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    AQA IGCSE Chemistry

    I have just entered myself for the May/June examination series, I''ll be sitting the exams at a local secondary school.

    Who else is entered for AQA IGCSE Chemistry?
    Who else has sat AQA IGCSE Chemistry exams, If so what tips would you give me? and other candidates?

    My personal tips,

    Make sure you are equipt with an AQA IGCSE Chemistry textbook. Do loads of textbook questions, Watch AQA IGCSE Chemistry videos, make lots of notes. Regularly go through your notes and update them if possible, regularly do practice exam questions and when you are ready do some practice exam papers.
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    (Original post by SmiggleWiggle)
    AQA IGCSE Chemistry

    I have just entered myself for the May/June examination series, I''ll be sitting the exams at a local secondary school.

    Who else is entered for AQA IGCSE Chemistry?
    Who else has sat AQA IGCSE Chemistry exams, If so what tips would you give me? and other candidates?

    My personal tips,

    Make sure you are equipt with an AQA IGCSE Chemistry textbook. Do loads of textbook questions, Watch AQA IGCSE Chemistry videos, make lots of notes. Regularly go through your notes and update them if possible, regularly do practice exam questions and when you are ready do some practice exam papers.

    I just have the revision guide is this enough? Which grade are you aiming for and is aqa igcse chemistry more difficult than gcse?
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    (Original post by ThatLibrarykid)
    I just have the revision guide is this enough? Which grade are you aiming for and is aqa igcse chemistry more difficult than gcse?
    It depends whether you are self-teaching or not. Are you making time for practice exam papers, also have you watched any AQA IGCSE Chemistry videos?
    I'm going for the A* I may do a practice exam paper this weekend as this will give me a good indication as to where I'm at

    I would say it's similar, although there is the addition of some new topics
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    (Original post by SmiggleWiggle)
    It depends whether you are self-teaching or not. Are you making time for practice exam papers, also have you watched any AQA IGCSE Chemistry videos?
    I'm going for the A* I may do a practice exam paper this weekend as this will give me a good indication as to where I'm at

    I would say it's similar, although there is the addition of some new topics
    I haven't I'm really struggling to cram everything in atm as im doing 9 IGCSE subjects. How did your exampaper go and I will try to watch some today after dinner :cool: I will have a go at an exampaper this week but I'm honestly terrified as this IGCSE chemistry is very tricky xD
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    Where do you find the specific AQA iGCSE Chemistry videos please?
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    (Original post by ThatLibrarykid)
    I haven't I'm really struggling to cram everything in atm as im doing 9 IGCSE subjects. How did your exampaper go and I will try to watch some today after dinner :cool: I will have a go at an exampaper this week but I'm honestly terrified as this IGCSE chemistry is very tricky xD
    Understandable, I'm doing a combination of 12 GCSE's

    My score was 79/90 for the May 2013 paper 1 a secure A*,although I felt I'd made some silly errors I'll sit paper 2 this saturday morning.

    (Original post by iniajayo)
    Where do you find the specific AQA iGCSE Chemistry videos please?
    On youtube
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    Thank you however as in what exactly. The ones I've found are tailored towards Edexcel.
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    (Original post by iniajayo)
    Thank you however as in what exactly. The ones I've found are tailored towards Edexcel.
    It's the aqa igcse chemistry videos
    I've left the link below. They don't cover all the topics, the fundamentals are covered though 🙂
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=tRBg6ta1zmw

    How are you finding the topics?
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    (Original post by iniajayo)
    Thank you however as in what exactly. The ones I've found are tailored towards Edexcel.
    hey can you name the ones tailored towards edexcel im doing edxecl please

    thanks
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    I did my paper last night, my mum marked me at 64/90
    The questions I struggled at were 3 (a.) what is the name of the process in part 1?

    3(b.) What was added in part 2?

    3 (b.) II Nanoparticles are only needed in small amounts explain why?

