Questions on post-grad study at Oxbridge Watch

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Radagasty
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#21
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#21
(Original post by hildabeast)
Yes, references are more important, as well as the quality of the academic papers you've had published. I kmnow someone from a poorer Australian university than yours who is currently doing a DPhil.
Are prospective PhD/DPhil students generally expected to have published papers? I am the co-author of a paper in progress, and first author of several poster presentations at conferences and so forth, but I haven't actually published in any journal. Do British undergrads usually submit papers for publication?

Just out of curiosity, how much do Britons generally know about Australian universities?

(Original post by hildabeast)
As far as colleges go, it depends whether you want to mix with undergraduates or not. Whoever said that graduates in undergraduate colleges tend to have stayed on after their first degree was wrong - this hardly ever happens. Oh, and there are two graduate students on my rowing crew, so they are pretty involved.
I wonder to what extent this depends on the college. I have an acquaintance who did his undergrad at Oriel (Oxon.) and then his PhD at St Catz. (Cantab.), and he said that the undergrads and grads were much better integrated in the former.
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J.S.
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#22
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(Original post by Radagasty)
Are prospective PhD/DPhil students generally expected to have published papers? I am the co-author of a paper in progress, and first author of several poster presentations at conferences and so forth, but I haven't actually published in any journal. Do British undergrads usually submit papers for publication?

Just out of curiosity, how much do Britons generally know about Australian universities?



I wonder to what extent this depends on the college. I have an acquaintance who did his undergrad at Oriel (Oxon.) and then his PhD at St Catz. (Cantab.), and he said that the undergrads and grads were much better integrated in the former.
As for publications, no. It's expected that you can identify potential which leads to suggest you will be published. Which can be sufficiently demonstrated through a first class honours/with a first on your dissertation at a well respected university. This is enough for entry onto almost *any* UK MPhil/PhD, providing you have excellent references and you've ideally finished somwhere near the top 5 in your department.

As for Aus universities, they're not so well known in the UK. People tend to take the arrogant view that only American/Brit. education is worth anything! Although, the more broadminded do not make such ignorant assumptions. You'll probably encounter both views whilst youre at university here, more of the latter thankfully.
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Radagasty
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#23
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(Original post by J.S.)
As for publications, no. It's expected that you can identify potential which leads to suggest you will be published. Which can be sufficiently demonstrated through a first class honours/with a first on your dissertation at a well respected university. This is enough for entry onto almost *any* UK MPhil/PhD, providing you have excellent references and you've ideally finished somwhere near the top 5 in your department.
It thought so... it's just that Hildabeast mentioned the quality of published papers as an important criterion for postgrad admission.

(Original post by J.S.)
As for Aus universities, they're not so well known in the UK. People tend to take the arrogant view that only American/Brit. education is worth anything! Although, the more broadminded do not make such ignorant assumptions. You'll probably encounter both views whilst youre at university here, more of the latter thankfully.
I suspected as much... Australian universities aren't really all that well known around the world. Most people have heard of the University of Sydney, the oldest and most prestigious in Australia, but that's about it. Mention the University of New South Wales, and people go 'huh?' It is partly this attitude you mention which led me to apply to Cambridge to read for a PhD. (Though the level of research conducted there is at undoubtedly a much higher level, both in intensity and in quality, than my home institution here in Australia.)
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Saxman
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#24
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Mmm. What is the teaching post-grads like? Do they have the same tutorial system that undergrad has? I am not sure about the rankings at post-grad level, but is Oxbridge still the number 1 or is LSE considered better for economics?
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musicbloke
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#25
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(Original post by J.S.)
top 5 in your department.
even if you've studied at oxbridge for UG?
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eht5677
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#26
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(Original post by Saxman)
Mmm. What is the teaching post-grads like? Do they have the same tutorial system that undergrad has? I am not sure about the rankings at post-grad level, but is Oxbridge still the number 1 or is LSE considered better for economics?
At Cambridge, the teaching varies depending on the course being taken e.g. MPhil in Criminology is a taught course with a series of lectures and is assessed by essays and a small thesis whilst a PhD in the natural sciences is research based and is assessed by a thesis and a viva.

In the natural sciences there are no supervisions for graduates, I'm not able to comment on the non-scientific subjects.
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Radagasty
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#27
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(Original post by Mart21)
At Cambridge, the teaching varies depending on the course being taken e.g. MPhil in Criminology is a taught course with a series of lectures and is assessed by essays and a small thesis whilst a PhD in the natural sciences is research based and is assessed by a thesis and a viva.

In the natural sciences there are no supervisions for graduates, I'm not able to comment on the non-scientific subjects.
Are you reading for a PhD in the natural sciences at the moment? I'd be most interested in hearing from current postgrads.
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J.S.
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#28
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(Original post by Saxman)
Mmm. What is the teaching post-grads like? Do they have the same tutorial system that undergrad has? I am not sure about the rankings at post-grad level, but is Oxbridge still the number 1 or is LSE considered better for economics?
Very close, both exceptional first rate, at each, Ox, Cam and LSE. The course structures at the respective universities vary though.

All in all, LSE's Economics doctorate is prooobabbly (marginally) the most difficult to get into, exceptionally difficult.
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J.S.
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#29
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(Original post by musicboy)
even if you've studied at oxbridge for UG?

I'm sure an Oxbridge first would ensure entry. Although there seems to be a huge variation in demand for grad. level study. For Econ/International Relations/Development/Finance/Management i.e. what I've looked into, that's what's required.

I think the humanities could be easier to get into, or indeed it could just be a case of me thinkin 'grass is greener on the other side'!
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Agrippina
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#30
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Can you study post grad at Oxford if you were an undergrad there? Would having been an undergrad there make it easier to be accepted for postgrad if you got a first class degree?
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J.S.
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#31
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(Original post by Eeyore)
Can you study post grad at Oxford if you were an undergrad there? Would having been an undergrad there make it easier to be accepted for postgrad if you got a first class degree?

If you were to get a first from any of the top universities, you would be assured a place on any academic course at grad. level, providing you satisfy the course prerequisites , i.e. the certain modules you'd need to have studied. Only exception is if you apply for a doctorate directly, and are unable to find supervision. Perhaps too a few of the exceptionally competitive courses like the PhD at the LBS or something like that...
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Radagasty
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#32
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(Original post by Eeyore)
Can you study post grad at Oxford if you were an undergrad there? Would having been an undergrad there make it easier to be accepted for postgrad if you got a first class degree?
Most of the academics I've talked to have said that it is generally wise to change universities for one's postgrad studies, to expand one's horizons, as it were, even if the undergrad uni. was as illustrious as Oxford.
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