Combined Degree? Watch

Bitter..Sweet
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#1
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Hey. Iam really interested in doing a combined degree, but does it entail a lot more work? And in your final year do you then have to choose one to fully study?

Does anyone do a combined degree as they could tell me from experience?
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River85
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By combined degree do you meant joint honours? (Usually two subjects together) or combined studies (a flexible programme allowing student to freely select their own modules and study three or four subjects)?

Either way it's no more work, no. It's always going to be the same amount of credits/study time as any other degree (120 credits). For a joint honours you just study half of the subject you otherwise would have done in single honours, if that makes sense?

So instead of doing six philosophy modules (for single honours philosophy) you do three in philosophy and three in politics (for joint honours philpol). It's the same amount of work (combined contact and non-contact hours).
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gillipies
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I do a combined honours degree in English Language and Psychology.

At Aston I believe it's called combined honours if the subjects are from two different depts. and joint honours if they are from the same one.

Like River85 said, no it's no more work at all. Sometimes it's helpful to be doing two subjects if they are related because your knowledge from one subject can help you understand the other if you see what I mean.

Also I like it because if you have a bad week in one subject or aren't enjoying it you always have the other one to look forward to!

I find that sometimes I have less flexibility in getting to choose what modules I do compared to someone doing single honours in either subject but it doesn't really bother me as I'm enjoying what I'm doing anyway!
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Bitter..Sweet
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oo thanks for that. Im considering business and psychology/ or english lit. I suppose psychology would make more sense, but I enjoy English more, though I tend to struggle with essay writing!
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20083
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Yeah, it's a bit more work, simply because you are learning two different things, and you won't be able to transfer the skills learned in one course to another in quite the same extent.
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Nasher and Basher
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I want to study Biology, Economics and History- but most combined degrees are for two courses only ?

Are theses choices too broad ???

Plus, due to being combined, do you lack depth- which employers ''supposedly'' like ?
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20083
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(Original post by Nasher and Basher)
I want to study Biology, Economics and History- but most combined degrees are for two courses only ?

Are theses choices too broad ???

Plus, due to being combined, do you lack depth- which employers ''supposedly'' like ?
This is where I like the Scottish system, you get the benefits of doing multiple subjects, of your choice, and still come out with a normal degree
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gillipies
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(Original post by Nasher and Basher)
I want to study Biology, Economics and History- but most combined degrees are for two courses only ?

Are theses choices too broad ???
Some Unis do let you do three subjects together but most of the time I've found this to be for foreign language degrees (ie you do Spanish, German and French together or something). Your 3 subjects are very different to each other and I'd be surprised if you found somewhere to do all 3 - try the UCAS website though.

You might find somewhere where they let you do 2 of them but take a couple of modules in another subject during your first year or something.
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River85
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Yes, in that case it may be. In most joint honours you're learning related subjects (such as classics and philosopy, archaelogy and ancient history etc.) There's overlap an what you learn in one can be transferred to the other. They require a similar...."mindset" (for want of a better word). Psychology and business aren't the most directly related subjects (English and psychology too, to a lesser extent). But it's still not more work as such.
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River85
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(Original post by Nasher and Basher)
I want to study Biology, Economics and History- but most combined degrees are for two courses only ?

Are theses choices too broad ???

Plus, due to being combined, do you lack depth- which employers ''supposedly'' like ?
Joint honours degrees are usually two subjects, yes. However, you can get combined honours or combined studies degrees. These allow the student to study modules from two, three or (in rare cases) four subjects.
Durham, Newcastle, Exeter (I think) and a few others offer them

Although, on second thoughts, Durham wouldn't really be an option as you're largely restricted to the faculty. Those three subjects cross faculties though. A number of other unis may be OK.

I wouldn't worry too much about employers. If you're OK with studying only a couple of modules in each subject per year that should be all that counts. Combined Honours/Studies degrees are actually quite appealing to employers. You develop a wider range of transferable skills.
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bluelou
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in glamorgan they offer a course where you can combine up to six subjects! iw ould love to do this but is it less respectable to employers than a full on degree?
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River85
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(Original post by bluelou)
in glamorgan they offer a course where you can combine up to six subjects! iw ould love to do this but is it less respectable to employers than a full on degree?
It is a full on degree, as far as I'm aware. Providing it's a full time, three year degree (with 120 credits in each year) it will be the same workload as most other degrees. At least in theory.

I don't know where people get the idea that joint or combined honours are less appealing to employers than a single honours degree. It's just not true.
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