BrightBlueStar11
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#1
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#1
How do you guys extend a simple single idea into a complex one?

e.g. "Public has a right to unhindered access of information in order to form their own informed decision." - how would you extend such idea? Do you just write it on the spot, or make a plan for each paragraph before write it?
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Anon.stu
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#2
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A method I find easiest with topics like that is to think about the counter argument first, as if you’re having a debate in your head. That way you can figure out what you find the most interesting about the idea.

For your example, what reasons are there as to why the public shouldn’t be given all the information? What could go wrong if everyone knows everything? What makes them think they have the right to know everything? Couldn’t it be argued that sometimes ignorance is bliss, knowing everything may just cause more problems, so is it worth it? Is everyone intelligent enough for us to trust them with so much information? Does unhindered access to information put people like politicians in danger, if we all knew the truth about their decisions and motives? It’s a really interesting philosophical question, I’m getting carried away thinking about the ethics of it haha.

If you can jot down a bunch of arguments and counter arguments you should eventually find a few that make you passionate enough to start writing properly. I prefer to write a draft then keep making changes and adding until I’m happy with it, hope that helps
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BrightBlueStar11
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Anon.stu)
A method I find easiest with topics like that is to think about the counter argument first, as if you’re having a debate in your head. That way you can figure out what you find the most interesting about the idea.

For your example, what reasons are there as to why the public shouldn’t be given all the information? What could go wrong if everyone knows everything? What makes them think they have the right to know everything? Couldn’t it be argued that sometimes ignorance is bliss, knowing everything may just cause more problems, so is it worth it? Is everyone intelligent enough for us to trust them with so much information? Does unhindered access to information put people like politicians in danger, if we all knew the truth about their decisions and motives? It’s a really interesting philosophical question, I’m getting carried away thinking about the ethics of it haha.

If you can jot down a bunch of arguments and counter arguments you should eventually find a few that make you passionate enough to start writing properly. I prefer to write a draft then keep making changes and adding until I’m happy with it, hope that helps
wow thank you for your reply!

I will definitely try that method and see it works!

thanks
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BrightBlueStar11
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Anon.stu)
A method I find easiest with topics like that is to think about the counter argument first, as if you’re having a debate in your head. That way you can figure out what you find the most interesting about the idea.

For your example, what reasons are there as to why the public shouldn’t be given all the information? What could go wrong if everyone knows everything? What makes them think they have the right to know everything? Couldn’t it be argued that sometimes ignorance is bliss, knowing everything may just cause more problems, so is it worth it? Is everyone intelligent enough for us to trust them with so much information? Does unhindered access to information put people like politicians in danger, if we all knew the truth about their decisions and motives? It’s a really interesting philosophical question, I’m getting carried away thinking about the ethics of it haha.

If you can jot down a bunch of arguments and counter arguments you should eventually find a few that make you passionate enough to start writing properly. I prefer to write a draft then keep making changes and adding until I’m happy with it, hope that helps
I used your method, can you let me know if it this is how it works? I used it in the middle of the paragraph where I ran out of topics to write about.



"Reading and writing are basic skills required for so many careers – education opens the doors to further learning. Recent studies have shown that the most important skills for an employment opportunity are critical thinking skills, followed by problem-solving ability which enables you to handle with numerical data. In particular, since reading and writing are the basis behind the realm of critical thinking, it is important to acquire these academic skills in order to open many opportunities. Although, many people argue that certain disciplines such as mathematics do not necessarily require these skills as they put a significant burden on numerical ability. This is not necessarily true because any form of sciences do require high levels of critical thinking and ability to communicate their ideas precisely and establish arguments in a logical skills."



Also, in terms of structure - I used to write it in a P (point), E (evidence), and A (Analysis). However, it seems be not working in such argumentative essay. Is it okay to just write in a chain of reasoning? e.g. reasoning A --> reasoning B --> reasoning C --> conclusion

Many thanks!
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Anon.stu
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#5
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
I used your method, can you let me know if it this is how it works? I used it in the middle of the paragraph where I ran out of topics to write about.



"Reading and writing are basic skills required for so many careers – education opens the doors to further learning. Recent studies have shown that the most important skills for an employment opportunity are critical thinking skills, followed by problem-solving ability which enables you to handle with numerical data. In particular, since reading and writing are the basis behind the realm of critical thinking, it is important to acquire these academic skills in order to open many opportunities. Although, many people argue that certain disciplines such as mathematics do not necessarily require these skills as they put a significant burden on numerical ability. This is not necessarily true because any form of sciences do require high levels of critical thinking and ability to communicate their ideas precisely and establish arguments in a logical skills."



Also, in terms of structure - I used to write it in a P (point), E (evidence), and A (Analysis). However, it seems be not working in such argumentative essay. Is it okay to just write in a chain of reasoning? e.g. reasoning A --> reasoning B --> reasoning C --> conclusion

Many thanks!
That writing’s amazing, really persuasive as well! I’d say a chain of reasoning would work just as well, if not better, for giving an argument, as long as you can still somewhat disprove other arguments that disagree with yours
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BrightBlueStar11
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Anon.stu)
That writing’s amazing, really persuasive as well! I’d say a chain of reasoning would work just as well, if not better, for giving an argument, as long as you can still somewhat disprove other arguments that disagree with yours
Thank you so much for your help!
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