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AQA Physics PHYA5 - Thursday 18th June 2015 [Exam Discussion Thread] Watch

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    *** OFFICIAL AQA PHYA5 NUCLEAR & THERMAL PHYSICS JUNE 2015 EXAM DISCUSSION THREAD ***
    UNOFFICIAL MARK SCHEME
    SECTION A: Link HERE

    SECTION B (Astrophysics): Link HERE

    Date: 18th June 2015
    Time: 09:00am
    Duration: 1h 45m

    What will the six marker be on?

    VOTE HERE:
    http://www.poll-maker.com/poll340727x7b2b4474-13

    Any resources or revision tips people are willing to share?
    ___________________________

    PHYA4 EXAM DISCUSSION THREAD:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=3047347

    ______________________________

    RESOURCES:

    My personal revision guide for PHYA5!
    Spoiler:
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    My personal revision guide for Astrophysics!
    Past grade boundaries (courtesy of Lau14):
    Spoiler:
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    Old past papers and mark schemes:
    Recommended revision guide for the A2 exams (as flagged up by Disney0702):
    Useful revision website for topic by topic questions on PHYA5 (as flagged up by Kennethm):
    Spoiler:
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    Lau14's INCREDIBLY helpful guide to the A2 EMPA:
    Spoiler:
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    Physics Practical Work – A2 EMPA

    There are two assessed practical sessions (tasks 1 and 2), each one hour long and carried out in lessons under exam conditions, and a written section (duration: 1hr 15). The total mark for the EMPA is 55, with mark distribution varying very slightly between the three parts – usually 15-16 for each practical task and 23-24 or so for the written section. The EMPA is worth 60 UMS (half as much as the other papers, 20% of the year).

    There are four written papers available (June 2010-2013) on the AQA website, but the practical sections are only available from 2013.


    Measuring instruments – range and precision

    The range of a measuring instrument is the lowest and highest reading it can measure (e.g. a thermometer may measure -20 to 100°C).

    The precision of a measuring instrument is one scale division (this term may be used differently in other subjects, this is the definition for AQA Physics), e.g. the precision of the thermometer may be ±1°C. Usually given as a ± value, but the ± might be omitted sometimes.

    Significant figures

    Any reading you take must be given to the correct number of significant figures (e.g. when measuring with a ruler of precision ±0.001m, the reading of half a metre must be written as 0.500, not as 0.5. 50.0cm and 500mm is also acceptable, as long as your units are correct and consistent).


    Dependent and independent variables

    The independent variable readings are those chosen by you (or the ones you are told to take) before carrying out the experiment.
    The dependent variable readings are those that you measure. You must take a repeat reading of this.
    E.g. if you are looking at V/I characteristics you could set voltage to particular values and then measure the current. The voltage is the independent and the current is the dependent variable.


    Recording your results

    There are at least 5 marks available for this in total.

    Two marks are for drawing a results table with a ruler and having the independent variable in the left hand column.
    Include a separate column for any values calculated to plot a graph (e.g. if you have to plot a graph of 1/x but you’ve measured x, add a column for 1/x).

    There are two marks for using the correct number of significant figures for every reading (see above).
    There is another mark for including all units in the table headings. Use either the name of the unit in full or the accepted abbreviation.


    Graph plotting

    There are at least 9 marks available for this.
    The origin does not have to be included unless proportionality is to be shown. If the origin is included mark on both “0”s.

    Choose a scale so that the points cover more than 50% of each axis of A4 graph paper (28x20cm), so horizontal separation of first and last points must not be less than 10cm and vertical separation of first and last points must not be less than 14cm. There are 2 marks available for this. Also pick a scale that is easy to plot and take readings for (e.g. 1cm = 10 units, 2 units or 4 units. Not 1cm = 3 units or 7 units).

    Label both axes of the graph and include the units. There are 2 marks for doing this correctly.

    All points must be accurately plotted (within a distance of 1mm or less from the correct position) with “x” or “+”. There are 3 marks for this (check it!).

    Most graphs will be straight lines. There will be 1 mark for drawing a line of best fit correctly. It should have approximately equal numbers of points on either side of the line, and shouldn’t be influenced by obviously anomalous results. Anomalous results should be indicated if ignored. If the plotted points suggest a curve, a smooth curve should be drawn.

    You may have to find the gradient of graphs. Mark on the graph a large triangle that takes up most of the graph (each side should be minimum 8cm). Write on the triangle the value of the height and the value of the base with the units of each. The gradient = height/base, and the units of the gradients are units of height/units of base.

    Where an intercept is required it can either be read directly from the graph, or a suitable calculation may be required.


    Random errors

    Random errors are always present when an experiment is carried out. They can be reduced or minimised but never removed entirely. They are also described as the uncertainty in the measurement. They can be reduced by taking repeat readings. E.g. a measurement of length using a metre ruler can be given as (25.6 ± 0.1)cm. The units must be included.

    Uncertainty in the measurement from a set of results (e.g. a measurement is repeated 8 times to give 8 values for the length) can be found by first calculating the mean. However, this cannot be given to a higher number of significant figures than the original values. Then find the difference between the mean and the furthest away value and ± it.

    E.g. 8 readings of diameter of a wire are measured with a micrometer to the nearest 0.01mm
    0.30, 0.28, 0.29, 0.27, 0.28, 0.26, 0.31

    The values are all different, but not because a mistake has been made. The micrometer is only capable of giving readings to ±0.01mm, so this would be the error even if all readings were the same. There is also a small variation in the diameter of the wire.

