Another your views on the benefit system Watch

Titch89
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#41
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#41
if I was to have a baby, I would make sure I was in the financial position to do so.
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Oddjob39A
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#42
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(Original post by Titch89)
So what about the people who can't work, yet haven't paid any contributions? Or do they just starve and live on the streets?

That is what the Work House is for....JOKE :p:

No, after the level of self sustainence has been passed, then the state has a moral duty to support you, but only in a very minor way and even then; only with vouchers, receipts etc for basic food, clothes and bills.

No 'free cash'

The idea is that of a 'safety net', not a support blanket
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EarlHickey
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#43
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They used to have a good idea but wrongfully implimented that if you worked part time they let you only keep £5 and kept the rest and when you got a full time job they released it, but they scrapped it! I think in part it was the idea that anything over £1000 that was saved dissapeared.

So if you worked 10 hours a week for a year at £5 a hour after tax and earned over 2 grand then started work youd only get 1 grand back!

So they then scrapped the idea.

The benefit system is hugely flawed, it doesnt help those who need a jump start, and lets people live chavs who can stick up for themselves more get cash.

My friend left college summer 2006 then worked over summer but couldnt afford deposit on new place, so had to move back to his parents who lived about 20 miles from nearest town or shop in middle of nowhere, so far out he signed on by post as the nearest jobcentre was about 60 miles away! then in Feburary 2006 asked to move in with me and I said ok, but then got a part time weekend job fast then was fired 3 weeks later(as they said he wasnt good enough) the jobcentre lost his P45 and letter from employer so for over 6 months he lived off £22 a week before bills but they expected him to do a training course and pay transport costs each day and such.

The jobcentre was rude.

Anyway he only sorted it when he was evicted from our flat after I moved as he couldnt pay the rent and was homeless for 2 weeks before being helped by a local charity but they put him in a £90 a week room!

He then went back to sign on with a fresh claim and got a job fast after but as its only 20 hours a week he essentially has no income.

Is that fair?!

Its nothing to do with income as such as circumstances, one person can easily live off £5-£10 a week then someone else in same town wont be able to live off 10 times that

Im the same, at times I have lived off £3 a week, then a few weeks later spent £100 one week and thats holding back.

My spending is psychological, when im happy and have friends round I spend less than when im bored.
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Sapphire_Eyes
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#44
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im on JSA and yes i could of done way more to stop myself from staying off it and i tried.

I didnt pass my A'levels i didnt feel motivated enough and ive got dyslexia and dyslcalculia which means i have problems in english and maths, the second time i tried my gcse maths i went up from foundation to intermediate i tried my dam hardest to get my C for uni but sadly i only managed a D which from a foundation E is a massive step up for me, i got my C in english the first year of college

so i wouldnt of got into the HND anyway even if i passed science. so to avoid getting on the JSA i applied at the age of 19, absolutly gutted i wasnt going to study my favourite subject, without my C and feeling so dam low onto a BTEC nat health diploma hoping if i passed this then with my maths i could do a subject at university from this i.e nursing or speech as on this course you do some work experience so it would of helped loads.

however at the begginning of november i quit, mostly because i felt everyday was a struggle to get up and go in and feeling so low and depressed and suidical. I wasnt ready for this course it had a massive impact esp with my dyslexia. The teachers i found to press on far to much, too quickly.

I sadly then found myself on JSA, however with this money i have, i have used it for job hunting, transport into town to search for jobs and whatever i want i pay or it.

However the job centre has put me on a retail training course which has helped with getting a CV and with an intensive job hunting day, its quite flexible, i did get a job only to find out it was seasonal when i did say perment so im back there again, pretty annoyed. I have to use this money for transport, which is £13 a week, i have to pay for my own dinner and what money i've saved is there ready in case i need it.

I have no desire to stay on JSA, i want to get work experience for many things and then deciede what i want to do, go to uni get on an access course and then onto uni. With hopefully plently of exeperience for the job i want and with good enough grades.

its not what i wanted to happen, but it has, but its taught me about saving money you dont a lot just enough to survive thats it. Transport/food/whatever else you need, you own a car theres your petrol money it has helped me with saving more and spending less.

just because a person is on jsa doesnt always there on it for life. and yes i hate it when 'chavs' get pregnant for the money and flat. im 19 hell i havent popped any and dont intend to until i am settled
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Titch89
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#45
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(Original post by Sapphire_Eyes)
i hate it when 'chavs' get pregnant for the money and flat. im 19 hell i havent popped any and dont intend to until i am settled
They don't get a flat. In order for them to get a flat, they have to be homeless.

Why are there rules like you can only get it if your partners works under a certain amount of hours a week? 3 years ago, my dad was made redundant. Despite working most his life, he got told he wasn't allowed to claim any benefits. He also didn't realise that he was entitled to help with the cost of transport to and from interviews, until he got told just before he was given his driving licence back. (at the time, he wasn't allowed to drive for a medical reason) Almost all mum's money went on the mortgage, so we struggled.
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death.drop
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#46
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(Original post by Photios)
Get rid of the benefits system. How difficult it is to flip a frigging burger at McDonalds? Minimum pay is too much for them. And the McDonalds here is inept. They have one till when there are like 6 people queuing. Are they STUPID? Hire more people who are on benefits. Problem solved.