    4 (b) II Describe a method for making pure chrystals of magnesium chloride, from magnesium and hydrochloric acid


    7 (b.) I how does the half equation show that copper has oxidised?
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    (Original post by ThatLibrarykid)
    I did my paper last night, my mum marked me at 64/90
    The questions I struggled at were 3 (a.) what is the name of the process in part 1?

    3(b.) What was added in part 2?

    3 (b.) II Nanoparticles are only needed in small amounts explain why?

    4 (b) II Describe a method for making pure chrystals of magnesium chloride, from magnesium and hydrochloric acid


    7 (b.) I how does the half equation show that copper has oxidised?
    I'm in an English literature revision class atm so I'll just answer one question for now. Be sure to have guidance later 🙂


    Nanoparticles are very small, precisely (10-9 power metres) hence the name nano is derived from 9. Their small sizes give them large surface areas, so they may only be required in small amounts.
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    (Original post by Maz_001)
    hey can you name the ones tailored towards edexcel im doing edxecl please

    thanks

    I really don't know, it's probably best to search the edexcel topics in youtube
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    I think you did the 2015 paper?

    3 (a.) What is the name of the process in part 1. Solid particles are removed in filtration. ( I believe filteration is the case in this question, although sedimentation is also a key process in water quality)

    3(b.) What was added in part 2? Chlorine is added to kill microbes

    4 (b) II Describe a method for making pure chrystals of magnesium chloride, from magnesium and hydrochloric acid (Is this a 3 marker or 6 marker?)




    First I'd carefully pour a quantity of Hydrochloric acid in to a beaker. I'd make an aqueous solution of Hydrochloric Acid. I would cut up small pieces of magnesium ribbon and them into the beaker one by one, until the effervescence comes to a cease.
    I would use filter paper to filter the magnesium. I would then pour the solution into a dish and place heat below using a Bunsen burner. I appreciate the transfer of thermal energy, I then leave the solution to crystalize whilst the water evaporates simultaneously. Finally I would filter the Magnesium Chloride crystals
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    The copper atoms are at the anode so, the copper atoms lose electrons form ions. This is oxidation.

    The half equation the represent this would be

    Cu(s) to Cu(aq)2+ 2 e-
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    (Original post by SmiggleWiggle)
    I think you did the 2015 paper?

    3 (a.) What is the name of the process in part 1. Solid particles are removed in filtration. ( I believe filteration is the case in this question, although sedimentation is also a key process in water quality)

    3(b.) What was added in part 2? Chlorine is added to kill microbes

    4 (b) II Describe a method for making pure chrystals of magnesium chloride, from magnesium and hydrochloric acid (Is this a 3 marker or 6 marker?)




    First I'd carefully pour a quantity of Hydrochloric acid in to a beaker. I'd make an aqueous solution of Hydrochloric Acid. I would cut up small pieces of magnesium ribbon and them into the beaker one by one, until the effervescence comes to a cease.
    I would use filter paper to filter the magnesium. I would then pour the solution into a dish and place heat below using a Bunsen burner. I appreciate the transfer of thermal energy, I then leave the solution to crystalize whilst the water evaporates simultaneously. Finally I would filter the Magnesium Chloride crystals
    Thank you so much you've been a great help, I thought question 4 B (ii) Would have been a neutralisation reaction and can you explain what is meant by the products of electrolysis. How did your exam paper two go? I think i need some time for revision before I try the second exam paper practice

    How are you at Gas Chromatography? What are the conditions needed for the production of Ammonia? I also need help on exothermic and endothermic reactions, I don't seem to be able to distinguish the differences!
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    (Original post by ThatLibrarykid)
    Thank you so much you've been a great help, I thought question 4 B (ii) Would have been a neutralisation reaction and can you explain what is meant by the products of electrolysis. How did your exam paper two go? I think i need some time for revision before I try the second exam paper practice

    How are you at Gas Chromatography? What are the conditions needed for the production of Ammonia? I also need help on exothermic and endothermic reactions, I don't seem to be able to distinguish the differences!
    No, the reaction is not a neutralisation reaction, as there is no base to react with the hydrochloric acid.

