The Student Room Group

University of Veterinary Medicine Budapest

Call to any and all students studying at UVMB!!
I have an offer and want to know more about the uni before finalizing my decision. I want to know your experiences... bad, good and neutral. I want to basically amalgamate information so please help me out.

*only actual students at the uni or alumni please leave info - I've seen a lot of people that have read other people's experiences online and keep parading it but I want it directly from the source please*

Obviously, if there's other students that are applying here and have questions, please leave them in this thread and hopefully we will all have our answers. I'd also love to connect with anyone (after ideally being accepted) who also ends up going because welp it's a new country and any familiarity is appreciated, I guess.

My two cents on the culture shock and political situation: I've travelled some amount to countries that are quite different to my own, though I haven't ever travelled to Hungary. I've read up as much as I can on the political situation and it seems iffy but anyway... I think each and every country has their pros and cons, some more disparate than others obviously. But it's a matter of making our peace with it. There's never gonna be a perfect country to go to when things are weighed. In fact, people would probably shoo you away from travelling to where I come from (let alone living and studying here for 5+ years) but I've lived a relatively peaceful life despite being a fairly targeted minority(yes, i understand privilege). I guess we need to do our best to take control of the situation and that's that. Don't mean to lecture, but I've seen a lot about this topic and just thought I'd give my opinion too.
Reply 1
Hey do you decide to enter the vet uni Budapest? I'm also considering b/t Budapest / other in Europe like Polane or others
Original post by Hi.Eri
Hey do you decide to enter the vet uni Budapest? I'm also considering b/t Budapest / other in Europe like Polane or others

Hey!
Yeah I'm set on budapest. I checked out the other universities and countries but so far I'm just more familiar with Budapest. I talked directly to a few students from there and managed to get some insight. Can always transfer if need be.
What about you? Have you already applied or are you yet to do so?
Reply 3
Original post by purgatory1732
Hey!
Yeah I'm set on budapest. I checked out the other universities and countries but so far I'm just more familiar with Budapest. I talked directly to a few students from there and managed to get some insight. Can always transfer if need be.
What about you? Have you already applied or are you yet to do so?

I already got an acceptance in January, and am applying for the scholarship as well. So many comments are all over :frown:, so I don't know how's situations there. Is it true almost 200 freshmen entered in the first year and 10% could survive?
Original post by Hi.Eri
I already got an acceptance in January, and am applying for the scholarship as well. So many comments are all over :frown:, so I don't know how's situations there. Is it true almost 200 freshmen entered in the first year and 10% could survive?

That's great! Congrats on the acceptance.
So I talked to a few people and it's definitely true that a lot of people drop out but I don't think that its as high as a 90% drop out rate. There's also the fact that it's an extremely difficult course and that too in Central Europe (known for being pretty demanding in terms of studies) so I suppose that should be taken into consideration. Also, I think the number of places are only 120 for the English course in first year so I don't think there's 200 freshmen to begin with.
There are definitely bad reviews about the place, I won't deny it. But I have a feeling that students who had bad experiences are more likely to post about it on forums or sites (not that that discredit their experience) cause they would want to prevent other students from suffering through similar things. The ones who are content with it or think it was a decent place won't really find the need to talk about it so there wouldn't be as much of those kinds of reviews. That's why I wanted direct experiences. I messaged a few people that are in various years at the university ( they were real people and not like idk, the uni catfishing or something) and they gave me both pros and cons. Every uni has both. I think personally that the place is worth it. Apparently there's a disconnect and some lack of communication between students and staff but nothing too bad. Plus there's student representatives and other forms of support to help you get through it. Sorry about the long reply
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 5
Original post by purgatory1732
That's great! Congrats on the acceptance.
So I talked to a few people and it's definitely true that a lot of people drop out but I don't think that its as high as a 90% drop out rate. There's also the fact that it's an extremely difficult course and that too in Central Europe (known for being pretty demanding in terms of studies) so I suppose that should be taken into consideration. Also, I think the number of places are only 120 for the English course in first year so I don't think there's 200 freshmen to begin with.
There are definitely bad reviews about the place, I won't deny it. But I have a feeling that students who had bad experiences are more likely to post about it on forums or sites (not that that discredit their experience) cause they would want to prevent other students from suffering through similar things. The ones who are content with it or think it was a decent place won't really find the need to talk about it so there wouldn't be as much of those kinds of reviews. That's why I wanted direct experiences. I messaged a few people that are in various years at the university ( they were real people and not like idk, the uni catfishing or something) and they gave me both pros and cons. Every uni has both. I think personally that the place is worth it. Apparently there's a disconnect and some lack of communication between students and staff but nothing too bad. Plus there's student representatives and other forms of support to help you get through it. Sorry about the long reply

