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Computing at imperial offer rate for 4 vs 3 year course

Consistently each year the 4 year course for computing has about half as many applicants while about 10% more offers than the 3 year computing course. Only difference between them is the 4th year. Does this mean you literally have a much better chance if you apply for the 4 year course, or is there some sort of pooling system which results in these figures maybe?
I would not read anything into that, you can move very easily between these two courses if your marks are good enough and they share most units in the 1st 2.5 years so are basically recruiting the same people. Any apparent difference are just statistical noise.
(edited 4 months ago)
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Reply 2
Original post by Mr Wednesday
I would not read anything into that, you can move very easily between these two courses if your marks are good enough and they share most units in the 1st 2.5 years so are basically recruiting the same people. Any apparent difference are just statistical noise.


Do you know why the amount of places offered is a bit more despite half the applicants for the 4 year course cos it happens consistently each year from what I've looked at. It's too late for me now anyway cos I already applied for the 3 year course but I'm just paranoid rn.
Original post by DrWhoZombie
Do you know why the amount of places offered is a bit more despite half the applicants for the 4 year course cos it happens consistently each year from what I've looked at. It's too late for me now anyway cos I already applied for the 3 year course but I'm just paranoid rn.

Likely a function of some fraction of the better / more ambitious candidates going directly for the 4 year masters level course to begin with. If this was a vehicle for trying to game the system it would have been recognised already, not least by the admisions team.
Reply 4
Original post by DrWhoZombie
Consistently each year the 4 year course for computing has about half as many applicants while about 10% more offers than the 3 year computing course. Only difference between them is the 4th year. Does this mean you literally have a much better chance if you apply for the 4 year course, or is there some sort of pooling system which results in these figures maybe?


Little bit late, but during my interview they told us it didn’t matter which of the options u picked, only if you did a joint maths course would it matter
Reply 5
Original post by alsabtya64
Little bit late, but during my interview they told us it didn’t matter which of the options u picked, only if you did a joint maths course would it matter

Are you sure it matters for joint maths courses, because at the Imperial interviews last year they said that they review them as the same? Because I might do joint maths then.
Original post by Clevaboy

Are you sure it matters for joint maths courses, because at the Imperial interviews last year they said that they review them as the same? Because I might do joint maths then.


The three and four year courses are viewed as the same as they allow you to freely change between them for the first two years as it only changes in your third year what you do, same goes for all the computing options
Reply 7
Original post by alsabtya64
The three and four year courses are viewed as the same as they allow you to freely change between them for the first two years as it only changes in your third year what you do, same goes for all the computing options

Oh ok, that makes sense. Would there be any difference in my chances of getting an offer if I applied for Joint Mathematics and Computing or straight Computing?
Original post by Clevaboy

Oh ok, that makes sense. Would there be any difference in my chances of getting an offer if I applied for Joint Mathematics and Computing or straight Computing?


Yes there would be the applications are looked at separately. Your odds are roughly the same for both it’s just what are you as a candidate more suited for
Reply 9
A four-year master's degree is a good option if it's easier to get admitted, but what's the truth?

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