    The mean of these values is 0.2825mm, 0.28mm to the correct number of significant figures. The smallest reading is 0.28mm, and the largest is 0.31mm. The differences between these and the mean are 0.02 and 0.03mm, so the diameter is (0.28 ± 0.03)mm.

    Minimum uncertainty – as mentioned above, there is always an uncertainty in each and every measurement and if there is no variation in readings then the uncertainty is the precision of the measuring instrument.


    Percentage uncertainty

    The most accurate reading is the one with the smallest percentage uncertainty. % uncertainty = (actual uncertainty/reading) x 100.


    Systematic errors

    Systematic errors affect all readings by the same amount and are usually “zero errors”, for example:

    Zero errors in meters. This is where the meter doesn’t read zero when disconnected. Corrections can be made by adding or subtracting the required amount. E.g. if an ammeter reads +0.01A, 0.01A must be subtracted from every reading.

    Zero errors in other measuring instruments. This is where the instrument does not read zero even when the reading should obviously be zero. E.g. a micrometer that has been “zeroed” properly should read 0.000 when the jaws are tightened with nothing in between them. If they do not read 0.000, there is a zero error which can be corrected in the same way.

    OTHER RESOURCES:
    Disney0702's INCREDIBLY helpful recommended online revision guide:
    Spoiler:
    Show

    Lau14's INCREDIBLY helpful scanned handwritten notes:
    Spoiler:
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    Attached Images
  1. File Type: pdf Revision Notes - Unit 5 AQA Physics A-level.pdf (782.0 KB, 2025 views)
  2. File Type: pdf AQA-PHYA5-1-QP-Jun14.pdf (468.9 KB, 892 views)
  3. File Type: pdf AQA-PHYA5-1-W-MS-Jun14.pdf (168.5 KB, 392 views)
  4. File Type: pdf AQA-PHYA5-2A-Astro-QP-Jun14.pdf (288.0 KB, 632 views)
  5. File Type: pdf AQA-PHYA5-2A-Astro-MS-Jun14.pdf (104.2 KB, 305 views)
  6. Attached Files
  7. File Type: ppt A2-53b-Gases.ppt (988.5 KB, 848 views)
  8. File Type: pptx Physics Unit 5 Revision.pptx (1.30 MB, 2608 views)
  9. File Type: ppt Nuclear & Thermal - All.ppt (1.92 MB, 963 views)
  10. File Type: pptx Revision Unit 5A Complete Course 89 slides (Get Revising).pptx (1.69 MB, 934 views)
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    I got my mock exam coming up , :/
    Physics anyway for revision it depends on what grade you want to achieve

    B: reading information in a detailed way

    A : writing that information and to increase your confidence and make you more familiar with answering question

    A*: going back to your notes


    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by GeniuouslyEvil)
    I got my mock exam coming up , :/
    Physics anyway for revision it depends on what grade you want to achieve

    B: reading information in a detailed way

    A : writing that information and to increase your confidence and make you more familiar with answering question

    A*: going back to your notes


    Hope this helps
    Yeah, I'm predicted an A so I'll just try and write everything out!

    When's your mock? Mines the end of January!
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    (Original post by CD223)
    Yeah, I'm predicted an A so I'll just try and write everything out!

    When's your mock? Mines the end of January!


    My mock exam for all three science , core and additional is next week , just when I start the school, first week. That's six exams.


    And to make it even worse I have maths, english, geo and real ICT test,


    So if you add them all up I have a total of 12 mock exam
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    (Original post by GeniuouslyEvil)
    My mock exam for all three science , core and additional is next week , just when I start the school, first week. That's six exams.


    And to make it even worse I have maths, english, geo and real ICT test,


    So if you add them all up I have a total of 12 mock exam
    Wait, sorry, are you GCSE? I was talking of an A2 exam aha!
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    (Original post by CD223)
    Wait, sorry, are you GCSE? I was talking of an A2 exam aha!

    A level physics must be hard
    For some
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    (Original post by GeniuouslyEvil)
    A level physics must be hard
    For some
    Yeah it's really hard haha. What are you thinking of taking at A level?
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    (Original post by CD223)
    Yeah it's really hard haha. What are you thinking of taking at A level?

    I am thinking of taking

    1: chemistry

    2: physics or biology ( don't know which one, more likely biology)

    3: Geography

    4: Maths


    Did you take maths , if so how are you finding it.
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    Anyone taking Medical Physics?
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    (Original post by DCMed96)
    Anyone taking Medical Physics?
    Me
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    (Original post by GeniuouslyEvil)
    I am thinking of taking

    1: chemistry

    2: physics or biology ( don't know which one, more likely biology)

    3: Geography

    4: Maths


    Did you take maths , if so how are you finding it.
    I do A2 Maths, Physics, Computing and History. Maths is probably the easiest once you get the hang of the concepts.


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    Anyone doing astro?


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    Is there a thread for PHYA4? Multiple choice is a killer.
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    (Original post by JaySP)
    Is there a thread for PHYA4? Multiple choice is a killer.
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3047347


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    Cheers fella
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    (Original post by JaySP)
    Cheers fella
    No worries! Good to help each other out!


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    (Original post by CD223)
    I do A2 Maths, Physics, Computing and History. Maths is probably the easiest once you get the hang of the concepts.


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    Thanks
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    (Original post by GeniuouslyEvil)
    Thanks
    That's ok! Good luck in your exams.


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    (Original post by CD223)
    That's ok! Good luck in your exams.


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    You too as well
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    Got my mock for this next week. How do people find thermal physics?


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