It's time these people start paying taxes and stop using up our tax that could be used for healthcare.
it's not difficult to flip a burger at Mcdonalds but there aren't always enough jobs. it's not the people who can't find a jobs fault.
minimum pay isn't even enough for a single person to live on if they're under 25 so your statement about it being too much is idiotic.

as for your Mcdonalds being inefficient, that's the people in charge who want maximum profit keeping the amount of staff low. Nothing to do with the staff at your Mcdonalds. How can you criticise the Mcdonalds staff when they are getting the ****tiest jobs available so that they aren't living off benefits? you need them.

your whole post screams that you have no idea what you're talking about when it comes to the benefits people receive and how difficult it can be to find a job.
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Titch89
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#47
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(Original post by Photios)
Get rid of the benefits system. How difficult it is to flip a frigging burger at McDonalds? Minimum pay is too much for them. And the McDonalds here is inept. They have one till when there are like 6 people queuing. Are they STUPID? Hire more people who are on benefits. Problem solved.

It's time these people start paying taxes and stop using up our tax that could be used for healthcare.
What about disabled people? And no, don't tell me they can just go and flip burgers at McDonalds...
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J9127
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#48
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i see benefits as a last resort.
I also believe that everyone who can, has a moral duty to work.
Staying at home and living off other peoples tax money must be demoralising, and is nothing to be proud of, unless you physically can't work, or you are a single parent with dependents.
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zapadlo7821
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#49
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#49
Minimum wage is enough to survive you just have to be sensible with your money. My sister lives in London suburb, goes to college three days a week, works in Mcdonalds for minimum wage,(maximum 25-30 hours a week) does not receive any money from parents and yet manages to survive and even go out on occasional weekend. Furthermore she manages to get all distinctions in her BTEC, as a non-native english speaker.
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death.drop
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#50
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(Original post by zapadlo7821)
Minimum wage is enough to survive you just have to be sensible with your money. My sister lives in London suburb, goes to college three days a week, works in Mcdonalds for minimum wage,(maximum 25-30 hours a week) does not receive any money from parents and yet manages to survive and even go out on occasional weekend. Furthermore she manages to get all distinctions in her BTEC, as a non-native english speaker.
Here's what i said in my other post:
If I was a single person under 25 on minimum wage I would be spending (roughly) £100 a week on rent, £25 a week on council tax, £20 on food, £15 a week travel, £15 a week bills. leaving me with nothing at the end of the week (or in debt). IE - financially as well (or worse) off as on jobseekers but putting in 35 hours a week.

I don't see how any of that is not sensible.
The only cost I could cut down on is travel to and from work but that would involve getting up at 5.30 in order to walk to work before 8am, and frankly I don't think I'd make it to the end of my working day if I did that.

maybe it's different in other areas but where I live it is financially a better option to be on the dole than to be working full time if you're under 25.
still, I don't know why anyone wants to be on the dole. it's really boring & personally I enjoy working.
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zapadlo7821
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#51
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(Original post by death.drop)
Here's what i said in my other post:
If I was a single person under 25 on minimum wage I would be spending (roughly) £100 a week on rent, £25 a week on council tax, £20 on food, £15 a week travel, £15 a week bills. leaving me with nothing at the end of the week (or in debt). IE - financially as well (or worse) off as on jobseekers but putting in 35 hours a week.

I don't see how any of that is not sensible.
The only cost I could cut down on is travel to and from work but that would involve getting up at 5.30 in order to walk to work before 8am, and frankly I don't think I'd make it to the end of my working day if I did that.

maybe it's different in other areas but where I live it is financially a better option to be on the dole than to be working full time if you're under 25.
still, I don't know why anyone wants to be on the dole. it's really boring & personally I enjoy working.
I am getting your point about being financially better off by taking benefits. And it's true my sister doesn't have to travel, allthough she moved her house to be in this position, (saving 15 quid a week).

Just of interest, where do you live, because 100 pounds a week sounds a lot,suggesting you were renting your own studio flat, which is a bit of luxury considering your income at that time. ..
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wordsearch
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#52
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I hate that the media assumes that everybody on the benefit system is lazy. I was on job seekers for six months before I went back to university, and I was certainly not lazy. I applied for absolutely everything under the sun, however the lower level places such as supermarkets simply weren't hiring and as I didn't have any experience I couldn't get anywhere else although I still tried applying. I spent the whole time volunteering at charity stores and doing night courses, but still my lack of proper experience meant I couldn't get anything.

Naturally, as soon as I started university again, three places ended up contacting me out of the blue.
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AT82
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#53
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Has anybody noticed its often the rich that seem to detest the benefit system? Even though they probably have no idea the effects if benefits were canceled.

Most people I know have been on JSA at some point, they are not lazy, it is just hard to find jobs soon after university.
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death.drop
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#54
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(Original post by zapadlo7821)
I am getting your point about being financially better off by taking benefits. And it's true my sister doesn't have to travel, allthough she moved her house to be in this position, (saving 15 quid a week).

Just of interest, where do you live, because 100 pounds a week sounds a lot,suggesting you were renting your own studio flat, which is a bit of luxury considering your income at that time. ..
on the somerset coast, £100 a week is for a tiny flat with a bedroom, kitchen and bathroom but there's only one bedsit in the town where i live and that's provided by the council for the homeless.
I've never actually moved out alone but i know those would be the costs from when i was thinking about it. At the moment i'm living with my boyfriend in cheltenham and i know it would be a bit more affordable to live here if you're single.

Thing is, when you get to 25 and can claim extra money to help with your living costs, making it more affordable. Personally i think it's pretty unfair seeing as a lot of people will leave education at 16 or 18.

and I agree with AT82, it's often people who have never lived alone and have wealthy parents that say the benefit system should be scrapped.
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