Can I be a midwife without science A-Levels? Watch

Cupcake21T
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I have just started year 12 and I am doing English Literature, Geography and Sociology for A-levels and I really want to be a midwife. I’ve checked university requirements and they don’t specify what A levels you have to do. For example it only says AAB etc. So with these A levels can I be a midwife or will it be difficult for me without studying science?
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999tigger
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(Original post by Cupcake21T)
I have just started year 12 and I am doing English Literature, Geography and Sociology for A-levels and I really want to be a midwife. I’ve checked university requirements and they don’t specify what A levels you have to do. For example it only says AAB etc. So with these A levels can I be a midwife or will it be difficult for me without studying science?
You normally need one science.
Health and social care might be sufficient.
Care to link some of the unis you are looking at?

Normally they want one science but if you have found ones that dont have that requirement, then I suppose its ok, but am surprised.
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Cupcake21T
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https://www.gre.ac.uk/undergraduate-...ifery-bsc-hons

https://www.city.ac.uk/study/courses...ey-information
https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcse...rofile/midwife

UCAS says that one science or health related subject is needed at a-level but I just went on google to see if Sociology is a science and apparently it is. Correct me if I’m wrong!
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RuthiePeg
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(Original post by Cupcake21T)
I have just started year 12 and I am doing English Literature, Geography and Sociology for A-levels and I really want to be a midwife. I’ve checked university requirements and they don’t specify what A levels you have to do. For example it only says AAB etc. So with these A levels can I be a midwife or will it be difficult for me without studying science?
As far as I was aware you don't need a science qualification, but I guess it couldn't hurt. I was a mature student and had no science A' Levels....but I guess 20 years of working life was enough 'science of life'. I would suggest looking at a few university entry requirements for Midwifery.
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ChameleonRun
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(Original post by Cupcake21T)
I have just started year 12 and I am doing English Literature, Geography and Sociology for A-levels and I really want to be a midwife. I’ve checked university requirements and they don’t specify what A levels you have to do. For example it only says AAB etc. So with these A levels can I be a midwife or will it be difficult for me without studying science?
yes it says

ABB including a science (e.g. Biology or Chemistry). Applicants who are not studying biology or chemistry A level may apply if they are studying another relevant subject (e.g. Psychology, Sociology or Geography).


https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...course-profile
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EmmaJCummings
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hey, I used to think this too just before I started college. I rang a university and they said that what I picked (health and social care and psychology) would definitely be good enough, I'd love to be a midwife in the future. Its more about the UCAS points really, to be a midwife you need 112-128 UCAS points which is the equivalent to an A and 2 Bs in your A-levels.
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Cupcake21T
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(Original post by EmmaJCummings)
hey, I used to think this too just before I started college. I rang a university and they said that what I picked (health and social care and psychology) would definitely be good enough, I'd love to be a midwife in the future. Its more about the UCAS points really, to be a midwife you need 112-128 UCAS points which is the equivalent to an A and 2 Bs in your A-levels.
Thanks for letting me know!
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RuthiePeg
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(Original post by Cupcake21T)
Thanks for letting me know!
Ah sorry for mis-informing you.
Perhaps it's different for a mature student.
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Cupcake21T
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(Original post by RuthiePeg)
As far as I was aware you don't need a science qualification, but I guess it couldn't hurt. I was a mature student and had no science A' Levels....but I guess 20 years of working life was enough 'science of life'. I would suggest looking at a few university entry requirements for Midwifery.
As you have had the experience for many years now, it’d be really nice to hear the ins and outs of midwifery! What’s it like? Is it hard to have a social life? Basically tell me everything from the start! I’d really like to know
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RuthiePeg
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(Original post by Cupcake21T)
As you have had the experience for many years now, it’d be really nice to hear the ins and outs of midwifery! What’s it like? Is it hard to have a social life? Basically tell me everything from the start! I’d really like to know
I really wish i could give you all the ins and outs but i had to discontinue after 1.5 years as found out i was expecting etc and then moved out of area and could not continue at the same university.

5 years on and I have reapplied (last week) to start the programme from scratch - Yes the desire to become a Midwife is still that strong that I am will to start again. Plus my original 2012 cohort have all graduated and love their jobs - and tell me it was everything they hoped for and more. Yes there are tough days - but they are few and far between.

However the first 1.5years were amazing - Hard due to the 40 hours a week on placement or in the taught part of the programme.
First year was very much focussed on 'normality' and also covers all the basics of anatomy and physilogy - we had a lot of joint lectures with the nurses as it was all generic medical information. Placements i covered were commmunity (twice) Midwifery led unit and antenatal and postnatal ward. I also had a placement on the Obs and Gynae ward (which was eye opening - and reinforced the fact that I did not want to ever do general nursing - they need more medals and recognition for what they have to deal with).

