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How hard are A levels?

I am currently still in secondary school, and I want to become a GP. I was looking at past papers for biology, chemistry and maths at A level.

They look REALLY, REALLY hard!

I know I haven't learned any of the content for those exams yet, but how difficult is it to get A stars in those subjects? Does 6th form teach you all the content really well? Am I worrying about nothing, considering I shouldn't be able to answer those questions anyway? I don't know, but I'm quite panicked. I'm considered quite an academic student as well, I'm predicted an 8 in maths, a 7 in biology and a 7 in chemistry at GCSE.

Thanks
A-levels are harder than GCSEs but it doesn't really benefit you worrying about how much harder it is going to be - I would just focus on doing well in your GCSEs. It is very difficult to get A*s at A-level but if you put the work in, you will absolutely be able to achieve it.
Original post by flowersinmyhair
A-levels are harder than GCSEs but it doesn't really benefit you worrying about how much harder it is going to be - I would just focus on doing well in your GCSEs. It is very difficult to get A*s at A-level but if you put the work in, you will absolutely be able to achieve it.

Thanks for the honest, clear answer; I appreciate it!
Reply 3
It will seem overwhelming to you now, of course. Imo A-levels have been of equal difficulty to my GCSEs, granted I am smarter now and I revise (I didn't in secondary school) but the content is also harder. The content is not THAT much harder though, it's just a lot of content lol. Dw you'll be fine, everything will be gone through in great depth and you'll have a full 2 years to prepare which is certainly enough time. Take things one step at a time.
Note also you don't need to do maths to go into medicine. Only one medical school requires your third subject to be a STEM subject (physics or maths), and only two others specify what it has to be at all (which both just specify it be "academic" which encompasses most A-levels). The rest of them don't care what your third A-level subject is. You also don't even necessarily have to do both chemistry and biology (although it's suggested as it gives you the most possible options). Also you don't need to get A*s in all your subjects - some medical schools only require AAA for the standard offer, and none to my knowledge require A*A*A* anyway (I think the highest standard offer is A*A*A).

As above though just focus on doing well in your GCSEs, then ideally do biology and chemistry plus whatever third subject you want and aim to do well and undertake the relevant work experience and reflect on it and prepare well for the UCAT.
The difficulty is relative to your level of learning/understanding of the concept. They look difficult know but if you enjoy sciences/are good at them, the papers won’t be hard by the time you come to do them as a year 13.
From the subjects you asked for: mathematics.

The difficulty level cpmpared to GCSE is immense, however it is doable.
Everyone thanks so much for responding, you are all extremely helpful and kind; thanks!
Original post by School_Student99
I am currently still in secondary school, and I want to become a GP. I was looking at past papers for biology, chemistry and maths at A level.
They look REALLY, REALLY hard!
I know I haven't learned any of the content for those exams yet, but how difficult is it to get A stars in those subjects? Does 6th form teach you all the content really well? Am I worrying about nothing, considering I shouldn't be able to answer those questions anyway? I don't know, but I'm quite panicked. I'm considered quite an academic student as well, I'm predicted an 8 in maths, a 7 in biology and a 7 in chemistry at GCSE.
Thanks

Hi @School_Student99,

You can think of A-Levels as an extension of your GCSEs as lots of topics for subjects such as biology and chemistry are taught at surface level in GCSEs. In A-Levels these concepts and topics are explored in much greater detail hence why students argue A-Levels to be very difficult.

However, it is very possible to achieve high attainment in A-Levels with enough determination and hard work. Lots of independence will be required on your behalf, but it is achievable!

All the best,
Danish
BCU Student Rep
Original post by BCU Student Rep
Hi @School_Student99,
You can think of A-Levels as an extension of your GCSEs as lots of topics for subjects such as biology and chemistry are taught at surface level in GCSEs. In A-Levels these concepts and topics are explored in much greater detail hence why students argue A-Levels to be very difficult.
However, it is very possible to achieve high attainment in A-Levels with enough determination and hard work. Lots of independence will be required on your behalf, but it is achievable!
All the best,
Danish
BCU Student Rep

Thank you so much for your help!

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