This discussion is closed.
lonelystudent123
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
So I'm in second year of dental school (I'd rather not say where) and I want to leave, I'm really not enjoying the course like I thought I would.
I wanted to drop out in first year as well but decided to stick it out because "it gets better" (so I was told), however I still want to leave.
Yes, it sounds lame but I am too scared to ask anyone for advice in person so here I am posting my thoughts online.
I understand how much effort it was to get here and I don't know if second year is too late to change course? (i'm not thinking about leaving university altogether)
If anyone else has been in the same position as me, what did you do?
0
redhelen
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
If you know it's not for you then change. Horses for courses and all that. Start looking into other options now - if you got the grades for dentistry then you will have a lot of doors open to you for pther uni courses.


Just one thing - have you had much patient contact? If not maybe you would enjoy it more once you do?
0
lonelystudent123
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by redhelen)
If you know it's not for you then change. Horses for courses and all that. Start looking into other options now - if you got the grades for dentistry then you will have a lot of doors open to you for pther uni courses.


Just one thing - have you had much patient contact? If not maybe you would enjoy it more once you do?
Thanks for your advice and no I haven't had much patient contact yet, I think I'll have to wait until feb/march time for that. I think I would enjoy the patient interaction, but I mean in most jobs you get to work with other people right?
Might send some emails to tutors of other courses, I guess I'm just too scared of making the same mistake twice and then have an even harder time finding a job than I would as a dentist
0
malaysian dentist
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
Patient contact could be the game changer. Having said that, there are other career options in dentistry that does not involve patienty contact. I myself do not enjoy treating patients on the chair. After 3 years in practice I decided to get into teaching & research in forensic odontology and I'm enjoying it a lot more.

It is important for you to know what you actually like, and if you are able to keep doing it for the next 30-35 years. If you happen to not like dentistry in general, my advice is for you to leave and do something else that excites you more.
1
lonelystudent123
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by malaysian dentist)
Patient contact could be the game changer. Having said that, there are other career options in dentistry that does not involve patienty contact. I myself do not enjoy treating patients on the chair. After 3 years in practice I decided to get into teaching & research in forensic odontology and I'm enjoying it a lot more.

It is important for you to know what you actually like, and if you are able to keep doing it for the next 30-35 years. If you happen to not like dentistry in general, my advice is for you to leave and do something else that excites you more.
Hi sorry for such a late response, thank you for your reply could I ask how you found dental school? And what was your experience moving into teaching?
0
malaysian dentist
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by lonelystudent123)
Hi sorry for such a late response, thank you for your reply could I ask how you found dental school? And what was your experience moving into teaching?
I found dental school to be tough, to be perfectly honest, both theoretical and practical. However, as long as you are on top with your revision and you get everything that needs to be done with your patients within the stipulated time (the requirements etc) you should survive dental school. Teaching has been wonderful (I am back in Malaysia), you are not exactly bound to the 8-5 working hours and that helps a lot especially if you dislike routines, like myself. I don't do much clinical anymore except when I am supervising the third and fourth year students (the best part for me). However you have to be into research and the teaching bit itself. For now I don't think I will be going anywhere other than teaching.
0
lonelystudent123
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by malaysian dentist)
I found dental school to be tough, to be perfectly honest, both theoretical and practical. However, as long as you are on top with your revision and you get everything that needs to be done with your patients within the stipulated time (the requirements etc) you should survive dental school. Teaching has been wonderful (I am back in Malaysia), you are not exactly bound to the 8-5 working hours and that helps a lot especially if you dislike routines, like myself. I don't do much clinical anymore except when I am supervising the third and fourth year students (the best part for me). However you have to be into research and the teaching bit itself. For now I don't think I will be going anywhere other than teaching.
When you say you found it tough, do you mean difficult to grasp/academically tough or tough like testing on your tolerance/patience? Personally, I've found it to be the latter..
Others at my dental school say the work (especially this year when we've been doing fillings etc on phantom heads) is difficult too so I am unsure if to stick it out if we're all in the same situation?
Teaching sounds great , especially supervising students, I may consider it if the patient contact doesn't work out. Did you do a PhD?
0
malaysian dentist
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
(Original post by lonelystudent123)
When you say you found it tough, do you mean difficult to grasp/academically tough or tough like testing on your tolerance/patience? Personally, I've found it to be the latter..
Others at my dental school say the work (especially this year when we've been doing fillings etc on phantom heads) is difficult too so I am unsure if to stick it out if we're all in the same situation?
Teaching sounds great , especially supervising students, I may consider it if the patient contact doesn't work out. Did you do a PhD?
A little bit of both, actually. I was not as bright as my colleagues (LOL) and had to deal with a lot of cultural differences as well, even after a few years. A couple of clinical tutors treated me like crap, and I am not sure if it was racism (my colleagues actually agreed on this) or purely me not performing up to their standards. But I decided to brush off the negativity and just focus on graduating. It is important to have a little bit of fun as well, and a great support system so you don't feel too depressed most of the time.

