International graduate applying to 5 year standard medicine course

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JuliusSeiz25
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Hey everyone! I am worried about my GPA. I did the IB before my bachelors and got 7, 7, 6 for my HLs (Chem, Eco, Bio respectively) with 39 overall. I am in the final year of my degree (in Canada) and have a 3.52/4.00. I have quite a bit of extracurriculars/internships etc. Was wondering if anyone in a similar situation could advice me on my GPA. Thanks
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becausethenight
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This thread may be the best place to ask: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6975180
artful_lounger also has some experience with US/Canadian applicants?
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artful_lounger
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I accidentally pressed the thread page beta button which refreshed the page and deleted my post

In any case, to summarise: your degree is probably roughly equivalent to a 2:1 (a low 2:1 most likely, it might be noted). However your school leaving qualifications should meet any requirements otherwise. So in principle you meet the minimum requirements.

However if you are an international student for fee purposes, then things are different, because there are strict quotas imposed upon medical schools on the number of international students they can take. Therefore, competition for international students applying to medicine in the UK is much higher than for domestic/home applicants (and I gather things are somewhat more competitive for graduate applicants even applying to standard entry courses).

So the issue is, while you minimally meet the requirements, it is only minimally and many international applicants will far exceed those. So while it's possible, you might find you aren't a very competitive applicant, unless you get really outstanding UCAT/BMAT scores or something.
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JuliusSeiz25
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I accidentally pressed the thread page beta button which refreshed the page and deleted my post

In any case, to summarise: your degree is probably roughly equivalent to a 2:1 (a low 2:1 most likely, it might be noted). However your school leaving qualifications should meet any requirements otherwise. So in principle you meet the minimum requirements.

However if you are an international student for fee purposes, then things are different, because there are strict quotas imposed upon medical schools on the number of international students they can take. Therefore, competition for international students applying to medicine in the UK is much higher than for domestic/home applicants (and I gather things are somewhat more competitive for graduate applicants even applying to standard entry courses).

So the issue is, while you minimally meet the requirements, it is only minimally and many international applicants will far exceed those. So while it's possible, you might find you aren't a very competitive applicant, unless you get really outstanding UCAT/BMAT scores or something.
Hey! Thanks for your reply! So do you have any advice on which schools I should apply to then?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by JuliusSeiz25)
Hey! Thanks for your reply! So do you have any advice on which schools I should apply to then?
Not really, they're all going to be very competitive I would expect. I guess avoid ones that seem to be a "brand name" abroad (e.g. Oxbridge, London unis) as those might be more oversubscribed by international students - however that is very much speculation (except for Oxford which I know is more oversubscribed by international students than usual).

It doesn't really matter which medical school you go to as far as training/practicing in the UK (within the NHS that is) goes, as where you went to medical school isn't considered in applications for foundation posts or specialty recruitment (often it's not even included). Of course in other countries only certain medical schools in the UK may be recognised in that country - I don't know if that is the case for Canada. So consider where you want to actually practice medicine in the future (and if it's not the UK I'd suggest not applying to UK medical schools at all and just apply to medical schools in the country you wish to practice in).

nexttime might have some relevant stats or suggestions (and/or corrections on the above speculation!)?
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JuliusSeiz25
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Not really, they're all going to be very competitive I would expect. I guess avoid ones that seem to be a "brand name" abroad (e.g. Oxbridge, London unis) as those might be more oversubscribed by international students - however that is very much speculation (except for Oxford which I know is more oversubscribed by international students than usual).

It doesn't really matter which medical school you go to as far as training/practicing in the UK (within the NHS that is) goes, as where you went to medical school isn't considered in applications for foundation posts or specialty recruitment (often it's not even included). Of course in other countries only certain medical schools in the UK may be recognised in that country - I don't know if that is the case for Canada. So consider where you want to actually practice medicine in the future (and if it's not the UK I'd suggest not applying to UK medical schools at all and just apply to medical schools in the country you wish to practice in).

nexttime might have some relevant stats or suggestions (and/or corrections on the above speculation!)?
Hey thanks for your help. I was wondering if I should focus more on unis that stress more on UCAT/BMAT scores? Do you know any that might be suitable? Im sorry for bothering you so much.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by JuliusSeiz25)
Hey thanks for your help. I was wondering if I should focus more on unis that stress more on UCAT/BMAT scores? Do you know any that might be suitable? Im sorry for bothering you so much.
Probably, you'll need to look at the specific shortlisting methodology each medical school uses though - and I don't know if this is necessarily the same for international students (I know that at least some medical schools have different formats of interview for international students e.g. using a panel interview rather than MMI). There are lots of resources on TSR where people have compiled this information - I would recommend you read through the stickied threads in the medicine forum as most of it is in one or more of those!
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