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Gsce grades - oxbridge

9998876544 for oxford or cambridge? To study law
Hey!!

Universities don't really care about GCSE Results, just A-Levels. Although, Oxford does care about them a bit more than Cambridge. You shouldn't let this stop you from applying. If you achieve really high results in your A-Levels and do really with your Personal Statement and Interviews, I'm sure you will have a high chance of being accepted.


May I ask, what subjects did you get the 9s and 8s in??
Original post by Anonymous #1
9998876544 for oxford or cambridge? To study law

What's the breakdown of your GCSE grades?

What were the 9s and 8s in?

What subjects were the 7 and 6 in?

What about the 5?

Lastly the 4s? They might not matter if it is not relevant to the subject you're applying for.

Have you decided on your A-Level subject choices?
Reply 3
Original post by thegeek888
What's the breakdown of your GCSE grades?
What were the 9s and 8s in?
What subjects were the 7 and 6 in?
What about the 5?
Lastly the 4s? They might not matter if it is not relevant to the subject you're applying for.
Have you decided on your A-Level subject choices?


9s in - history , sociology , psychology ,
8s - english lit & classics
7s in maths & english lang & bio
5 - drama
4 - art & physics
Original post by mara.zz
9s in - history , sociology , psychology ,
8s - english lit & classics
7s in maths & english lang & bio
5 - drama
4 - art & physics
Drama and Art are not easy, as you need to be truly talented to achieve a top grade in those subjects.

The 4 in Physics won't be a problem if you're applying for PPE, Economics and Management, History, Politics, Languages or Psychology. However, if it is Physics or Maths or even Engineering then you might have an issue?! ☹️
Reply 5
Original post by thegeek888
Drama and Art are not easy, as you need to be truly talented to achieve a top grade in those subjects.
The 4 in Physics won't be a problem if you're applying for PPE, Economics and Management, History, Politics, Languages or Psychology. However, if it is Physics or Maths or even Engineering then you might have an issue?! ☹️


I want to study law and am doing humanties for alevels
Original post by mara.zz
I want to study law and am doing humanties for alevels

English, History and French?

You should apply for Law, and it is the LNAT that will prove to be a 'defining' factor whether you're shortlisted for interviews.
Original post by thegeek888
English, History and French?
You should apply for Law, and it is the LNAT that will prove to be a 'defining' factor whether you're shortlisted for interviews.

The LNAT is not the decisive factor. Some candidates with high LNAT scores are not interviewed. Some with relatively lower scores are interviewed.

OP, thegeek888 probably means well, but he has no personal experience of university admissions (he's an A level student who says that he intends to apply to university at some point in the future, but not this year), and it appears that he may misunderstand how Oxford and Cambridge assess applicants who wish to study law.

Oxford and Cambridge look at predicted or actual grades in A levels or the IB, the LNAT multiple choice result, the LNAT essay, the personal statement, the reference, and GCSE grades when deciding whether to interview a candidate. Oxford and Cambridge seek to assess commitment to study of the the subject and the potential to do well within the tutorial/supervision based system of teaching used by those universities.

I suggest that you seek guidance from the teachers at your school as to which universities they consider that you have a realistic chance of obtaining offers from. The reference to be provided by one of your teachers is important - Oxbridge will be looking for indications of outstanding academic potential. Good luck.

By way of background, I am an Oxford graduate (Modern History) and am a practising barrister. I am in regular contact with law tutors at Oxford, and my daughter has just been through the Oxford entrance process, obtaining a place to study law.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 8
Original post by Stiffy Byng
The LNAT is not the decisive factor. Some candidates with high LNAT scores are not interviewed. Some with relatively lower scores are interviewed.
OP, thegeek888 probably means well, but he has no personal experience of university admissions (he's an A level student who says that he intends to apply to university at some point in the future, but not this year), and it appears that he may misunderstand how Oxford and Cambridge assess applicants who wish to study law.
Oxford and Cambridge look at predicted or actual grades in A levels or the IB, the LNAT multiple choice result, the LNAT essay, the personal statement, the reference, and GCSE grades when deciding whether to interview a candidate. Oxford and Cambridge seek to assess commitment to study of the the subject and the potential to do well within the tutorial/supervision based system of teaching used by those universities.
I suggest that you seek guidance from the teachers at your school as to which universities they consider that you have a realistic chance of obtaining offers from. The reference to be provided by one of your teachers is important - Oxbridge will be looking for indications of outstanding academic potential. Good luck.
By way of background, I am an Oxford graduate (Modern History) and am a practising barrister. I am in regular contact with law tutors at Oxford, and my daughter has just been through the Oxford entrance process, obtaining a place to study law.