Most of the mentor midwifes are absolute legends. You do come across some that probably shouldn't be in the profession anymore as the passion has gone - but having said that, they are a fountain of knowledge and missed nothing.

Social life whilst a student - The girls all managed to have one. There are society dos and lots of the girls joined other uni societies as well. I was a mature student (even back then) and couldn't hack the pace - but i'm sure you will be fine.

I would say don't even attempt a 12 hour shift on Labour ward with a hangover - they will spot it a mile off and you will probably spew when you get a wiff of placenta/poo/amniotic fluid. Lol.

Get comfy shoes...even the comfiest ones leave your feet screaming at the end of the day. Get some non- prescription glasses to wear in the delivery suite - stops the array of fluids hitting you in the eyes. Keep your mouth closed when down the game end and a woman is pushing.

If you feel faint...say and then stand against a wall - one of my cohort fell backwards against a curtain in the delivery suite on her first delivery - she was dragged out by one of the other midwives. The last thing the midwife needs is you with a split head or sprawled cross a labouring woman.

Never forget the father in the room. They often feel like a spare part. Especially in an emergency situation. You, as a student midwife, are perfectly positioned to offer a reassuring voice when everyone else is rallying round the mother. I've seen a father handed a baby seconds after delivery and the whole room clear out and up to surgery with the mother. The father was left in shock. No one thought to explain it was for a little bleed that needs stitching asap and that... always consider people 'left holding the baby' if you can.

Always ask WHY? make sure you understand the reasons for the treatment taking place.
If you can't feel/hear/see what you are being told you should be able to feel/hear/see, do not ever pretend you can.

Work hard, but make sure you use your rest days to your advantage. it'll be a hard slog, but you don't want to miss out on the student life as a consequence. You won't get as much holiday as the other students - so plan what you do with that time well and enjoy yourself.

I hope that answers some of your queries. anything more specific, let me know.
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EmmaJCummings
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(Original post by RuthiePeg)
I really wish i could give you all the ins and outs but i had to discontinue after 1.5 years as found out i was expecting etc and then moved out of area and could not continue at the same university.

5 years on and I have reapplied (last week) to start the programme from scratch - Yes the desire to become a Midwife is still that strong that I am will to start again. Plus my original 2012 cohort have all graduated and love their jobs - and tell me it was everything they hoped for and more. Yes there are tough days - but they are few and far between.

However the first 1.5years were amazing - Hard due to the 40 hours a week on placement or in the taught part of the programme.
First year was very much focussed on 'normality' and also covers all the basics of anatomy and physilogy - we had a lot of joint lectures with the nurses as it was all generic medical information. Placements i covered were commmunity (twice) Midwifery led unit and antenatal and postnatal ward. I also had a placement on the Obs and Gynae ward (which was eye opening - and reinforced the fact that I did not want to ever do general nursing - they need more medals and recognition for what they have to deal with).

Most of the mentor midwifes are absolute legends. You do come across some that probably shouldn't be in the profession anymore as the passion has gone - but having said that, they are a fountain of knowledge and missed nothing.

Social life whilst a student - The girls all managed to have one. There are society dos and lots of the girls joined other uni societies as well. I was a mature student (even back then) and couldn't hack the pace - but i'm sure you will be fine.

I would say don't even attempt a 12 hour shift on Labour ward with a hangover - they will spot it a mile off and you will probably spew when you get a wiff of placenta/poo/amniotic fluid. Lol.

Get comfy shoes...even the comfiest ones leave your feet screaming at the end of the day. Get some non- prescription glasses to wear in the delivery suite - stops the array of fluids hitting you in the eyes. Keep your mouth closed when down the game end and a woman is pushing.

If you feel faint...say and then stand against a wall - one of my cohort fell backwards against a curtain in the delivery suite on her first delivery - she was dragged out by one of the other midwives. The last thing the midwife needs is you with a split head or sprawled cross a labouring woman.

Never forget the father in the room. They often feel like a spare part. Especially in an emergency situation. You, as a student midwife, are perfectly positioned to offer a reassuring voice when everyone else is rallying round the mother. I've seen a father handed a baby seconds after delivery and the whole room clear out and up to surgery with the mother. The father was left in shock. No one thought to explain it was for a little bleed that needs stitching asap and that... always consider people 'left holding the baby' if you can.

Always ask WHY? make sure you understand the reasons for the treatment taking place.
If you can't feel/hear/see what you are being told you should be able to feel/hear/see, do not ever pretend you can.

Work hard, but make sure you use your rest days to your advantage. it'll be a hard slog, but you don't want to miss out on the student life as a consequence. You won't get as much holiday as the other students - so plan what you do with that time well and enjoy yourself.

