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    May I ask how u guys view the econ department at Durham? I'm very happy that I got an offer but my fd told me that Economics at Durham is not as gd as its other departments since it involves very little metrics. Any former or current economics student can giv me a help plssss
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    The Economics course at Durahm is not on par with unis rated the same level. The fact it doesn't offer an Msc in Economics says all it needs to. If you're looking for an economics course that will prepare you for an Msc at a top uni then Durham might not be the best option however if you're looking for employment Durham is top class.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    The Economics course at Durahm is not on par with unis rated the same level. The fact it doesn't offer an Msc in Economics says all it needs to. If you're looking for an economics course that will prepare you for an Msc at a top uni then Durham might not be the best option however if you're looking for employment Durham is top class.
    Why Durham is not a good option for a MSC then? Is there any reason for it?
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    (Original post by YhA_kaede)
    Why Durham is not a good option for a MSC then? Is there any reason for it?
    Not enough maths and econometrics in the undergrad course.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Not enough maths and econometrics in the undergrad course.
    May I ask usually how many modules will be for maths n metrics in a top uni?

    I've seen there is one in maths module(20pt) in yr1, 1 metric (20pt)in yr2 n 1 metric(20pt) in yr3.
    Btw, since there are some free modules that I can choose outside econs(40pt in yr1, 20pt in yr2 n 20pt in yr3), I may choose from the Maths department n will it help on my further study?
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    (Original post by YhA_kaede)
    May I ask usually how many modules will be for maths n metrics in a top uni?

    I've seen there is one in maths module(20pt) in yr1, 1 metric (20pt)in yr2 n 1 metric(20pt) in yr3.
    Btw, since there are some free modules that I can choose outside econs(40pt in yr1, 20pt in yr2 n 20pt in yr3), I may choose from the Maths department n will it help on my further study?
    It's not just about the amount of modules but what is taught in them. A lot of will be because most people at top unis will have Maths A level and Further Maths so their modules will cover much harder mathematical concepts.

    Going by module descriptions.

    Year 1 module - Basic Maths and Stats (certainly in the terms of Maths the top unis assume this knowledge)
    Year 2 module - Basic Econometrics ( Generally the stuff most unis would cover)
    Year 3 module - 'Applied' Econometrics is relatively easy and won't cover much additional theory

    Since these are the only Maths and Econometric module available its safe to say Durham Economics isn't particularly good prep for Msc level since they cover no Linear Algebra across 3 years which means no matrix algebra used in econometrics, which is very crucial to any real and useful metrics modules, only 3 mathematical modules offered across 3 years and no modules that deal with econometric theory.

    If you compare it to another uni ranked with it they will at least offer more advanced modules. You could take modules from the maths dept but beware it's usually a nightmare when you have to take into account timetable, prerequisites and such.

    Despite what I've said I don't think the Durham course is 'bad', I think they probably have a strong macro/Micro emphasis and seeing their modules it would seem they offer a decent variety. But if you planned to do an Msc at a top uni you're going to get a big maths wake up call :p:.
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    (Original post by YhA_kaede)
    .
    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    The Economics course at Durahm is not on par with unis rated the same level. The fact it doesn't offer an Msc in Economics says all it needs to. If you're looking for an economics course that will prepare you for an Msc at a top uni then Durham might not be the best option however if you're looking for employment Durham is top class.
    First, your claim that the economics course at Durham is not 'on par' with unis at the same level is actually quite insulting. Durham economists are very strong and competitive, and do very well in finance/public sector/actuarial jobs - they can easily hold their own against economists from all universities.

    I agree that Durham isn't really focused on econometrics. You are awarded a BA; however, having taken a fairly mathematical route (and am currently doing a module from the MSc Economics and Finance course they do) through the degree, I can tell you that there is a substantial amount of quantitative material should you chose there to be, especially in your final year, where you can specialise. I know graduates who have gone on to do MSc study in LSE etc, and they have coped fine. If you want an econometrics course, then Durham is not for you - it is excellent at economics, however.

    This is coming from a finalist who took further maths, physics and economics for A level, so with a strong quantitative background.
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    (Original post by chidona)
    First, your claim that the economics course at Durham is not 'on par' with unis at the same level is actually quite insulting. Durham economists are very strong and competitive, and do very well in finance/public sector/actuarial jobs - they can easily hold their own against economists from all universities.

    I agree that Durham isn't really focused on econometrics. You are awarded a BA; however, having taken a fairly mathematical route (and am currently doing a module from the MSc Economics and Finance course they do) through the degree, I can tell you that there is a substantial amount of quantitative material should you chose there to be, especially in your final year, where you can specialise. I know graduates who have gone on to do MSc study in LSE etc, and they have coped fine. If you want an econometrics course, then Durham is not for you - it is excellent at economics, however.

    This is coming from a finalist who took further maths, physics and economics for A level, so with a strong quantitative background.
    I think this is a good post for the OP because as I said before I was basing my analysis on their course outline and things such a taking modules from the Msc course isn't something someone out of the loop would know. When I said it wasn't on par I meant in terms of maths. The maths on an economics course is usually the difference between top unis and ones that aren't ranked so highly, this is generally the most objective way to compare content of degree courses.

