Sex education at age four? Watch

Garden_Gnome
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7489093.stm

This propsoal is nothing new but what are your opinions?

I don't like it at all. I appreciate that it's sex education and no teaching kids to have sex but is it really necessary? I heard that we should stop "preventing" our children from learning about sex but I don't think this is what some opponents are doing, I certainly don't want to keep such information from them.

It should be up to the parents. If the child starts asking these questions then, by all means, the parents should answer them and educate the child. It's the job of a parent. But to have these issues forced on them, by the state, at such a young age, whatever happened to childhood innocence?

I don't think this will in any way prevent teenage pregnancy. To give children sex education at seven or eight seems young enough. Also, with respect, the sixteen year old in the article seems thick, or at least very niave (which I suppose many young people are). To not know you can become pregnant by having sex? Her parents should take as much responsibilty.
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flexiblefish
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They do it in the netherlands where they have the lowest teenage pregnancy rates in EU. I would be all up for it, de-taboo the situation, make people comfortable to chat and discuss sex in a learned manner and not just in school yard and one-up-manship ways.

At that age it will not include details it will just be about getting kids used to the concept of saying "penis" "condom" "sex" without being uncomfortable, embarrased or shy...or find it comical. It will just facilitate easier exposure to sex ed in years to come, so that teachers of older children do not have that barrier to get thru.

its a good thing imho
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Nath_england
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This will help greatly, at the moment we have one of the largest teen pregnancy rates. Learning at a young age will help children become more confident and not embarrassed to talk about it at an older age. This
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Garden_Gnome
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Yes, although I agree that the issue shouldn't be taboo why four? You've only just started your primary education at the age. As I said in the earlier posts seven seems early enough to me.
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Scotsman1988
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In the Netherlands some schools start teaching sex education at 6. However, their sex education is much more comprehensive than ours and encompasses both SEX AND RELATIONSHIPS.

In the Netherlands, by the time their teenagers leave school, they have explored much more about SRE than the vast majority of us ever have. They explore relationships in more detail and look at the different sorts of relationships that one might have (friendship, family and partner) and how they differ. They'll also have covered topics that are very controversial in this country such as homosexuality.

The other major difference between Holland and here is that Sex is portrayed as something good and it's all taught in an open, honest and up-front way with a huge emphasis being placed on mutual respect.

Their teenage pregnancy rates are the lowest in Europe as are their rates of Sexually Transmitted Infections.

I agree that four is too young. By about 6 the whole relationships angle should start to be looked at with sex education beginning around age 11.
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LazyLuke
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The OP makes a good point, but so do the subsequent posters. It would take a long time to de-tabooify (look it up) sex but it's inevitable, so why not start it and control it in the classroom?

There's always the risk, though, that it'll become too liberalised. Sex needs to be controlled to a certain extent, as an 'overactive' society encourages a lot of other less-reputable pastimes (there's at least four euphemisms in there).


Flexiblefish: It seems that every Dutch person I know has had sex (safely, granted) before the age of 15, and while I couldn't give you a comparable UK statistic, I can happily say that the Dutch are very comfortable with their sexuality...not that that's a bad thing!
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Nath_england
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In places like the Netherlands they don't teach sex education fully at age 4, its more about relationships and the anatomy at that age.
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flexiblefish
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(Original post by Garden_Gnome)
Yes, although I agree that the issue shouldn't be taboo why four? You've only just started your primary education at the age. As I said in the earlier posts seven seems early enough to me.
well you do not do quantum mechanics or medieval lit, but we still learn that 1+1=2 and the alphabet. It is the basis of bigger things....imagine that we were talking about something relatively complx at school such as redox reactions, you do not just jump straight in at year 11 and plough in, teachers build knowledge up, that is the perpuse of the curriculum.

So with Sex-ed, the same has to be true, early years (4-6) probably get them used to the words and feel comfortable. middle years (7-8) introduce the biology of it all later years (9-11) introduce the emotions. Early secondary introduce STDs and contraception. So by the time they are 13 or so they are fully aware of all the factors, and by then they should feel comfortable to have mature conversations with teachers and parents as they are conditions to sex being normal and human.

The moral taboo is partially to blame for the current teenage pregnancy problem in this country. That needs overhauling, so lets start em young.
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flexiblefish
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(Original post by Nath_england)
In places like the Netherlands they don't teach sex education fully at age 4, its more about relationships and the anatomy at that age.
thats exactly the opint im trying to make, you do not plough in with AIDS, BDSM, affairs, sleeping around...you just introduce the basic concepts, the foundations for future "harder" sex-ed.
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Zerforax
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Maybe its not when they start teaching about sex but how they teach it? I remember how crappy our sex ed lessons were...
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River85
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Well, I went to Catholic schools so sex education was by no means great. Although, having said that, it was probably no worse than most other schools.

At four years old you've only just passed the toddler stage, it's very young....
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flexiblefish
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(Original post by sarforaz)
Maybe its not when they start teaching about sex but how they teach it? I remember how crappy our sex ed lessons were...
damn right. teachers are scared, pupils do not want to see Mrs Attila the Hun, roll a condom on a banana and say "bish-bash-bosh don't have sex its wrong, and if you do you should wear a condom otherwise you'll die". but more than that is needed.

also do not forget parents should take a more active and constructive roll, on the whole i get the impression it is left to hearsay and as can be seen on TSR health and discussion, people get there advice anon online.
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Deep Thought
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I've had the chance to be a teacher assistant for 4-5 year olds. Their comprehension isn't that great, some struggled to pronounce "Race" and "Through", and had trouble remembering several actions to 'dance' to a 1 and a half minute track. how will teaching themsex at 4 be beneficial?

7 sounds alot more reasonable... I think though that there should be more on sex education for 13-14 year olds. The whole procreations module is good, but its simply not enough in my opinion.

EDIT:- yeah definitely need to stop teen pregnancy, i just found out one of my cousins removed has a baby now and she's 18... I'm turning 19 tomorrow and still haven't had a girlfriend lol
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Clefeen
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Age 4? Do children even understand those concepts at that age?

I can just imagine what the child might say if the parent asks what they learnt today when walking home from school, lol.
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~Hazzle*
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The government doesn't seem to realise that school can make little difference, the teenager's environment (friends, parents, general cultural ideas etc.) is the biggest factor, I can't see this having any effect.
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juicyfruit
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Yes they should teach children earlier, but aged 4? Noway!
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Dionysus
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I think 4 is far too young. 8 or 9 is as young as I'd say is sensible.
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Howells
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They don't get actual sex education at 4 apparently, only the relationship side and names of body parts according to the woman on Breakfast today. So it's not like there's a concept to understand - they'll just be taught to point to parts of their anatomy and correctly name them I woulld assume.
I definitely think they should leave the sex education part of the curriculum to Year 3/4 at least though.
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vin
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didnt they do this on south park:wtf?:
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faber niger
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Why not? It's good for children to know how things work; why lie to them? I'd draw the line at practical work though.
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