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    (Original post by gooner1886)
    In the Jan 13 paper - q7 (b), for the cell represenation, why do they penalise you for writing down Pt?
    The Fe and Cu serve as electrons, they aren't both aqueous so you dont need them
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    Well this is embarrassing i read it wrong. sorry guys. good luck everyone
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    (Original post by Mistrykid)
    It was horrendous. So too was the Jan '13 paper I did earlier today:sad:
    I know! I found those two to be the most difficult ones I've done.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    I didn't do that badly up until question 8 where I lost 8 marks. I also lost quite a few marks on question three, three of which were because I got the formula for silver fluoride wrong - I was not impressed
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    (Original post by fredstan5014)
    Guys, what do you need in this paper to get an A. maay seem dumb but all the ums calculator get contradicted by aqa scaled mark boundarys it seems :/
    It's usually between 71 and 74 for an A.
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    (Original post by brittanna)
    It's usually between 71 and 74 for an A.


    Is it not close to 80 odd? Like Unit 2 and 4?
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    (Original post by gooner1886)
    In the Jan 13 paper - q7 (b), for the cell represenation, why do they penalise you for writing down Pt?
    Because Cu and Fe are solid, so you don't need a platinum electrode
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    Out of the two definitions for second ionization enthalpy, which would you pick?

    1) The enthalpy change when one mole of electrons are lost from one mole of a gaseous 1+ ion to form a gaseous 2+ ion

    2) The enthalpy change when one mole of gaseous 2+ ions are formed from one mole of gaseous 1+ ions
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    (Original post by crc290)
    Because Cu and Fe are solid, so you don't need a platinum electrode
    (Original post by Kev.1995)
    The Fe and Cu serve as electrons, they aren't both aqueous so you dont need them

    Ah. Thank you.
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    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    BL acid is a proton donor
    Lewis base is an electron donor

    In the case of H+ and OH- ions, yes you are right. In the case of [Cr(H2O)6]3+ and ammonia-dropwise (to form NH4+ ions), no. The chromium complex may be a bronsted lowry acid, but is not a lewis base.
    Thanks!


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    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    Lewis base is an electron donor.
    (Original post by RoaringLion)
    Thanks!
    Should just add that a Lewis base is an electron pair donor. Most mark schemes don't allow just 'electron donor'
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    HAS ANYONE GOT THE JANUARY 2013 PAPERR?! ( and mark scheme)
    (((( cant find it anywhere

    (Pretty please)


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    did anyone else think the Jan 2013 paper was hard? I just did it and I couldnt answer some of the questions, Like the "calculate the bond enthalpy for the Cl-F bond" I couldnt even remember how to do that
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    (Original post by Affliction)
    Out of the two definitions for second ionization enthalpy, which would you pick?

    1) The enthalpy change when one mole of electrons are lost from one mole of a gaseous 1+ ion to form a gaseous 2+ ion

    2) The enthalpy change when one mole of gaseous 2+ ions are formed from one mole of gaseous 1+ ions
    1st one
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    (Original post by Shalo1)
    HAS ANYONE GOT THE JANUARY 2013 PAPERR?! ( and mark scheme)
    (((( cant find it anywhere

    (Pretty please)


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Just search this thread, its already been posted multiple times...
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    (Original post by Shalo1)
    HAS ANYONE GOT THE JANUARY 2013 PAPERR?! ( and mark scheme)
    (((( cant find it anywhere

    (Pretty please)


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2264891
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    (Original post by gooner1886)
    Is it not close to 80 odd? Like Unit 2 and 4?
    No, I think 74 is the highest it's ever been for an A. If you look on this website, it tells you what raw mark corresponds to what UMS, and what the grade boundaries were for each exam:

    http://www.aqa.org.uk/exams-administ...t-marks-to-ums
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    (Original post by flyylikejetz)
    That is the overall equation.
    You will need to be able to use and recognise:

    4H20 + 4e- --> 2H2 + 4OH-
    2H2O + 4e- --> O2 + 4OH-

    and the way to represent them

    (Original post by Dalts)
    you dont need to know a single one, they'll give you values etc, and just ask you questions on what they tell you

    okay, thank you
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    is the salt bridge soaked in KNO3?
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    (Original post by im7)
    I had a look at the specification about whether this unit was synoptic, and it said that all A2 units do have to have some synoptic element, and although this isn't an entirely separate assessment, it is sort of woven into the questions e.g. stuff like bond angles and oxidation states which are in the first unit.
    However this unit doesn't have synoptic stuff from unit 4 (and probably most of unit 2 as these units both featured lots of organic chemistry) as unit 4 and 5 can be taken in any order
    Thank you!
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    Anyone know the perfect definition for 'mean bond enthalpy'?
 
 
 
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