    I believe someone from Durham could handle an Msc at LSE but it's likely they would have to put in more work than someone from LSE/Warwick/Cambridge. You'd have to essentially teach yourself Linear Algebra in the context on Econometrics whilst those at the unis I stated above would have covered it, in the case of LSE their metric module in year 3 is about the most advanced a module you can get at undergrad.

    In terms of Durham economists, they are strong in all the careers you talked about but I am not referring to careers. If someone had a keen interest in pursing research in economics they would be better of going to a uni that offered more advanced econometric modules or taking up as many maths modules as they could. It's unfortunate but to be a considered a good researcher in economics your mathematical skills have to be top notch due to the rigour of models these days.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    I think this is a good post for the OP because as I said before I was basing my analysis on their course outline and things such a taking modules from the Msc course isn't something someone out of the loop would know. When I said it wasn't on par I meant in terms of maths. The maths on an economics course is usually the difference between top unis and ones that aren't ranked so highly, this is generally the most objective way to compare content of degree courses.

    I believe someone from Durham could handle an Msc at LSE but it's likely they would have to put in more work than someone from LSE/Warwick/Cambridge. You'd have to essentially teach yourself Linear Algebra in the context on Econometrics whilst those at the unis I stated above would have covered it, in the case of LSE their metric module in year 3 is about the most advanced a module you can get at undergrad.

    In terms of Durham economists, they are strong in all the careers you talked about but I am not referring to careers. If someone had a keen interest in pursing research in economics they would be better of going to a uni that offered more advanced econometric modules or taking up as many maths modules as they could. It's unfortunate but to be a considered a good researcher in economics your mathematical skills have to be top notch due to the rigour of models these days.
    Honestly, without seeing the module content for LSE MSc Economics course I wouldn't be able to say whether a Durham graduate would have to work harder or not; my intuition is that they'd be on an equal footing for the fundamentals, if a little behind on more advanced specialised econometrics. For a full comparison, I would compare the 'Econometrics' (third year) module and 'Intermediate Methods for Economics and Finance' (second year) module with those provided by equivalent universities, and look at the assumed knowledge of the LSE course.

    I disagree strongly with you about research. It's essential you have a good grasp of mathematics, however there is a substantial literature in economics that focuses on analytical, as opposed to statistical, skills; for example, health economics. Whilst econometrics is used to examine specific hypothesis and relationships, there is a substantial quantity of policy appraisal using descriptive statistics and conventional economic analysis. It would therefore depend on what the individual wished to research - even so, an economics degree from Durham is not a dead end; however I would admit that it is not the first place to look for someone who is more interested in econometrics and biased towards pure quantitative analysis.
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    I deny all notions of objectivity.

    Also, does anyone do anything remotely interesting from a qualitative perspective or are you still all statsy pointy-heads?
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    Isn't the Economics course BA through tradition?
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    (Original post by arkbar)
    I deny all notions of objectivity.

    Also, does anyone do anything remotely interesting from a qualitative perspective or are you still all statsy pointy-heads?
    Sorry those who like to right about their feelings go to the left. We'll be doing some proofs over here.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Sorry those who like to right about their feelings go to the left. We'll be doing some proofs over here.
    We also like to wrong about our feelings.
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    (Original post by arkbar)
    We also like to wrong about our feelings.
    Boy I really wish I did your kind of blog..I mean degree. :cry:
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    (Original post by chidona)
    This is coming from a finalist who took further maths, physics and economics for A level, so with a strong quantitative background.
    Reli appreciated for a reply from current student in Durham

    May I ask if u mean u can do module from the Msc course?:eek: Would u mind to tell me abit more abt it as it seems not an usual case for an BA to study any Msc module, many thanks for any details.
    (Original post by chidona)
    Honestly, without seeing the module content for LSE MSc Economics course I wouldn't be able to say whether a Durham graduate would have to work harder or not; my intuition is that they'd be on an equal footing for the fundamentals, if a little behind on more advanced specialised econometrics. For a full comparison, I would compare the 'Econometrics' (third year) module and 'Intermediate Methods for Economics and Finance' (second year) module with those provided by equivalent universities, and look at the assumed knowledge of the LSE course.
    Do u mean "Applied econometrics" for the "Economrtrics"[third year] module as I dun find it in the prospectus: http://www.dur.ac.uk/resources/facul...works/l100.pdf

    Many, many thanks for your reply.
    PS: May I ask if there is any specific A-level requirement for any modules especially those more quantitative one?
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    Would you guys prefer to do Economics at York, Bristol or Durham?
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    (Original post by agolati)
    Would you guys prefer to do Economics at York, Bristol or Durham?
    Same question for me last month and I chose to apply for Durham n Bristol, but not York.

    I am not sure if Durham or Bristol is better but they both seem better than York from the view of international student(ok, I mean Hong Kong)
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    (Original post by agolati)
    Would you guys prefer to do Economics at York, Bristol or Durham?
    If I wanted to go into research or do an Msc at a top uni I would choose Bristol first then York, otherwise, I would go for Durham.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Boy I really wish I did your kind of blog..I mean degree. :cry:
    Sozatron, I have an MSc from the Imperial Civil Engineering dept. too, quant enough for you?
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    (Original post by arkbar)
    Sozatron, I have an MSc from Imperial Civil Engineering dept. too, quant enough for you?
    Have a cookie. :cookie:
 
 
 
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