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    Hi everybody i'm a foreign student thinking of studying in the UK for university.

    Right now i do not know which to put as firm, i have offers from the following:

    -LSE for Business Mathematics with Statistics
    -Imperial for Maths with Stats for finance

    Now i definitely don't plan on going for research but am not sure of what career path i want to take. Right now i'm leaning towards finance but i know there is a lot of competition for jobs currently and probably in the future as well so i'm not too sure.

    I also don't wanna close doors to energy/it/telecommunications sector after i graduate which is the feeling i get if i go to LSE

    Finally, i want to work internationally and so i want the uni whose brand name will carry me around the world.
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    (Original post by storeypj)
    Hi everybody i'm a foreign student thinking of studying in the UK for university.

    Right now i do not know which to put as firm, i have offers from the following:

    -LSE for Business Mathematics with Statistics
    -Imperial for Maths with Stats for finance

    Now i definitely don't plan on going for research but am not sure of what career path i want to take. Right now i'm leaning towards finance but i know there is a lot of competition for jobs currently and probably in the future as well so i'm not too sure.

    I also don't wanna close doors to energy/it/telecommunications sector after i graduate which is the feeling i get if i go to LSE

    Finally, i want to work internationally and so i want the uni whose brand name will carry me around the world.
    Read this by dugdugdug:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...highlight=GCHQ
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    Neither, Oxford.
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    Had the same choice to make, had offers from Cambridge, Imperial, LSE, UCL and Warwick, went for Cambridge firm, LSE insurance. Increased job prospects with LSE for finance, especially with the econ bit of the degree added, easier degree than Imperial, not the biggest maths enthusiast in the world so it's fine. For research though go for Imperial.
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    (Original post by marcus2001)
    Had the same choice to make, had offers from Cambridge, Imperial, LSE, UCL and Warwick, went for Cambridge firm, LSE insurance. Increased job prospects with LSE for finance, especially with the econ bit of the degree added, easier degree than Imperial, not the biggest maths enthusiast in the world so it's fine. For research though go for Imperial.
    But you're severely limiting your choices if you go for LSE.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...highlight=GCHQ
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    (Original post by marcus2001)
    Had the same choice to make, had offers from Cambridge, Imperial, LSE, UCL and Warwick, went for Cambridge firm, LSE insurance. Increased job prospects with LSE for finance, especially with the econ bit of the degree added, easier degree than Imperial, not the biggest maths enthusiast in the world so it's fine. For research though go for Imperial.
    Dear god man, not the 'biggest maths enthusiast in the world' and you've firmed Cambridge (at this point I'm hoping it isn't for straight mathematics).
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    (Original post by dugdugdug)
    But you're severely limiting your choices if you go for LSE.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...highlight=GCHQ
    Link is broken; why do you say that? And well it's too late now I'm at LSE.

    (Original post by Noble.)
    Dear god man, not the 'biggest maths enthusiast in the world' and you've firmed Cambridge (at this point I'm hoping it isn't for straight mathematics).
    It was for straight mathematics and that was last year.. don't get me wrong I do really enjoy doing many parts of maths, but I don't live and breathe it like most Cambridge mathmos, I have many other interests, fyi I missed out on STEP after never committing to it because I realised I'd be better off at LSE based on my ability and preferences.
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    (Original post by marcus2001)
    Link is broken; why do you say that? And well it's too late now I'm at LSE.



    It was for straight mathematics and that was last year.. don't get me wrong I do really enjoy doing many parts of maths, but I don't live and breathe it like most Cambridge mathmos, I have many other interests, fyi I missed out on STEP after never committing to it because I realised I'd be better off at LSE based on my ability and preferences.
    Try this:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...highlight=GCHQ

    It's because LSE only offer business related maths, ie stats and discrete.

    At uni, there's pure (analysis and algebra), applied, numerical, mathematical physics, stats and discrete.

    You might actually be interested and good at other areas of maths but since LSE don't offer it, you won't know.

    It's a bit like having been taught only stats or appplied and not both at school (with pure of course). Those who've been exposed to both will have a distinct advantage, even if the uni offer remedial classes.

    Also by only having done a few areas of maths, you might limit yourself in careers later if you want a heavily mathematically orientated job such as a quant in an IB, which requires analysis, stats and applied.

    It's not too late as you can always ask to change unis.
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    (Original post by dugdugdug)
    Try this:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...highlight=GCHQ

    It's because LSE only offer business related maths, ie stats and discrete.

    At uni, there's pure (analysis and algebra), applied, numerical, mathematical physics, stats and discrete.

    You might actually be interested and good at other areas of maths but since LSE don't offer it, you won't know.

    It's a bit like having been taught only stats or appplied and not both at school (with pure of course). Those who've been exposed to both will have a distinct advantage, even if the uni offer remedial classes.

    Also by only having done a few areas of maths, you might limit yourself in careers later if you want a heavily mathematically orientated job such as a quant in an IB, which requires analysis, stats and applied.

    It's not too late as you can always ask to change unis.
    Woah woah woah let's back up a bit here.

    Don't think I took this decision lightly in choosing between the aforementioned uni's, in the end I decided to priotise my want for finance related career prospects and interest in economics over my interest in maths, which is why I chose the LSE and a degree in mathematics with economics.

    I'm currently at the LSE and feel you have a bad view of what the math's course is like here, first year you do 4 modules, stats, abstract maths, mathematical methods, and economics. The topics we cover include calculus, linear algebra, analysis, sets and groups etc. Modules we'll be doing next year include further mathematical methods, real analysis with optionals such as complex analysis, differential equations, algebra and number theory etc. I mean don't get me wrong, of course LSE is more discrete maths orientated, but doing a maths degree isn't going to neglect all other area's of maths.

    Finally, I strongly doubt doing a maths degree from LSE is going to close off doors for roles requiring a quantitative degree, for Quant type roles graduate studies are required and it is here where it will be insufficient, as would an undergraduate maths degree from anywhere.
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    (Original post by marcus2001)
    Woah woah woah let's back up a bit here.

    Don't think I took this decision lightly in choosing between the aforementioned uni's, in the end I decided to priotise my want for finance related career prospects and interest in economics over my interest in maths, which is why I chose the LSE and a degree in mathematics with economics.

    I'm currently at the LSE and feel you have a bad view of what the math's course is like here, first year you do 4 modules, stats, abstract maths, mathematical methods, and economics. The topics we cover include calculus, linear algebra, analysis, sets and groups etc. Modules we'll be doing next year include further mathematical methods, real analysis with optionals such as complex analysis, differential equations, algebra and number theory etc. I mean don't get me wrong, of course LSE is more discrete maths orientated, but doing a maths degree isn't going to neglect all other area's of maths.

    Finally, I strongly doubt doing a maths degree from LSE is going to close off doors for roles requiring a quantitative degree, for Quant type roles graduate studies are required and it is here where it will be insufficient, as would an undergraduate maths degree from anywhere.
    Unless you (LSE) invest in more time than other unis, the fact you do methods and further methods (whatever that entails) and economics means there are other topics you won't have covered.

    To name but a few, fluid dynamics, waves and solitons, group representation theory, module theory, differential geometry, functional analysis, numerical solutions of diff eqns, constrained optimisation, etc.

    If you never covered a topic at the undergrad level it would be difficult, if not impossible, to do it as a postgrad.
 
 
 
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