Liam224
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What type of concepts are used in calculus
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Eimmanuel
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Perhaps, it is more related to maths than physics, so it is moved to maths forum.
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Liam224
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(Original post by Eimmanuel)
Perhaps, it is more related to maths than physics, so it is moved to maths forum.
I am asking what calculus concepts are in physics. So this query is related to physics please tell me
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by Liam224)
I am asking what calculus concepts are in physics. So this query is related to physics please tell me
Alright, I move back to the physics forum. In future, make your question clear to avoid ambiguity.

Which level of physics are you referring to? Be clear about your question.
And what level of calculus knowledge are you referring to?
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Stonebridge
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Calculus is everywhere in physics.
As calculus deals with, among other things, rates of change, anywhere in physics where there is change over time or space can be described using calculus.

The most obvious things that come to mind instantly are velocity and acceleration.


  • Velocity is rate of change of displacement with time, and acceleration is rate of change of velocity with time.

If s is displacement then
ds / dt = velocity, v
and dv / dt = acceleration
acceleration = d/dt (ds/dt) = d2s/dt2
There are many other things that vary with time. Here just a few that come to mind that would be studied at A-Level:

  • radioactivity - which has an exponential decay with time
  • the charge on a capacitor as it charges up or discharges - also exponential
  • Newton's Law of Cooling - exponential rate of loss of heat from a hot body
  • Power - rate of transfer of energy with time
  • Rate of change of momentum being equivalent to resultant force.


Things that vary with displacement in space:


  • Electric field strength is equal to (negative) potential gradient
  • Simple harmonic motion where the restoring force (and consequently the acceleration) varies with displacement from the equilibrium position.


There are many more. These are the ones that came to mind as I replied.
Last edited by Stonebridge; 5 months ago
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