I hope that answers some of your queries. anything more specific, let me know.
hey, how was the training to become a midwife and is it a mixture of coursework and exam or is it just exam?
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Elorajaneamos
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I know a girl who got on to a nursing degree with just a double health and social A-level award with grades CC. I also know another girl who also took double health and social A-level and then did a year in college (access course) and then went on to do midwifery at university. If they do accept health and social I would recommend the double award, its definitely one of the easier A-levels.
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RuthiePeg
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(Original post by EmmaJCummings)
hey, how was the training to become a midwife and is it a mixture of coursework and exam or is it just exam?
It's a mixture of Exams, Essays/Coursework and Portfolio work.
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Cupcake21T
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(Original post by RuthiePeg)
I really wish i could give you all the ins and outs but i had to discontinue after 1.5 years as found out i was expecting etc and then moved out of area and could not continue at the same university.

5 years on and I have reapplied (last week) to start the programme from scratch - Yes the desire to become a Midwife is still that strong that I am will to start again. Plus my original 2012 cohort have all graduated and love their jobs - and tell me it was everything they hoped for and more. Yes there are tough days - but they are few and far between.

However the first 1.5years were amazing - Hard due to the 40 hours a week on placement or in the taught part of the programme.
First year was very much focussed on 'normality' and also covers all the basics of anatomy and physilogy - we had a lot of joint lectures with the nurses as it was all generic medical information. Placements i covered were commmunity (twice) Midwifery led unit and antenatal and postnatal ward. I also had a placement on the Obs and Gynae ward (which was eye opening - and reinforced the fact that I did not want to ever do general nursing - they need more medals and recognition for what they have to deal with).

Most of the mentor midwifes are absolute legends. You do come across some that probably shouldn't be in the profession anymore as the passion has gone - but having said that, they are a fountain of knowledge and missed nothing.

Social life whilst a student - The girls all managed to have one. There are society dos and lots of the girls joined other uni societies as well. I was a mature student (even back then) and couldn't hack the pace - but i'm sure you will be fine.

I would say don't even attempt a 12 hour shift on Labour ward with a hangover - they will spot it a mile off and you will probably spew when you get a wiff of placenta/poo/amniotic fluid. Lol.

Get comfy shoes...even the comfiest ones leave your feet screaming at the end of the day. Get some non- prescription glasses to wear in the delivery suite - stops the array of fluids hitting you in the eyes. Keep your mouth closed when down the game end and a woman is pushing.

If you feel faint...say and then stand against a wall - one of my cohort fell backwards against a curtain in the delivery suite on her first delivery - she was dragged out by one of the other midwives. The last thing the midwife needs is you with a split head or sprawled cross a labouring woman.

Never forget the father in the room. They often feel like a spare part. Especially in an emergency situation. You, as a student midwife, are perfectly positioned to offer a reassuring voice when everyone else is rallying round the mother. I've seen a father handed a baby seconds after delivery and the whole room clear out and up to surgery with the mother. The father was left in shock. No one thought to explain it was for a little bleed that needs stitching asap and that... always consider people 'left holding the baby' if you can.

Always ask WHY? make sure you understand the reasons for the treatment taking place.
If you can't feel/hear/see what you are being told you should be able to feel/hear/see, do not ever pretend you can.

Work hard, but make sure you use your rest days to your advantage. it'll be a hard slog, but you don't want to miss out on the student life as a consequence. You won't get as much holiday as the other students - so plan what you do with that time well and enjoy yourself.

I hope that answers some of your queries. anything more specific, let me know.
Thanks for your time. What’s the pay like? And is it a rewarding career?
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Allyson90
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(Original post by Cupcake21T)
I have just started year 12 and I am doing English Literature, Geography and Sociology for A-levels and I really want to be a midwife. I’ve checked university requirements and they don’t specify what A levels you have to do. For example it only says AAB etc. So with these A levels can I be a midwife or will it be difficult for me without studying science?
Hi there

Depending on which university you are going to you may need a "science subject for to do midwifing" - as RuthiPeg said try and look up on various universities website for exactly what required at that particular one ( if you have health and social care @ level 3 then that may be accepted at majority of universities ).

Each part of UK has there own entry levels for this so its best to check what required ok.
Midwifing is a mixture of exams / lectures at university / portfolio work / essays / coursework and long 12 hours shifts on placement.
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Allyson90
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(Original post by Cupcake21T)
Thanks for your time. What’s the pay like? And is it a rewarding career?
I can only speak for the scottish nurses / midwifes - as a band 5 nurse my starting pay is approx £30,200 at top of band 5, plus additional £3,500 for shift allowances - nightshifts and weekend working,
I'm in middle of doing my midwife training and finish this next May/June - the course I'm doing is starting to be phrased out by all health boards throughout the UK due to the amount of qualified nurses they lost to the midwifing side, now when anyone who wants to be a midwife will train only as this, nurses won't be able to apply to do a short course to be a midwife.
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