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    I am going to retake AS Physics as I failed it :'(
    I need some help on the methods that you guys use to study Physics. Please help .


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    When you're studying/attempting problems, make sure you actually UNDERSTAND what's physically going on. It sounds obvious, but so many people (even people who get good grades) rely on memorising formulae and principles and even example questions, so that the effect is purely learning by rote. If you have a good grasp of the underlying physics you DON'T NEED to memorise so many equations.

    Make summary sheets condensing individual topics to aid your revision.

    I's never too early to start revising. Keep refreshing topics that you haven't looked at for a few weeks.

    It's not a spectator sport, you have to have a pen in your hand to study physics - attempt lots of problems
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    (Original post by ZazenTree)
    When you're studying/attempting problems, make sure you actually UNDERSTAND what's physically going on. It sounds obvious, but so many people (even people who get good grades) rely on memorising formulae and principles and even example questions, so that the effect is purely learning by rote. If you have a good grasp of the underlying physics you DON'T NEED to memorise so many equations.

    Make summary sheets condensing individual topics to aid your revision.

    I's never too early to start revising. Keep refreshing topics that you haven't looked at for a few weeks.

    It's not a spectator sport, you have to have a pen in your hand to study physics - attempt lots of problems
    i agree,my teacher is an idiot and thhinks that rote is the key
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    Agree with post #2

    I found that whilst a lot of time spent doing further reading and just thinking about concepts, it is worth knowing how all physics grows like a fungus (sorry!) from core principles, the common habit of skim reading and pluggin in formulae, leads to A2 results that wont ever be excellent, and more importantly any decent physics degree application process will sniff out the memorisers!!

    As an example in AS Physics I would make fully sure you understand how: potential difference, emf and electrical potential energy all form the basis of any electrical circuit. This crucial relation is glossed over in most AS books and by most teachers.
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    Questions, questions and more questions.

    Post #2 sums it up. You should really understand Physics. You should always ask the question WHY? WHY? WHY?.

    And make sure you have zero doubts. You must see stuff in many angles. It's hard to explain, so I'll stopp,,,
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    Post #2 has it basically in the bag.

    The thing is, in exams, you won't be asked to show what you know (unlike in maths), you will be asked to apply what you know to solve physical problems. It's a lot like the real world where showing your knowledge isn't relevant and actually demonstrating your ability to apply your knowledge is.

    When you revise, you should make sure (as post #2 says) you actually know your stuff and understand it. Do multiple practise papers to practise your problem solving skills. Ask for problems from your teachers, solve the problem and hand them in for marking.
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    (Original post by ZazenTree)
    When you're studying/attempting problems, make sure you actually UNDERSTAND what's physically going on. It sounds obvious, but so many people (even people who get good grades) rely on memorising formulae and principles and even example questions, so that the effect is purely learning by rote. If you have a good grasp of the underlying physics you DON'T NEED to memorise so many equations.

    Make summary sheets condensing individual topics to aid your revision.

    I's never too early to start revising. Keep refreshing topics that you haven't looked at for a few weeks.

    It's not a spectator sport, you have to have a pen in your hand to study physics - attempt lots of problems
    This. I got As in every module other than my final EMPA which dragged my grade to a B, so I'm resiting next year as well. The key to success I'm the exams is definitely understanding the physics which is going on. Read more than just the textbook you get from school; consult Wikipedia and other sources if you don't grasp something. Don't rely on school textbooks being RIGHT either, if something smells fishy then question it. I had a first generation AQA Astrophysics book last year and it was littered with mistakes. I genuinely could have wrote better myself in some parts. So be aware of this also.

    The best thing you can do to pass exams is understand the physics. Then you can hit any question. A prime example of people rote learning and not understanding was this summer's C3 Exam in Maths - it was a hard paper with new styles of questions and loads of people flunked it. Only those of us that understood the Maths involved passed it - which is how it should be in fairness.
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    Post No.2 has it in the bag! Don't rely on memorising formulae or memorising how something works... understand the core of the formulae and how they are derived and ALWAYS ask if you don't understand something. People might get annoyed but in the end you'll have better marks than them and it will be obvious that their rigid/static memorisation of the textbook and what the teacher says will be their downfall. Studying Physics should completely change how you look at everyday things because of how you are forced to think about basic things.
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    I will take all this into consideration as I continue to tackle Physics . Thanks a bunch guys