Thank you so much! I appreciate your kindness :smile: I am waiting for the scholarship exam from Budapest. And I know some students from there, (I'm no-EU, international student) and they said very hopeless future after graduation as a non-EU student .. :frown: but I think it really depends. Because some students from non-EU could get jobs in English-speaking countries like UK or Ireland. I think this really depends on how each student spends uni-years right? Do you have any idea about this? like non-EU students' job hunting after graduation. Thank you so much :smile:
Original post by Hi.Eri
Thank you so much! I appreciate your kindness :smile: I am waiting for the scholarship exam from Budapest. And I know some students from there, (I'm no-EU, international student) and they said very hopeless future after graduation as a non-EU student .. :frown: but I think it really depends. Because some students from non-EU could get jobs in English-speaking countries like UK or Ireland. I think this really depends on how each student spends uni-years right? Do you have any idea about this? like non-EU students' job hunting after graduation. Thank you so much :smile:

I'm also an international student and I'm from somewhere that's super different to hungarian culture. What I've been told is that they are very extensive when it comes to theoretical knowledge. Practical knowledge is definitely there as well (lab and clinical work) cause otherwise they wouldn't be approved by the required associations and accredited. I think someone told me that it was a bit crowded when it came to the clinic and lab sessions but maybe that's better now cause of covid and also it's been a few years. But also it's up to the students to obtain as much practical work ourselves in our own time (holidays, breaks etc. That applies for vet school in any region cause UK has extra-mural-studies where students have to find and organize their own work experience during vet school. You can also get this work experience in your own country during holidays as long as your working with a professional vet. Basically we need to add it to our CV when applying to jobs and show them we know how to do surgeries and diagnose patients well.) because as long as you can show that you've graduated with the needed degree and have a good amount of practical experience, there's absolutely no issue with getting a job since there's a high demand for vets all round. As for the quality of job, if you can prove fluency in English then it shouldn't be too hard to get a job in UK/US/Canada (especially in Canada, there appears to be a recent shortage of vets). There's a lot of scope in the field to work your way up so if you have the prerequisites mentioned above, you won't be unemployed. In fact, I had the exact same concern but I checked out the job offers page on the uni website and there were plenty clinics from UK and Ireland that had uploaded job postings which I assume means that they won't discriminate against the fact that you have a degree from central Europe instead of a more mainstream region. There's too much demand for them to be overly picky
Reply 7
Original post by purgatory1732
I'm also an international student and I'm from somewhere that's super different to hungarian culture. What I've been told is that they are very extensive when it comes to theoretical knowledge. Practical knowledge is definitely there as well (lab and clinical work) cause otherwise they wouldn't be approved by the required associations and accredited. I think someone told me that it was a bit crowded when it came to the clinic and lab sessions but maybe that's better now cause of covid and also it's been a few years. But also it's up to the students to obtain as much practical work ourselves in our own time (holidays, breaks etc. That applies for vet school in any region cause UK has extra-mural-studies where students have to find and organize their own work experience during vet school. You can also get this work experience in your own country during holidays as long as your working with a professional vet. Basically we need to add it to our CV when applying to jobs and show them we know how to do surgeries and diagnose patients well.) because as long as you can show that you've graduated with the needed degree and have a good amount of practical experience, there's absolutely no issue with getting a job since there's a high demand for vets all round. As for the quality of job, if you can prove fluency in English then it shouldn't be too hard to get a job in UK/US/Canada (especially in Canada, there appears to be a recent shortage of vets). There's a lot of scope in the field to work your way up so if you have the prerequisites mentioned above, you won't be unemployed. In fact, I had the exact same concern but I checked out the job offers page on the uni website and there were plenty clinics from UK and Ireland that had uploaded job postings which I assume means that they won't discriminate against the fact that you have a degree from central Europe instead of a more mainstream region. There's too much demand for them to be overly picky

Hey, your comment totally cleared my curiosities:smile: Thank you so much. Have you dropped off or haven't had any problem going up to the next grades? Hopefully you haven't had :smile: I heard in this year almost 50% of students dropped off from Anatomy ... Such an unbelievable issue.
Original post by Hi.Eri
Hey, your comment totally cleared my curiosities:smile: Thank you so much. Have you dropped off or haven't had any problem going up to the next grades? Hopefully you haven't had :smile: I heard in this year almost 50% of students dropped off from Anatomy ... Such an unbelievable issue.

