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non-'useless' degrees i can do from essay based subjects at a level?

im currently doing english sociogy and politics. I orignaly wanted to do law but it seems to competitve and appparently being a lawyer itself is miserable. Lawvwas the only high regarded well paying dgeree i can think off. I dont do math/science nor did i do well in those subjects at gcse so i have no idea what other degrees i can do on the essay/humantities side that will actually be usuelful and land me a good paying job. Does anyone know any?
Reply 1
One of the best degrees that my girlfriends is studying is PPE, Politics, philosophy and Economics, it is a very desirable degree for employers and is rapidly becoming a very popular degree. Top schools like Uni of Oxford LSE etc. offer it although you may need to do research as some request certain subjects.
Reply 2
Original post by HARR1
One of the best degrees that my girlfriends is studying is PPE, Politics, philosophy and Economics, it is a very desirable degree for employers and is rapidly becoming a very popular degree. Top schools like Uni of Oxford LSE etc. offer it although you may need to do research as some request certain subjects.

'Rapidly becoming'?! It has been the degree de jure of our ruling class for at least 60 years!
(edited 7 months ago)
i met a person who enjoys his career in law

an option could be to start a law degree, enter a law internship or career, and see if it's for you
Original post by TTAva2000
im currently doing english sociogy and politics. I orignaly wanted to do law but it seems to competitve and appparently being a lawyer itself is miserable. Lawvwas the only high regarded well paying dgeree i can think off. I dont do math/science nor did i do well in those subjects at gcse so i have no idea what other degrees i can do on the essay/humantities side that will actually be usuelful and land me a good paying job. Does anyone know any?

I'd note you don't need to do a degree in law to become a solicitor in any event.

Note that time and again research has shown that long term employment outcomes for STEM and non-STEM graduates are equivalent, statistically.

Your degree subject is effectively a non-factor when it comes to applying to generalist grad schemes that have no specific required degree course. I know it's very popular for 6th form students to circle jerk over "this degree subject is better than that" but the reality is employers don't give a toss. They see you have a degree a 2:1 or above, tick that box on the recruitment process, and move on to assessing the rest of your CV.

Just do whatever you have a genuine intellectual interest in, so at least then when you get a job staring at spreadsheets for 8 hours a day like everyone else (whether they studied English lit, economics, physics, theoretical quantum biology, or underwater basket weaving) you can have some good memories of life before the endless toil of employment.

Original post by HARR1
One of the best degrees that my girlfriends is studying is PPE, Politics, philosophy and Economics, it is a very desirable degree for employers and is rapidly becoming a very popular degree. Top schools like Uni of Oxford LSE etc. offer it although you may need to do research as some request certain subjects.

PPE normally requires maths, which the OP doesn't have.
Reply 5
Original post by artful_lounger
I'd note you don't need to do a degree in law to become a solicitor in any event.

Note that time and again research has shown that long term employment outcomes for STEM and non-STEM graduates are equivalent, statistically.

Your degree subject is effectively a non-factor when it comes to applying to generalist grad schemes that have no specific required degree course. I know it's very popular for 6th form students to circle jerk over "this degree subject is better than that" but the reality is employers don't give a toss. They see you have a degree a 2:1 or above, tick that box on the recruitment process, and move on to assessing the rest of your CV.

Just do whatever you have a genuine intellectual interest in, so at least then when you get a job staring at spreadsheets for 8 hours a day like everyone else (whether they studied English lit, economics, physics, theoretical quantum biology, or underwater basket weaving) you can have some good memories of life before the endless toil of employment.


PPE normally requires maths, which the OP doesn't have.


Just to clarify for ppe- some courses like UCL and LSE require maths, Oxford do in reality although people do point to exceptions.

There are plenty of great PPE courses with no requirement for maths A level (although there does seem to be a trend for requiring maths - Durham for example.) Warwick and York would be good options which don’t require maths a level.
Reply 6
Original post by artful_lounger
I'd note you don't need to do a degree in law to become a solicitor in any event.

Note that time and again research has shown that long term employment outcomes for STEM and non-STEM graduates are equivalent, statistically.