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    Also post questions on tsr if your teachers are rubbish
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    Basically zazentree said it. The best way it to understand the underlying concepts. Also do LOTS of past papers. Even if they are not for your board ( but make sure its relevant for your spec). Just search google and you will find lots. Also i did AQA and everyone flopped the EMPA. It happens but if you practice properly for it you won't. but mostly the exams compensate for it!
    PS i got A*

    Good luck mate.
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    (Original post by E=mc२)
    I will take all this into consideration as I continue to tackle Physics . Thanks a bunch guys


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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...&page=2&page=2

    My advice and resources are in the second post in that page. Just people say, understand stuff, practice and do ALL past papers
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    (Original post by krisshP)
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...&page=2&page=2

    My advice and resources are in the second post in that page. Just people say, understand stuff, practice and do ALL past papers
    is that the correct link?

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    (Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
    is that the correct link?

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    Yes, the second post on that page
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    (Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
    is that the correct link?

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    I swear you did Edexcel Physics this sumer at AS as well as me. How did AS Physics go for you? What grade did you get?
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    (Original post by krisshP)
    I swear you did Edexcel Physics this sumer at AS as well as me. How did AS Physics go for you? What grade did you get?
    went very well. 120 for unit 1 and 2. But for unit 3 (I sat the international alternative) I scored 53. I might have that remarked (my twin got 60 ).
    Went well for you too I guess¡

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    (Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
    went very well. 120 for unit 1 and 2. But for unit 3 (I sat the international alternative) I scored 53. I might have that remarked (my twin got 60 ).
    Went well for you too I guess¡

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    Incredibly went here . I was expecting a C/ weak B after unit 1 exam. Turned out I got full UMS for unit 1 somehow and got an A overall for AS Physics
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    (Original post by krisshP)
    Incredibly went here . I was expecting a C/ weak B after unit 1 exam. Turned out I got full UMS for unit 1 somehow and got an A overall for AS Physics
    A so All is well :yy:

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    (Original post by E=mc२)
    I am going to retake AS Physics as I failed it :'(
    I need some help on the methods that you guys use to study Physics. Please help .


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    As everybody above has said, the most important thing is that you understand what is going on and why it's the case. Memorising facts and formulae won't get you very far in physics, because they like to ask questions from weird angles.

    In terms of actual revision strategies, the biggest thing is practice and repetition. Do every problem you can find over and over again until you can do it with your eyes shut. Once you realise that you're using the same formulae for so many different types of problems, and how certain things are strikingly similar to one another, your overall understanding of how everything fits together will increase drastically. Do every single past paper, mark it, then do it again a couple of weeks later. Rinse and repeat until you can do every question. (Memorising the answers is cheating!)

    I also find that post-it notes help a lot for revision in general, and physics especially. Every time I learn something new or come across something I don't understand, I write it on a colourful post-it note and stick it on the wall above my desk; then it's there as a reference every time I need it, until after a while I realise that I've stopped needing it.

    Don't bother trying to memorise formulae. Everything you need either is on the formula sheet or can be derived from what is on the formula sheet. Practising derivation is much easier, and better for understanding, than trying to memorise every variation of the formulae.

    At the end of each topic, try to condense everything you know into about two or three pages of A4, while still covering all the curriculum point thingies. If you can't do that, the chances are you don't understand the topic as well as you think you do. It sounds counter-intuitive, but a lot of physics is about making things as simple as possible and it really does help a lot - it's probably the only subject where trying to make your notes as short as possible is a good idea
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    I just finished my AS in physics(starting A2 September) in my january results i got an E for my module 1 in physics, though i had missed quite a bit of the lessons due to some health issues, i was soo gutted. My teacher Started doing extra revision sessions to prepair me and the others who failed for the retake in the summer. WE did soooo many past papers in the revision session, going through the questions as a class and picking out the areas where you can make easy mistakes e.g unit conversions. Now im on OCR A Physics exam board so the 1st module is all Mechanics and amounts to about 30% of the AS while unit 2 is 50% of the AS, meaning unit 2 is a big exam!! Never have i done sooo many past paper questions and we did loads of practicals to show us how it all actuly works, which i think helped tremendously. In the end i got a C in my retake and an A for my unit 2 but i got a U in the practical assesment "_" retaking next year. ended up overal with a C(3ums off a B). Basicaly never give up and you can make massive jumps up in grades
 
 
 
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