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    (Original post by Montdale)
    Both UCLA and Berkeley are part of the University of California, which is a public university, and the State of California requires the University of California to offer a place to all California students who make a certain score on the SATs/ACT and/or have certain grades. Not everyone gets to go to Berkeley; most people end up with an offer from a lower ranked UC school. But the grades and test scores for out of state and international students are higher than for instate students since the UC system has to take a certain number of California students.

    I don't know how they factor in grades for UK students, but it is possible to be considered for admission (they would still look at your extra curricula activities and grades) by test scores alone. To give you an idea, there is a minimum formula which is on their website, http://admission.universityofcalifor...s/examination/

    If you qualify by that standard, you likely have a very good chance, since this calculation basically ignores your grades, and if you have A*s that can only help.
    Can you show me where it says this, please?

    the State of California requires the University of California to offer a place to all California students who make a certain score on the SATs/ACT and/or have certain grades.
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    http://admission.universityofcalifor...nia-residents/ and
    http://admission.universityofcalifor...nia-residents/

    You get in with either statewide or local path. They calculate the 9% using SAT/ACT scores and grades. There is a calculator at the second webpage that includes entry for grades and test scores.
    But this is only for California residents. If you are international, it's different.

    If you want the actual law or political deal that said the top 9% will be offered places you could search online. I think Governor Brown came to some kind of agreement last year or the year before with the Regents about making sure that more California students were being offered places.
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    (Original post by Montdale)
    http://admission.universityofcalifor...nia-residents/ and
    http://admission.universityofcalifor...nia-residents/

    You get in with either statewide or local path. They calculate the 9% using SAT/ACT scores and grades. There is a calculator at the second webpage that includes entry for grades and test scores.
    But this is only for California residents. If you are international, it's different.

    If you want the actual law or political deal that said the top 9% will be offered places you could search online. I think Governor Brown came to some kind of agreement last year or the year before with the Regents about making sure that more California students were being offered places.
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Montdale)
    If you want the actual law or political deal that said the top 9% will be offered places you could search online. I think Governor Brown came to some kind of agreement last year or the year before with the Regents about making sure that more California students were being offered places.
    It wasn't exactly well known information, but UCal has primarily accepted Cali residents for a long time. The most recent deal itself may be renewing the original agreement, or bumping up the number of acceptance spots. Part of the reason behind this was the State of California providing some sort of financial support to the UC and CSU systems. That led to a major hit in 2010, where there were educational cuts and CSU could only offer 3-4 days of teaching to students per week.
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    (Original post by zombiejon)
    It wasn't exactly well known information, but UCal has primarily accepted Cali residents for a long time. The most recent deal itself may be renewing the original agreement, or bumping up the number of acceptance spots. Part of the reason behind this was the State of California providing some sort of financial support to the UC and CSU systems. That led to a major hit in 2010, where there were educational cuts and CSU could only offer 3-4 days of teaching to students per week.
    That's true to a point. The 2010 crisis was just the latest in a long line of budget cuts and UC and CSU response, and the "offer only 3-4 days of teaching" is misleading. Most classes at UC and CSU are offered MWF or TT so the issue from the people I know was more whether they could actually get into a particular critical class, not how many days it was being taught.

    UC used to receive a significant percent of its budget from the State of California. I've read different amounts, but in 1980 it might have been as high as 87% for the core budget. Technically UC was tuition free (or nearly) then for California residents, and if you were in the top 12% of California high school graduates you were guaranteed a place somewhere in the UC system. California began to provide less and less of the budget and to make up for that UC raised fees and started charging tuition for instate students, but it also increased the number of out-of-state and foreign students, who have always paid tuition and pay significantly more in tuition than instate students. Now it's down to the top 9% of California residents being offered places and the cost of attending if you are instate is about ten times what it was in 1980.

    This last year the state insisted that UC increase the number of state residents that got places. But I don't know if or how that would affect an out of state student's chances given the financial benefit of accepting out of state students. It may be it will just be even more difficult for everyone to get the classes they need to graduate.
 
 
 
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