Your degree subject is effectively a non-factor when it comes to applying to generalist grad schemes that have no specific required degree course. I know it's very popular for 6th form students to circle jerk over "this degree subject is better than that" but the reality is employers don't give a toss. They see you have a degree a 2:1 or above, tick that box on the recruitment process, and move on to assessing the rest of your CV.

Just do whatever you have a genuine intellectual interest in, so at least then when you get a job staring at spreadsheets for 8 hours a day like everyone else (whether they studied English lit, economics, physics, theoretical quantum biology, or underwater basket weaving) you can have some good memories of life before the endless toil of employment.


PPE normally requires maths, which the OP doesn't have.

Could not agree more. The vast majority of Grad scheme do not require specific subjects, and most people end up in careers that are not related to their degree. Students should pick the degree subject that they are most interested in.
Reply 7
Original post by TTAva2000
im currently doing english sociogy and politics. I orignaly wanted to do law but it seems to competitve and appparently being a lawyer itself is miserable. Lawvwas the only high regarded well paying dgeree i can think off. I dont do math/science nor did i do well in those subjects at gcse so i have no idea what other degrees i can do on the essay/humantities side that will actually be usuelful and land me a good paying job. Does anyone know any?


You are looking at this all wrong. What do you want when you leave university? To be a lawyer or to earn lots of money? I don't know if you know this, but lawyers are one of the worst paid professions, assuming you can pass the bar to entry. Yes, there is lots of money for the top lawyers but only the top.

If you want to earn lots of money, don't waste any time going to university. Set up your own business and start trading. Now is the time to do it. But seriously, don't go into a profession because it earns so much money. It will bring only misery and disappointment.
Original post by artful_lounger
I'd note you don't need to do a degree in law to become a solicitor in any event.

Note that time and again research has shown that long term employment outcomes for STEM and non-STEM graduates are equivalent, statistically.

Your degree subject is effectively a non-factor when it comes to applying to generalist grad schemes that have no specific required degree course. I know it's very popular for 6th form students to circle jerk over "this degree subject is better than that" but the reality is employers don't give a toss. They see you have a degree a 2:1 or above, tick that box on the recruitment process, and move on to assessing the rest of your CV.

Just do whatever you have a genuine intellectual interest in, so at least then when you get a job staring at spreadsheets for 8 hours a day like everyone else (whether they studied English lit, economics, physics, theoretical quantum biology, or underwater basket weaving) you can have some good memories of life before the endless toil of employment.


PPE normally requires maths, which the OP doesn't have.

You do not need a degree to become a lawyer there is the employment route. Somebody can leave school at sixteen and do the training route with a couple of low grade GCSEs.
Original post by TTAva2000
im currently doing english sociogy and politics. I orignaly wanted to do law but it seems to competitve and appparently being a lawyer itself is miserable. Lawvwas the only high regarded well paying dgeree i can think off. I dont do math/science nor did i do well in those subjects at gcse so i have no idea what other degrees i can do on the essay/humantities side that will actually be usuelful and land me a good paying job. Does anyone know any?


You can make money in any industry if you create the right opportunity
Reply 10
Original post by artful_lounger
I'd note you don't need to do a degree in law to become a solicitor in any event.

Note that time and again research has shown that long term employment outcomes for STEM and non-STEM graduates are equivalent, statistically.

Your degree subject is effectively a non-factor when it comes to applying to generalist grad schemes that have no specific required degree course. I know it's very popular for 6th form students to circle jerk over "this degree subject is better than that" but the reality is employers don't give a toss. They see you have a degree a 2:1 or above, tick that box on the recruitment process, and move on to assessing the rest of your CV.

Just do whatever you have a genuine intellectual interest in, so at least then when you get a job staring at spreadsheets for 8 hours a day like everyone else (whether they studied English lit, economics, physics, theoretical quantum biology, or underwater basket weaving) you can have some good memories of life before the endless toil of employment.


PPE normally requires maths, which the OP doesn't have.


I’m debating retaking maths so I can take the subject to be honest
Reply 11
Darn that was harsh. I’m doing law or I might simply because it’s the best paying job I’ve seen that isn’t stem. I’m planning on doing business on the side during uni and if I’m successful I drop out. I never wanted to get a degree a job and become a money slave this is my backup but I’m not rich right now so there’s not much I can do


false

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