what about if i have extenuating circumstances? And mention that in my reference/application by a gp or counsellor
Original post by Anonymous #1
what about if i have extenuating circumstances? And mention that in my reference/application by a gp or counsellor

Oxbridge considers contextual factors. Individual circumstances may be best dealt with in the reference. There are, however, no magic carpet rides into Oxbridge. The admissions tutors try to treat all candidates fairly and to discount circumstantial barriers, but each candidate still has to demonstrate the potential to thrive academically within the environment of a collegiate university with a high student workload and a lot of one to one or small-group contact between students and academic staff.
I add that you should of course apply to study law if that is your preference, and the study of law is a thing worthy in itself, regardless of your career aims. If it is your aim to practise as a lawyer, it may be worth knowing that about half of the lawyers in the UK have degrees in subjects other than law. There is much to be said for studying at university a subject which you enjoy, because you may be more likely to do well if you like your subject.

There are relatively few careers in which having a specific degree is a requisite for entry to a job. Medicine, and professions related to medicine, are example of such careers, as are engineering and working in the technical end of the computer world. For the most part, possession of a degree in an academically rigorous subject can be a useful preparation for an interesting career in a variety of fields. People sometimes assume that, for example, studying Maths or English fits a person only to teach Maths or English at a school or university, but people with such degrees do a wide variety of jobs as well as teaching. In other words, those who wish to study Akkadian languages, or Geography, or Biology, or whatever, should feel free to do so even if they do not intend to get jobs directly related to those subjects.

One of the best things about university is that it gives you time to find out more about yourself, about the world, and about what you might like to do when you leave the academic environment (or, indeed, whether you wish to stay in that environment and make a career of it). Bear in mind also that we can all have more than one career if we wish, and if the dice roll for us.

I am a bazillion years old. My general advice to people in their late teens and early twenties is: don't be in a rush.
(edited 1 month ago)
If you have extenuating circumstances then you should certainly ask your teacher to mention them in the reference.
Original post by Anonymous
9998876544 for oxford or cambridge? To study law

these are literally the grades that I got and I want to apply to Cambridge for law too!! I got 9998876554 and was worried about if it would hinder me later but a lot of people say that predicted A levels, LNAT, and interview matters much more.
Original post by thegeek888
What's the breakdown of your GCSE grades?
What were the 9s and 8s in?
What subjects were the 7 and 6 in?
What about the 5?
Lastly the 4s? They might not matter if it is not relevant to the subject you're applying for.
Have you decided on your A-Level subject choices?

sorry, for reference I got around the same GCSEs as OP but I got a 2 5s and 1 4 instead of 1 5 and 2 4s and also want to apply for law, my 9s were in sociology, re, and English lit, 8s were in English lang and history, 7 was in Spanish, 6 was in business, 55 was in science, and 4 was in maths. My A levels are history, sociology, and philosophy and ethics. Is this suitable for Cambridge law?
Original post by Anonymous
sorry, for reference I got around the same GCSEs as OP but I got a 2 5s and 1 4 instead of 1 5 and 2 4s and also want to apply for law, my 9s were in sociology, re, and English lit, 8s were in English lang and history, 7 was in Spanish, 6 was in business, 55 was in science, and 4 was in maths. My A levels are history, sociology, and philosophy and ethics. Is this suitable for Cambridge law?
Yes, you have a better chance of success at Cambridge. 🙂
Original post by thegeek888
Yes, you have a better chance of success at Cambridge. 🙂


Based on what you have posted in this forum about your academic profile, you aren't in a position to offer a meaningful evaluation of anyone else's chances of getting into Cambridge, and it's not helpful to others to express opinions which have no foundation in relevant knowledge or relevant experience.

If you pass some A levels, apply to at least one university, and obtain an offer from at least one university, you might be better placed to advise others others about their university prospects. Why not try doing that?
(edited 1 month ago)

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