its own culture and thinking. No one can change this. We just have to hope that countries and their people become more liberal in their thinking. Please note that USA and UK were also against homosexuality in the past, however, with time views change. Just give it time.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jakemittle)
    Nigeria would like to remind the representative from the Czech Republic that not every country holds your view of rights.
    The Czech Republic recognizes that other countries do have a more backward view rather than the civilized world.

    In our continent homosexuality is unnatural and thus is treated as so.
    Not according to Jacob Zuma:

    http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE64Q46420100527

    Who has quite rightly come out to condemn this atrocity.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mr_Spoof)
    The Czech Republic recognizes that other countries do have a more backward view rather than the civilized world.



    Not according to Jacob Zuma:

    http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE64Q46420100527

    Who has quite rightly come out to condemn this atrocity.
    Backwards? Sorry, Nigeria does recognize that other countries do not share the same morals and would rather let go of them for the "civilized world". What a statement..from a country in which 63% are against gay adoption and only 1% separates voters in terms of same sex marriage.
    People in your country clearly do view see gay people as 100% same as 'normal' people.
    Do not try and attempt to take the "high group" when your own country has issues concerning this topic.

    In light of this source Nigeria retracts its statement that the whole continent sees this as unnatural.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jakemittle)
    Backwards? Sorry, Nigeria does recognize that other countries do not share the same morals and would rather let go of them for the "civilized world". What a statement..from a country in which 63% are against gay adoption and only 1% separates voters in terms of same sex marriage.
    People in your country clearly do view see gay people as 100% same as 'normal' people.
    Do not try and attempt to take the "high group" when your own country has issues concerning this topic.

    High ground?
    This from a country where some of it's people thought a goat committed an armed robbery :lol:

    As for your other points:

    1) At least the Czech republic is not arresting and charging homosexuals for their sexuality and for wanting to marry. At least the Czech Republic has no laws allowing

    2) In the Czech Republic homosexual sex was legalized in 1962. So it's been legal a long time.

    3) The age of consent was equalized in 1990 (15, before it was 18 for homosexuals).

    4) The Army doesn't question the sexual orientation of soldiers, and allows homosexuals to serve openly. Homosexual prostitution was decriminalized in 1990.

    5) The good people of the Czech Republic have generally are socially liberal to homosexuality since 1989.



    In a poll about Czechs support for gay rights.

    When asked:

    ""registered partnerships"


    In 2005 62% said yes.

    Since then it has gone up and last year in a poll 73% said yes they support it.


    On "same-sex marriages" :

    In 2005 42% said yes they support it. in 2009 it was 47%.


    So the Czech Republic is well and truly taking steps socially and culturally to accepting homosexuality.

    Which is more than can be said for certain African nations.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mr_Spoof)
    High ground?
    This from a country where some of it's people thought a goat committed an armed robbery :lol:

    As for your other points:

    1) At least the Czech republic is not arresting and charging homosexuals for their sexuality and for wanting to marry. At least the Czech Republic has no laws allowing

    2) In the Czech Republic homosexual sex was legalized in 1962. So it's been legal a long time.

    3) The age of consent was equalized in 1990 (15, before it was 18 for homosexuals).

    4) The Army doesn't question the sexual orientation of soldiers, and allows homosexuals to serve openly. Homosexual prostitution was decriminalized in 1990.

    5) The good people of the Czech Republic have generally are socially liberal to homosexuality since 1989.



    In a poll about Czechs support for gay rights.

    When asked:

    ""registered partnerships"


    In 2005 62% said yes.

    Since then it has gone up and last year in a poll 73% said yes they support it.


    On "same-sex marriages" :

    In 2005 42% said yes they support it. in 2009 it was 47%.


    So the Czech Republic is well and truly taking steps socially and culturally to accepting homosexuality.

    Which is more than can be said for certain African nations.

    Well, at least our people have some sense of humour!...This kind of humour that you will not find in Europe. But at least we do not do sick things to our fellow brothers and sisters, such as eating each other.

