Lamellae and Thylakoids??? Watch

Tillsy
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What is the difference between a Lamellae and a thylakoid?? Thanks


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Tappouni
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(Original post by Tillsy)
What is the difference between a Lamellae and a thylakoid?? Thanks


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Soo the thylakoids are the disc-like structures, a stack of them is a grana. The lamellae are tubular extensions which join up with thylakoids in adjacent grana. So basically the lamellae are bridges between thylakoids in different stacks.

Hope that helps
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Tillsy
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(Original post by Tappouni)
Soo the thylakoids are the disc-like structures, a stack of them is a grana. The lamellae are tubular extensions which join up with thylakoids in adjacent grana. So basically the lamellae are bridges between thylakoids in different stacks.

Hope that helps
It says in my A2 textbook that the granum is a stack of Lamellae :/ it's really confusing me cos then it says the grana are stacks of stacks of flattened membrane compartments called thylakoids?!

I know the intergranal Lamellae are the connection thingys


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Tappouni
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(Original post by Tillsy)
It says in my A2 textbook that the granum is a stack of Lamellae :/ it's really confusing me cos then it says the grana are stacks of stacks of flattened membrane compartments called thylakoids?!

I know the intergranal Lamellae are the connection thingys


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Sounds like that's wrong in your textbook In mine (AQA A2) it says grana are stacks of thylakoids in a chloroplast, and is the site of the light-dependent reaction.

A thylakoid is a series of flattened membranous sacs in a chloroplast, that contain chlorophyll and the associated molecules needed for the light-dependent reaction
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Tillsy
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(Original post by Tappouni)
Sounds like that's wrong in your textbook In mine (AQA A2) it says grana are stacks of thylakoids in a chloroplast, and is the site of the light-dependent reaction.

A thylakoid is a series of flattened membranous sacs in a chloroplast, that contain chlorophyll and the associated molecules needed for the light-dependent reaction
I'm doing OCR

Just confused about what you would call it, especially since ocr are so picky in their mark schemes!!!


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Tappouni
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(Original post by Tillsy)
I'm doing OCR

Just confused about what you would call it, especially since ocr are so picky in their mark schemes!!!


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Picky mark schemes are very frustrating :mad: So, in reply to your original question of what the difference between them is, I suppose you could say that thylakoids are arranged in stacks, called grana, whilst lamellae just link between the stacks?
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JonnyD
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I do OCR - this bit in the textbook is terrible. Especially the diagrams.

I am also confused - guess it could be a mistake in the textbook?

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Tappouni
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(Original post by JonnyD)
I do OCR - this bit in the textbook is terrible. Especially the diagrams.

I am also confused - guess it could be a mistake in the textbook?

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AQA don't do it in much detail - you need to know about the light-dependent and independent reactions (inc. the electron transport chain etc..), but as for where it all occurs, it's just a tiny paragraph saying what thylakoids are, and that they contain chlorophyll...also mentions that lamellae exist
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Tillsy
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(Original post by JonnyD)
I do OCR - this bit in the textbook is terrible. Especially the diagrams.

I am also confused - guess it could be a mistake in the textbook?

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Yeah I think it might be. I keep rereading it, I think (could be wrong) that Lamellae refers to how the inner membrane is folded and the actual membrane compartment thing is the thylakoid?? Potentially?! I've emailed my teacher so I'll let you know what he says


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Tillsy
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(Original post by Tappouni)
AQA don't do it in much detail - you need to know about the light-dependent and independent reactions (inc. the electron transport chain etc..), but as for where it all occurs, it's just a tiny paragraph saying what thylakoids are, and that they contain chlorophyll...also mentions that lamellae exist
That's pretty much the same as ours we only know that electrons travel down the electron transpot chains and release eneergy in the form of ATP as they do so, the ATP is then used to pump the hydrogen ions from the stroma into the thylakoid space


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Kallisto
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Lammella is a 'stack' of a granum. Five of them result in a granum. The membrane of the granum is the thylakoid which is responsible for photosynthesis.

EDIT: I have changed my comment, as I have misunderstood the question of the thread starter.
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KanKan
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I found this image very useful:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi.../67/Granum.svg
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Kallisto
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(Original post by KanKan)
I found this image very useful:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi.../67/Granum.svg
I see. That is really a very helpful image to clearify the context. It helped me to realize my mistake. Thanks to you!
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Tillsy
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Ok I think my book might be wrong :/ the poster above the bit that is highlighted to be the lamella, in my book it calls that the intergranal lamella...


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JK1011
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Tappouni is correct.As far as I know Thylakoids are in stacks in the Chloroplasts known as Grana (singular Granum) and Grana can have a lot, up to 100 Thylakoids stacked up and the Thylakoids are where the Chlorophyll is in the Chloroplast. The Lamella are also in the Grana and they are additions to the Thylakoids, they join Thylakoids together with that of adjacent Grana. Although they are nothing really alike, I remember this by thinking of the Lamella similar to the Plasmodesmata joining the Cytoplasm of plant palisade cells which is under the topic of Transpiration I believe.
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Tillsy
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(Original post by JK1011)
Tappouni is correct.As far as I know Thylakoids are in stacks in the Chloroplasts known as Grana (singular Granum) and Grana can have a lot, up to 100 Thylakoids stacked up and the Thylakoids are where the Chlorophyll is in the Chloroplast. The Lamella are also in the Grana and they are additions to the Thylakoids, they join Thylakoids together with that of adjacent Grana. Although they are nothing really alike, I remember this by thinking of the Lamella similar to the Plasmodesmata joining the Cytoplasm of plant palisade cells which is under the topic of Transpiration I believe. Depending on your exam board, if you're doing AQA I'm pretty sure this is in the spec for Unit 2 AS.
Oook thanks this is really helpful!! No unfortunately I do OCR A2 but I wish I did AQA


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Tappouni
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(Original post by Tillsy)
Oook thanks this is really helpful!! No unfortunately I do OCR A2 but I wish I did AQA

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Oh trust me you'd hate AQA haha. Normally the exams are filled with data analysis for the most part, with a little bit of biology, and incredibly picky mark schemes, which are, to say the least, frustrating :mad:
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Tillsy
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(Original post by Tappouni)
Oh trust me you'd hate AQA haha. Normally the exams are filled with data analysis for the most part, with a little bit of biology, and incredibly picky mark schemes, which are, to say the least, frustrating :mad:
Really?? I do aqa chem and I think the course is brilliant!
With ocr the stuff is interesting but there is so much to learn


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JK1011
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It's true, it's filled with data analysis. I personally hate AQA Chemistry but love AQA Biology.
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Tappouni
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(Original post by Tillsy)
Really?? I do aqa chem and I think the course is brilliant!
With ocr the stuff is interesting but there is so much to learn

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AQA Biology really isn't that great I think last year's longer paper kinda showed that...it was absolutely full of graph analysis, had some Biology, but not as much as I thought it would...I was surprised that I got an A* in the mock we did a short while back...only needed 67/100 for an A*!

Yeah I do OCR Salters Chemistry...covers stuff in good detail, papers are better in that they've actually got a lot of content...but I get the same problem of there being so much to learn
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