Oh I'm not in university yet. I got the acceptance and I'll be entering first year in September this year. I don't have any first hand experience with the uni, which is why I was talking to current students and why i posted this on the forum. But regarding anatomy... I mean. Anatomy is pretty universal throughout the world so whatever would be taught here is the same thing they would teach in other unis approximately. They told me during the interview that first year would be straight out of hell. I think the drop out rate is partially because of what a difficult course it is but also to ensure that only the students who can persevere through the 5 years will stay - which is partly for the sake of the university but also it helps the students realize they should change courses before they waste too many years. The latter... I personally know a lot of people who think vet med is easy (you know, the whole "playing with puppies all day) but it's literally a medicine course and you start doing surgeries right out of uni so there's that added part of it. Other than that, you have to be constantly staying on top of science even once you graduate since it's still a relatively new field that has frequent new discoveries. I'm not saying that they aren't motivated or suited to it. I think it's that its a seriously demanding course and the difficulty makes sure that a relatively fewer number of vets that come out of the program at the end will be overwhelmed by what the profession demands since they would experience it during the 5+ years in uni.

Edit: forgot to add one thing. It's well known that they admit a lot of people and that getting in is quite a bit easier than for a UK or US university (in terms of grades. These guys don't even have work experience requirements) so comparatively high drop out rates are very very understandable
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 9
Original post by purgatory1732
Oh I'm not in university yet. I got the acceptance and I'll be entering first year in September this year. I don't have any first hand experience with the uni, which is why I was talking to current students and why i posted this on the forum. But regarding anatomy... I mean. Anatomy is pretty universal throughout the world so whatever would be taught here is the same thing they would teach in other unis approximately. They told me during the interview that first year would be straight out of hell. I think the drop out rate is partially because of what a difficult course it is but also to ensure that only the students who can persevere through the 5 years will stay - which is partly for the sake of the university but also it helps the students realize they should change courses before they waste too many years. The latter... I personally know a lot of people who think vet med is easy (you know, the whole "playing with puppies all day) but it's literally a medicine course and you start doing surgeries right out of uni so there's that added part of it. Other than that, you have to be constantly staying on top of science even once you graduate since it's still a relatively new field that has frequent new discoveries. I'm not saying that they aren't motivated or suited to it. I think it's that its a seriously demanding course and the difficulty makes sure that a relatively fewer number of vets that come out of the program at the end will be overwhelmed by what the profession demands since they would experience it during the 5+ years in uni.

Edit: forgot to add one thing. It's well known that they admit a lot of people and that getting in is quite a bit easier than for a UK or US university (in terms of grades. These guys don't even have work experience requirements) so comparatively high drop out rates are very very understandable


Hey, did you take the entrance exam on 29 Jan? I took it on the day and as I know that was one of the earliest ones. If yes then we could see each other through the cam :smile: And yes, I agree with the points, like this uni accepts so many students so that it's natural to increase the total dropping out rate. I guess this unit drags money from the mass freshmen and drops them out for the next level, and let only survivors can continue next levels, so I guess probably the total final number of vets from Budapest could be similar to those from other unis. Anyway, the uni is registered in EAEVE so this means they have a qualified level of education in Veterinary Medicine. I believe so.
Original post by Hi.Eri
Hey, did you take the entrance exam on 29 Jan? I took it on the day and as I know that was one of the earliest ones. If yes then we could see each other through the cam :smile: And yes, I agree with the points, like this uni accepts so many students so that it's natural to increase the total dropping out rate. I guess this unit drags money from the mass freshmen and drops them out for the next level, and let only survivors can continue next levels, so I guess probably the total final number of vets from Budapest could be similar to those from other unis. Anyway, the uni is registered in EAEVE so this means they have a qualified level of education in Veterinary Medicine. I believe so.

