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    Don't think. It'll hurt you too much.
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    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    Hehe came to my mind first too lol.

    Err Christ Church probs.. her Tory-voting parents would approve. :top2:
    I know Balliol is paired with St John's, Cambridge which I believe is known to be full of rahs.
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    If you're writing fiction and 'Philippa' is your invention, why can't you just make up a fictional college that will suit her to a T? That would seem like a much more logical thing to do than trying to draw on existing college stereotypes. There's absolutely no reason why a fictional character would have to attend a real college anyway.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    If you're writing fiction and 'Philippa' is your invention, why can't you just make up a fictional college that will suit her to a T? That would seem like a much more logical thing to do than trying to draw on existing college stereotypes. There's absolutely no reason why a fictional character would have to attend a real college anyway.
    Unless you're writing realism, of course.
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    (Original post by Timon)
    Unless you're writing realism, of course.
    If you're writing realism, I think you need to ask yourself whether you can really justify using a character like Philippa, who is essentially just a walking, talking stereotype.:erm:
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    That would make all characterisations stereotypes then if you use your logic.
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    (Original post by Timon)
    That would make all characterisations stereotypes then if you use your logic.
    So you are using what is the most broad brush kind of stereotype (and one that is much less common than people seem to think) yet demanding 'realism'. I've yet to meet anyone at Oxford who is everything you describe.

    Will everyone in your work of fiction be attending Formal Hall in black tie every night, staying up until the early hours quaffing champagne (except on those occasions when they have to go to the races the next morning), punting and eating quails' eggs?

    You seem strangely obsessed given all your other threads that are so similar to this.
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    I'm just trying to piece together a picture--nothing more, nothing less. You don't have to get snidey and nasty. I mean no harm. As far as painting with a broad brush, that's how you begin the creative process. You wittle down to the individuality and the nuances of a character once you come to grips with a character and the broadest picture of their life.
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    Create a fictional portmanteau college, such as Tom Sharpe's 'Porterhouse' onto which you can load as many negative stereotypes and urban myths as required without worrying about being sued.
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    (Original post by Timon)
    I'm just trying to piece together a picture--nothing more, nothing less. You don't have to get snidey and nasty. I mean no harm. As far as painting with a broad brush, that's how you begin the creative process. You wittle down to the individuality and the nuances of a character once you come to grips with a character and the broadest picture of their life.
    Each to their own. As to being 'snidey and nasty', may I refer you to your posts such as 'Don't think. It'll hurt you too much.'?
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    If somebody is going to be rude and overtly aggressive enough to insult me...well, I'm firing back. If you can pitch, you better be able to catch.
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    i don't know what that implies about everyone's collective sexual preferences
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    (Original post by Timon)
    That would make all characterisations stereotypes then if you use your logic.
    How does that follow?:confused: I said that your character, as you've described her, is a stereotype. There's nothing wrong with that as such, I just don't really see how using the name of an actual college would create realism when for the purpose of your story you'll probably be portraying Philippa's college in equally stereotypical terms, in order to make it match the character. If anything, inventing a fictional college would make things easier for you as a writer and give you more freedom, because it would allow you to build your college from scratch, as it were; there'd be no pesky facts to get in the way of your story and no current or former students would be able to get indignant at how you've misrepresented their college.
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    Oxford: Christchurch, Magdalen, New College.
    Cambridge: St John's, Trinity.
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    hobnob - inserting fictional characters into actual places isn't exactly new, nor is it problematic.

    OP, Brasenose. Can't believe nobody has said that already.
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    (Original post by JW)
    hobnob - inserting fictional characters into actual places isn't exactly new, nor is it problematic.
    Of course not - I never said that it was. But you'll have to admit that to take a complete caricature of a fictional character, make a great fuss about inserting it into a place which bears the name of an actual place (which you really know nothing about) and then claim you're doing this because you're aiming for 'realism' is ridiculous.
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    I'm not sure a great fuss is being made. The college in question will be a contextual detail, much like the schooling and parentage of the character in question.

    Whether or not college stereotypes are watertight, certain colleges still carry certain social implications which might resonate with the type of character the OP is trying to imagine. For me, at least.
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    Whatever.:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Timon)
    ...
    Brasenose has the highest proportion of student from independent schools, but still has over 40% state educated.

    As others have said, you need to decide whether its going to be down to earth and realistic (and with phillipa double-barreled surname it certainly doesn't sound like it) or if its going to be up in the air, rich people everywhere, stereotypical Oxbridge. I assure you, the picture you have painted so far is far more the latter
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    I'm surprised people think Magdalen. Madg is a bit too intellectual.

    I would have gone with New. It's not quite the boring old usual answer of ChCh, but still has a lot of those types I think. I think if this person was a man the answer might more likely be ChCh, but as a female I think New edges it.

    Toriel wasn't a bad nod actually. I can see that.

    Brasenose was a good one to raise, but I feel Brasenose is, exactly as someone said, a rah college. This fictional girl sounds a cut above rah to me. Most rahs have no connections to the aristocracy. They are well off but rarely from the 'old' kind of family being mentioned here. In my experience they're actually rather nouveau riche, if that even, simply middle class and 'comfortable'. This girl, as I picture her, is too horsey and distinguished to be seen on High St in pajama bottoms and a hoody. That's what Brasenose rah girls do best as far as I can tell!

    So I would advance Exeter as a third and final alternative to the slightly tawdry ChCh option. If it's for a work of literature, your mission is to be a little fresh and frankly ChCh was done in Brideshead as we all know. Exeter has a noticeable cohort of wealthy, more classy people.
 
 
 
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