    Your country is taking steps towards acknowledging unnatural acts, but that is your country. You have the sovereign right to do as you wish, however our country will govern with our morals and not allow such profanity to be legalised.

    In South Africa, Zuma commends what happened in Malawi, but is South Africa tolerant and open about homosexuality?..Nigeria believes that the representative from the Czech Republic will find it not be the case.
    • Wiki Support Team
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Wiki Support Team
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/10194057.stm

    The SGs office welcomes the news that the two gay men jailed in Malawi have been pardoned and released.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Germany and Austria welcomes the news of the pardon too.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    The Netherlands was most delighted to receive news of the pardon
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jakemittle)
    Well, at least our people have some sense of humour!...This kind of humour that you will not find in Europe. But at least we do not do sick things to our fellow brothers and sisters, such as eating each other.

    Your country is taking steps towards acknowledging unnatural acts, but that is your country. You have the sovereign right to do as you wish, however our country will govern with our morals and not allow such profanity to be legalised.

    In South Africa, Zuma commends what happened in Malawi, but is South Africa tolerant and open about homosexuality?..Nigeria believes that the representative from the Czech Republic will find it not be the case.
    I echo the statements of Nigeria. Morality and legality are not absolute but are relative and to think those who differ are "backwards" would make everyone on earth "backwards".
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by In2deep)
    I echo the statements of Nigeria. Morality and legality are not absolute but are relative and to think those who differ are "backwards" would make everyone on earth "backwards".
    When a culture and society arrests people merely for their sexual desires and sexual preference does the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria not think that such actions are somewhat undemocratic and socially wrong?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mr_Spoof)
    When a culture and society arrests people merely for their sexual desires and sexual preference does the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria not think that such actions are somewhat undemocratic and socially wrong?
    Majority of the people in countries may not support homosexuality. It is still the position in countries such as Kenya and India. If someone is caught indulging in these acts, they can be criminally prosecuted, and beaten up by the people of the country. So even though developing countries may now support homosexuality, developing countries have not yet matured in their views todays it, so they can not be labelled undemocratic and socially wrong, since the majority in the country do not support it.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jakemittle)
    Well, at least our people have some sense of humour!...This kind of humour that you will not find in Europe. But at least we do not do sick things to our fellow brothers and sisters, such as eating each other.
    :facepalm:

    Unless you can show that it is common in the Czech Republic culturally and legal and that it is enjoyed by many then you can't really say that as a country people generally enjoy eating each other now can we?

    :rolleyes:

    Epic, epic fail.

    Where as comparitively, the law forbidding homosexual marriage is exactly that. Law. Therefore as a country they have more to answer for, (especially in terms of critisism) for bringing people to trial over this sort of thing.

    How can this country, it's laws and way of life not expect critisism over this law?

    Your country is taking steps towards acknowledging unnatural acts,
    :lol: What's that phrase? People in glass houses....something...something.

    What pray tell "unnatural acts" are these then? Please don't use the cannibal argument, that was such a weak argument.



    In South Africa, Zuma commends what happened in Malawi, but is South Africa tolerant and open about homosexuality?..Nigeria believes that the representative from the Czech Republic will find it not be the case.
    True that South Africa is far from tolerant.
    The rep for Czech Republic never claimed it was. However it is at least condemnation from another African nation.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mr_Spoof)
    When a culture and society arrests people merely for their sexual desires and sexual preference does the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria not think that such actions are somewhat undemocratic and socially wrong?
    Democracy itself has limits and exceptions. There is not a single government in the world that operates or allows total "freedom of speech" or total "freedom of belief". The limitations to those great principles should only be imposed by judging the collective moral view of the countries citizens. Fortunately or unfortunately, depending on your view, large parts of the world still deem homosexuality "wrong".


    OOC: I think this is Algeria's stance given that 99.7% of the population are Muslims and that sodomy is forbidden (therefore homosexuality) but it is also a democracy It is illegal not sure if it is actually enforced though.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Portugal is glad they were pardoned.
 
 
 
Poll
Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.