I took it just last week so unfortunately I don't think we've met. How many other people were taking the exam with you? I had just 2 others.
And yes, most universities similar to Budapest only take about 60-80 students I believe but these guys take almost double. It is unfortunate that they do this for the sake of money but hopefully that doesn't mean that the quality of clinical education is squandered. Yeah they have the European accreditation and we can also work in UK without needing to write the RCVS examination since they recognize the college. The rule that allows us to do so is temporary currently but I think they're planning on extending it and making it permanent since there's a shortage of vets. When it comes to Warsaw (I was also considering it as I know an aquaintance who went there) ... I was doing some research and there was a notice on their website from the EAEVE in 2020 that said they didn't have enough equine clinical cases.
Screenshot_20220222-145144.jpg
As for Budapest, I found these evaluation reports on the website that are pretty insightful regarding both the advantages and the deficiencies. Take a look at the "final decision" document if you don't feel like going through everything. Also, note that these reports are from before 2016 (when the uni separated itself from Szent István and became it's own entity) so whatever they say about autonomy can be mostly discredited now I think.
https://univet.hu/en/about/eaeve-accreditation/

The report mentions that the chemistry part of the first year syllabus is very challenging for international students since they aren't used to the Hungarian system of teaching - and that's what owes to the high drop out rate, especially among internationals.
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by purgatory1732
I took it just last week so unfortunately I don't think we've met. How many other people were taking the exam with you? I had just 2 others.
And yes, most universities similar to Budapest only take about 60-80 students I believe but these guys take almost double. It is unfortunate that they do this for the sake of money but hopefully that doesn't mean that the quality of clinical education is squandered. Yeah they have the European accreditation and we can also work in UK without needing to write the RCVS examination since they recognize the college. The rule that allows us to do so is temporary currently but I think they're planning on extending it and making it permanent since there's a shortage of vets. When it comes to Warsaw (I was also considering it as I know an aquaintance who went there) ... I was doing some research and there was a notice on their website from the EAEVE in 2020 that said they didn't have enough equine clinical cases.
Screenshot_20220222-145144.jpg
As for Budapest, I found these evaluation reports on the website that are pretty insightful regarding both the advantages and the deficiencies. Take a look at the "final decision" document if you don't feel like going through everything. Also, note that these reports are from before 2016 (when the uni separated itself from Szent István and became it's own entity) so whatever they say about autonomy can be mostly discredited now I think.
https://univet.hu/en/about/eaeve-accreditation/

The report mentions that the chemistry part of the first year syllabus is very challenging for international students since they aren't used to the Hungarian system of teaching - and that's what owes to the high drop out rate, especially among internationals.


I'm thinking of applying aswell, from Ireland. I have mostly heard negative views from people aswell but I agree it may just be the people who have had bad experiences posting online on forums rather than the people who have had good experiences. I think I am year below you as I am applying for September 2023, if you got in could you let me know what it is like? It would help alot :smile: thanks!
There is someone working at vets in newry who graduated recently from Budapest. I'm sure she would chat to you. You could send the practice an email.
Hey! I got the scholarship to study at UVMB starting this year. I am also as wary about the negative reviews on the school but I'll be going anyway. Your point about Hungary's questionable politics and the warnings people would also give about where you come from really resonated with me. I'm currently trying to figure out what to bring to Hungary and renting an apartment (since UVMB doesn't provide dorms for us international students..) so do send me a PM if you want to chat! I just created this account so I can't do it myself ahaha.

Hope to see you in Budapest!
Hello!

Please can you explain more about the scholarship…
I didn't graduate from budapest but I have met vets that have and I personally haven't heard good things (from these vets). I agree with the high drop out rates, specific numbers uncertain. But the vet I met that qualified from there had massive confidence knocks and I am not sure whether the training was on par with the other UK universities re day one competencies. This is my personal opinion having worked with vets that trained there. Others may have had better experiences and be better informed, if they have accreditation they have met basic requirements and while you will qualify as a vet you also need to check they remain accepted by RCVS : https://www.rcvs.org.uk/registration/applications-veterinary-surgeons/europe/. This appears to run out this month this year (2023) so reaccreditation may be underway. If not you would have to sit the RCVS exam to be able to practice veterinary medicine in the UK.
Im a second-year student in Budapest univet.

Im top 30 (out of 200) in my class and I never failed a final here.

my point is, if you love your life DONT COME HERE.

this uni is truly the worst nightmare.
Original post by humpalumpa2813
Im a second-year student in Budapest univet.

Im top 30 (out of 200) in my class and I never failed a final here.

my point is, if you love your life DONT COME HERE.

this uni is truly the worst nightmare.


Can you be more specific ? Is the course tough or the living conditions ? Please do mention in detail.
Reply 18
Original post by humpalumpa2813
Im a second-year student in Budapest univet.

Im top 30 (out of 200) in my class and I never failed a final here.

my point is, if you love your life DONT COME HERE.

this uni is truly the worst nightmare.

can you explain why

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