You really should not let that get to your head, when people say it is difficult etc as different people have different capabilities. What they find difficult might not be as difficult as you think it is and vice versa. I personally find phantom heads not difficult but rather communicating with patients that is challenging. But if you do it long enough it will definitely get easier, that is what I feel at least.

I am actually applying for a PhD for 2017 entry. Still waiting for a scholarship offer at the moment, then I am in!
0
lonelystudent123
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by malaysian dentist)
A little bit of both, actually. I was not as bright as my colleagues (LOL) and had to deal with a lot of cultural differences as well, even after a few years. A couple of clinical tutors treated me like crap, and I am not sure if it was racism (my colleagues actually agreed on this) or purely me not performing up to their standards. But I decided to brush off the negativity and just focus on graduating. It is important to have a little bit of fun as well, and a great support system so you don't feel too depressed most of the time.

You really should not let that get to your head, when people say it is difficult etc as different people have different capabilities. What they find difficult might not be as difficult as you think it is and vice versa. I personally find phantom heads not difficult but rather communicating with patients that is challenging. But if you do it long enough it will definitely get easier, that is what I feel at least.

I am actually applying for a PhD for 2017 entry. Still waiting for a scholarship offer at the moment, then I am in!
Crappy tutors never helps, glad you got through it. Did you train in the UK?
Even at the dental school I'm at there's a lot of inconsistency in the tutors (how they treat students and with the standards they expect), which so far I've had decent tutors, but the thought of having some of the not so good ones is not encouraging me to stay on hahaha. I guess we all have to deal with difficult people at some point in life though.
Yeah, the phantom heads has got easier with time, but I wouldn't say I like doing it.
And awesome! What do you plan to do your PhD on? Good luck
0
malaysian dentist
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 years ago
#10
Yes, I trained in one of the London dental schools.
Indeed, there will always be people who are difficult to deal with and there is no point in worrying about things that you cannot change.

I am doing research in forensic odontology. Thanks, and good luck to you too!
0
diobrando
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by lonelystudent123)
Thanks for your advice and no I haven't had much patient contact yet, I think I'll have to wait until feb/march time for that. I think I would enjoy the patient interaction, but I mean in most jobs you get to work with other people right?
Might send some emails to tutors of other courses, I guess I'm just too scared of making the same mistake twice and then have an even harder time finding a job than I would as a dentist
hello,

I recognise im rly late (3 years after all) but I have to ask since im in a similar position right now

Im in first year and although its only been a few months, I'm not enjoying the course - I was mismatched really from the start as I didn't have a level biology but I thought I could suck it up as I liked GCSE biology, but boy was I wrong. but the main reason really why I want to leave is really the workload and the stress...

im finding the workload too large tbh and always stressed when im doing work as you genuinely have to study every day as its easy to fall behind - like super easy..

in short im thinking of applying before the current UCAS cycle ends so I can start skl next September - but im scared of rushing my decision and in the end just picking a course for the sake of it and then come September, find that I just hate it

my parents aren't really helping either as they're pressuring me to apply before January so I dont waste 2 years at home (understandable definitely) but they dont seem to understand that I want to be careful when picking a course and want to pick a course im passionate about.. rn tho I have no aspirations or passion..

sorry for the long message, but in short could you please tell me what you did?
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you experienced financial difficulties as a student due to Covid-19?

Yes, I have really struggled financially (77)
17.99%
I have experienced some financial difficulties (124)
28.97%
I haven't experienced any financial difficulties and things have stayed the same (160)
37.38%
I have had better financial opportunities as a result of the pandemic (54)
12.62%
I've had another experience (let us know in the thread!) (13)
3.04%

Watched Threads

View All