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Does this mean that the grade boundaries will be much higher? I don’t understand
Original post by B7861
Does this mean that the grade boundaries will be much higher? I don’t understand

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ofqual-student-guide-2023/ofqual-student-guide-2023#what-happens-after-you-have-taken-your-exams-or-assessments Is clearer than sky news

Yes but does this mean grade boundaries are going to be higher or lower because there hasn’t been any talk of this
Reply 5
“Could”

Want’s the point of this article? Just wait a few weeks and find out what actually happened.
(edited 9 months ago)
And that was from just one TSR user they polled. Imagine how many more are A/A* grades out there are missing!
what do you mean?
Original post by artful_lounger
And that was from just one TSR user they polled. Imagine how many more are A/A* grades out there are missing!
if papers were easier, higher. if papers were harder, lower. simple as that
Original post by B7861
Yes but does this mean grade boundaries are going to be higher or lower because there hasn’t been any talk of this
Reply 9
Original post by Notnek
“Could”

Want’s the point in this article? Just wait a few weeks and find out what actually happened.


Not only that but percentage wise the article suggests more people will get As and A*s than the 2019 so even then its not exactly a fall.
Original post by gshsghksjhajk
if papers were easier, higher. if papers were harder, lower. simple as that

No s**t Sherlock
Original post by B7861
Yes but does this mean grade boundaries are going to be higher or lower because there hasn’t been any talk of this

higher than they would have been had the papers been sat last year with the same mark distribution. how much higher depends on how much higher the grades were during COVID. (e.g. for FM the proportion of A*s doubled from like 23 to 48)

questions of "higher or lower" are weird because on top of this, the difficulty of the paper changes
(edited 9 months ago)
Around 750,000 a level exams are sat each year

In 2022 36.4% were awarded a/a* (or 270,000)

1282B7D8-1AE6-45CF-AE8F-0B05DA53A4B5.jpeg

If there are 100,00 less this year (with the same number of exams) then 22.6% of exams will result in an a or a* being awarded

The percentage for 2019 was 25.5%

So, while we will have to wait for the results to be released, it looks like the article just says that IF they keep their promise to reset grade boundaries to 2019 or before (I.e. mark required for each grade will be adjusted to have this percentage of people awarded) then that will result in 100,000 less a/a* awards.

The “expert” in the sky article supplies incorrect values but the point is it’s a lot fewer a/a* grades IF they keep to plan. The BBC article basically says the same thing (percentages returned to prepandemic / 2019 levels and so you can have the same expectation of an A as you did in 2019)

Not sure that this is news really (as they announced the plan months ago)
(edited 9 months ago)
Original post by gshsghksjhajk
what do you mean?

It was a joke about how the average TSR user seems to always have 100,000 A*s since birth and is planning to study theoretical rocket surgery at Camford University :tongue:
I think Ur maths is wrong, 750,000 people take A levels. most people do 3 subjects so it would be 750,000x3= around 2.25 million a levels. This seems too high tho so I might be wrong
Original post by Johnny Valentine
Around 750,000 a level exams are sat each year

In 2022 36.4% were awarded a/a* (or 270,000)

1282B7D8-1AE6-45CF-AE8F-0B05DA53A4B5.jpeg

If there are 100,00 less this year (with the same number of exams) then 22.6% of exams will result in an a or a* being awarded

The percentage for 2019 was 25.5%

So, while we will have to wait for the results to be released, it looks like the article just says that IF they keep their promise to reset grade boundaries to 2019 or before (I.e. mark required for each grade will be adjusted to have this percentage of people awarded) then that will result in 100,000 less a/a* awards.

The “expert” in the sky article supplies incorrect values but the point is it’s a lot fewer a/a* grades IF they keep to plan. The BBC article basically says the same thing (percentages returned to prepandemic / 2019 levels and so you can have the same expectation of an A as you did in 2019)

Not sure that this is news really (as they announced the plan months ago)
Original post by B7861
No s**t Sherlock

then why are u even asking that question...
Original post by gshsghksjhajk
I think Ur maths is wrong, 750,000 people take A levels. most people do 3 subjects so it would be 750,000x3= around 2.25 million a levels. This seems too high tho so I might be wrong


Yeah, it’s only 250,000 people taking a levels for a total of 750,000 exams

Official government stats for 2019 at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/825429/A-Level-infographic_current___3_.pdf
(edited 9 months ago)
Teachers and markers love dishing them out now, grades will stay high forever.
what do you mean? how would they stay high forever?
Original post by random_matt
Teachers and markers love dishing them out now, grades will stay high forever.
Reply 19
Original post by gshsghksjhajk
what do you mean? how would they stay high forever?


They won't. But the whole A/A* thing is a farce. Just exactly how does it help anyone if 25-30% of students get the top marks? It doesn't help universities or employers because how do you pick the best candidates? It doesn't help the candidates because they are all competing for the top spots with nothing to distinguish the best from the bunch and it also doesn't help students because they think they are an A student when in reality they know not very much and are in for a massive shock when the real world presents itself.

The only people they do help are the government fed by schools and colleges who love smoke being blown up their backside to say how good they are getting A and A* students out of the door.

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