Preparation of salts Watch

Alexis1729
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When you want to make a soluble salt, you would add an appropriate metal to an insoluble base. Does it have to be insoluble and why? If that's the case, and you wanted to use a soluble base, then how would the experimental technique differ?

Thank you in advance.
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charco
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(Original post by Alexis1729)
When you want to make a soluble salt, you would add an appropriate metal to an insoluble base. Does it have to be insoluble and why? If that's the case, and you wanted to use a soluble base, then how would the experimental technique differ?

Thank you in advance.
No, you're a bit confused.

You can add excess insoluble base to an acid, filter and evaporate the solution.

With soluble reagents you have to use titration.
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Alexis1729
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Why do you have to do a titration for soluble reactants?
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PharaohFromSpace
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(Original post by Alexis1729)
When you want to make a soluble salt, you would add an appropriate metal to an insoluble base. Does it have to be insoluble and why? If that's the case, and you wanted to use a soluble base, then how would the experimental technique differ?

Thank you in advance.
What about sodium hydroxide, thats a very soluble alkali and can be used to make a salt.

Unless you meant the exclusion of acid-base reactions?
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Alexis1729
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(Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
What about sodium hydroxide, thats a very soluble alkali and can be used to make a salt.

Unless you meant the exclusion of acid-base reactions?
So you can add any base to a metal to get a salt. Then when do you do a titration and what do you mean by 'the exclusion of acid-base reactions'?
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PharaohFromSpace
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(Original post by Alexis1729)
So you can add any base to a metal to get a salt. Then when do you do a titration and what do you mean by 'the exclusion of acid-base reactions'?
In your question you talked about metal-base reactions, so I thought that maybe you were asking only about them, not acids and bases.

As for titrations, I have no idea charco has to answer because I thought they were only used to find the exact amount/volume of reagent needed to react, by using indicators etc.

Oh and I'm not 100% sure adding "any" base to any acid will create a salt, but it probably will, thinking back to GCSE, that was te general equation yeah. And even now I'm pretty sure any acid such as carboxylic acids will stil produce salts

EDIT: Sorry if this has confused you

EDIT 2:Just realized that I haven't read the question. NO adding any metal to any base will not produce a salt. There are unreactive metals

EDIT 3: Can you give me a specific question, I feel like I'm not helping at all because I dont know the question....
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Alexis1729
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(Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
In your question you talked about metal-base reactions, so I thought that maybe you were asking only about them, not acids and bases.

As for titrations, I have no idea charco has to answer because I thought they were only used to find the exact amount/volume of reagent needed to react, by using indicators etc.

Oh and I'm not 100% sure adding "any" base to any acid will create a salt, but it probably will, thinking back to GCSE, that was te general equation yeah. And even now I'm pretty sure any acid such as carboxylic acids will stil produce salts

EDIT: Sorry if this has confused you

EDIT 2:Just realized that I haven't read the question. NO adding any metal to any base will not produce a salt. There are unreactive metals

EDIT 3: Can you give me a specific question, I feel like I'm not helping at all because I dont know the question....
My problem is that I don't really know what method should be used when. I haven't come across a question yet though. Would you know a site where I can revise the preparation of salts?
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charco
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(Original post by Alexis1729)
My problem is that I don't really know what method should be used when. I haven't come across a question yet though. Would you know a site where I can revise the preparation of salts?
There are several methods that can prepare salts:

1. Soluble acid + soluble base by titration (neutralisation)
2. Acid + excess insoluble base, filter and evaporate (neutralisation)
3. Acid + reactive metal (this is a redox reaction)
4. Insoluble salts can be made by precipitation
5. Direct synthesis by reacting elements.

You would choose your method according to circumstances.

Incidentally the only reaction between a metal and a base is aluminium and sodium or potassium hydroxide (which makes sodium or potassium aluminate + hydrogen)
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