    Well, as you know the oxidation of ions or neutral molecules occurs at the anode, The reduction of the ions or neutral molecules occurs at the cathode. Fe(CN)3-, 6. + e- -> Fe (CN) 4- 6 (I will add a photo of my workings in this example of the reduction of ferricynanide ions)
    With ionic compounds it's a case of what ions, will the salt break down to.

    Gas Chromatography involves a sample being vapourised, without decomposing; the sample is then injected into a column where the gas is detected. The coloum is packed with solid particles, the compounds travel at different speeds and thus come out at different times. The time it takes for a compenent in a mixture to pass through the column is what we call the retention time. The retention times can be comapred with the results for the known compounds, to help denote the unknown compounds.

    The retention factor can be worked out as the distance the spot travels up the paper by the distance the solvent travels.

    The conditions needed for Ammonia production (N2 (g) + 3H2 (g)-> <- 2Nh3 (g) are a pressure of around 200 atmospheres (atm) a temperature of around 450c and an iron catalyst
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    (Original post by SmiggleWiggle)
    No, the reaction is not a neutralisation reaction, as there is no base to react with the hydrochloric acid.

    Well, as you know the oxidation of ions or neutral molecules occurs at the anode, The reduction of the ions or neutral molecules occurs at the cathode. Fe(CN)3-, 6. + e- -> Fe (CN) 4- 6 (I will add a photo of my workings in this example of the reduction of ferricynanide ions)
    With ionic compounds it's a case of what ions, will the salt break down to.

    Gas Chromatography involves a sample being vapourised, without decomposing; the sample is then injected into a column where the gas is detected. The coloum is packed with solid particles, the compounds travel at different speeds and thus come out at different times. The time it takes for a compenent in a mixture to pass through the column is what we call the retention time. The retention times can be comapred with the results for the known compounds, to help denote the unknown compounds.

    The retention factor can be worked out as the distance the spot travels up the paper by the distance the solvent travels.

    The conditions needed for Ammonia production (N2 (g) + 3H2 (g)-> <- 2Nh3 (g) are a pressure of around 200 atmospheres (atm) a temperature of around 450c and an iron catalyst
    Ok, so the products of electrolysis must always be oxidations of ions at the anode and reduction of ions at the cathode. This has been a big help, I'm still not sure on exothermic and endothermic reactions

    I don't think you told me how your pastpaper went? Is there just one known specific catalyst for ammonia production?
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    (Original post by ThatLibrarykid)
    Ok, so the products of electrolysis must always be oxidations of ions at the anode and reduction of ions at the cathode. This has been a big help, I'm still not sure on exothermic and endothermic reactions

    I don't think you told me how your pastpaper went? Is there just one known specific catalyst for ammonia production?

    For the june 2013 AQA IGCSE Chemistry paper my score was 77/90 It was quite a difficult paper tbh and I am satisfied with my score, as it was a high A*. The most notable is Iron, which I think is extracted (and reduced ) from Magnetite as Magnetite is very pure.

    Exothermic reactions transfer energy from to the surroundings, this often results in an increase in the temperature of surroundings. Combustion is a good example of an Exothermic reaction. In bond dissocation energy calculations, (of which you should have come across, exam paper 2
    *hint* *hint*) the sum would be negative for exothermic reactions, this shows that bonds are made.

    Endothermic reactions take in energy from the surroundings, which often results in a decrease in the temperature of surroundings. Thermal Decomposition is a good example. Bonds are broken in endothermic reactions.
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    In an exothermic reaction, the energy released from forming new bonds is greater than the energy
    needed to break existing bonds, In an endothermic reaction, the energy needed to break existing bonds is greater than the energy released from forming new bonds.
    I hope this helps
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    How did ya'll find the AQA IGCSE Chemistry paper one? I think I performed quite well, I'm thinking A low to mid A*
    Perhaps I can do something special in paper two, I heard someone scored all marks!
 
 
 
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