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    (Original post by georgia-hughes)
    I was in private education from the age of 4 until 16, only received extra time once I moved to an academy for sixth form. Barely anybody at my private school had extra time compared to where I am now. And I think you ought to educate yourself in the class system, you're getting confused with upper class and middle class.
    Sorry mate, I go to a private school myself and have been since age 4.I am 16, so i have as much experience, if not more, considering that i have been to three schools. I am middle class(or at least think I am). Around 30% of people in my year get extra time(or a computer).The only education that needs to go on here is of yourself, regarding how to write polite replies.Simply, your private school is not representative of most.
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    (Original post by OturuDansay)
    no I would not
    Good. People don't get extra time for being less intelligent. They get it for various reasons- I wrote an essay about it a few posts back! But some people misuse the system. Sadly that's life.


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    (Original post by Martins1)
    OK this just got unnecessarily rude. I go to a private school. We do not "abuse the system" - one person in my year has extra time, out of about 180. About three have supervised rest breaks. How exactly do we abuse the system? Everyone has to get diagnosed by doctors, and so do we - we do not abuse the system.

    This is totally unfair - how can you rid of it because of cheaters. You cannot say that everyone cheats- there are tens of thousands of children nation wide with genuine disabilities - it is totally unfair to scrap the system just because some people are cheating on it. What you should do is make it harder to cheat. Full stop.
    You ask how? it is very simple, Nicky Morgan writes a letter to OCR, AQA,EDEXCEL, and any other exam boards, telling them extra time no longer exists.
    In my school, which is one of 3 private ones I have been to, about 30% of people get extra time.Also, we were all assessed internally, and only checked by a member of staff, who, coincidentally, did not even have a masters, talkless of having a doctorate.

    Extra time is is unfair to those who miss out marginally, because had they been tested again, they might qualify.It is also unfair because it does not take account of real life, because in real life there is no such thing as extra time.
    BTW , your school must be massive, my year is the biggest in the school, and there are 100 of us.
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    I have heard of schools coaching pupils so that they get extra time and can give out 'emergency' extra time during the exam period with out having to go through any of the testing so long as they can kind of justify it. THAT is wrong.

    I am very dyslexic (50% AT) and struggle to read things and have to have rest breaks due to breaking my writing fingers twice meaning that they seize up if I write for too long. To prove that I had to go for x rays, have a doctors note and had several tests to get those rest breaks, including writing to the point where my hand seized up- which is quite painful.

    On the other hand, my best friend- who does have episodes of crippling anxiety- gets 25-35% extra time and rest breaks IN CASE she panics, which she more often than not doesn't. She is a very fast writer, has a high IQ and is generally really smart and I think that it is so unfair that she gets always gets extra time (which can be an additional 35 mins) to write when in most cases she has no need for it. The school gave it to her on her first exam with no testing required.

    It sounds very b****y as we are best friends, but at the moment it is a constant source of tension between us, though I imagine this happens elsewhere too. It means that the playing field within extra time is even more unequal than it already would be from lumping together thousands of students into 3 general categories for 25%/35%/50% extra time and means that really the extra time does not give the students- who generally need it- the full benefit.
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    (Original post by Martins1)
    Spot on! Very well written, and precisely what needs to be said! Although this also adds on to the reasons why exams themselves ought to be reformed!
    Thank you. I would also agree exams, and potentially the education system itself, needs to be reformed.

    My opinion is very controversial and likely to be bashed by many, but getting good grades does not necessarily make you intelligent. I'm not saying people who do well aren't intelligent because the majority are, as well as hardworking ect. But school now seems to be what you regurgitate rather than what you can build upon or add to what we know. It also doesn't really prepare you for real life and true independent thought and creation.
    There are a lot of people who fail school who are incredibly intelligent, but simply do not test well, have differing interests or specialist areas than the curriculum or have a different learning style to the mainstream. A better education system could feed those minds and better so many more young people in various areas and have a huge global benefit.

    I think the saying 'you can't judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree' is very relevant here. There needs to be more acceptance that everyone is good at different things and has the capability to improve the world via their contributions to them. You can't say someones talents are more valid than someone elses dependant on what field they're in. There needs to be more support for varying attributes and not just english/math/science. It think it is a shame BTEC has so much stigma because they can be very valuable to certain areas such as sport that are more practical.
    What I'm getting to is that there is a difference between equality and equity; it is the latter that will benefit society but our current education system doesn't really allow for that. Extra time is a movement in that direction...

    at the end of the day extra time allows people who struggle to express themselves as quickly as others to show that that they ARE intelligent and have useful knowledge, points, opinions and arguments which deserve to be valued and recognised as much as anyone else's in society. These people can make just as valuable contributions as any of us, they just need longer to express it. In the real world, when it comes down to the most important things in life, nobody cares if it takes you an hour or a day to come up with a point, they care who makes the better point.
    Yes people abuse the system and get extra time when they don't deserve it, but that means there is a fault with the means testing, not the principle itself... Stop being bitter toward your peers and be bitter toward the system.
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    (Original post by Martins1)
    Completely agreed - quite confused why they do get extra time - the problem is not his timing, but handwriting, so surely extra time is unnecessary - unless his typing speed is much slower than that of his writing speed, I guess.
    You have to undergo a test if you use a laptop to see how much time you really need. I, for example, type much faster than I write; so if I was to use a laptop, (I don't need to - my hands are fine) my time would be adjusted.

    Well, I think that if someone hasn't been disagnosed they should immediately get diagnosed - there is often a tonne of help and advice from professionals concerning this. It could very well be affecting her learning and this could be what means whe has to do foundation tier rather than higher tier. On the other hand, the professionals may also say that it isn't affecting her learning - either way, she ought to find out.
    It really isn't that simple.
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    This is an interesting question, i dont have any scientific condition, but in many exams (essay based or long-writing) my hand flares up and i get cramp, in my recent english language exam , I spent 40% off the time waggling my hands trying to get blood circulation, as Ive broken my index finger maybe 10 times (basketball ). As a test is meant to say how you understand a subject and how good you are at it and at conducting the exam I feel I deserved extra time, whereas over 30-35% of kids in my year get extra time there reason is usually, i rarely finish exams, that gets on my nerves. It just seems like a part of a test is to see how fast and how well you can answer something, taking a long time to process is a part of the challenge, that's like someone being excluded from algebraic maths questions cos they're not great at algebra, it defeats the point. I guess its tough to draw the line but even a friend of mine who got extra time walked out of the exam early cos he didnt agree with it.

    If you can answer all questions with someone dictating at normal pace in 1 hour and can do the same thing writing but in 15 mins extra then I think you should get extra time, but if you need the extra 15 mins to think then i dont think you should get extra time
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    (Original post by V ugvg jhi)
    You ask how? it is very simple, Nicky Morgan writes a letter to OCR, AQA,EDEXCEL, and any other exam boards, telling them extra time no longer exists.
    In my school, which is one of 3 private ones I have been to, about 30% of people get extra time.Also, we were all assessed internally, and only checked by a member of staff, who, coincidentally, did not even have a masters, talkless of having a doctorate.

    Extra time is is unfair to those who miss out marginally, because had they been tested again, they might qualify.It is also unfair because it does not take account of real life, because in real life there is no such thing as extra time.
    BTW , your school must be massive, my year is the biggest in the school, and there are 100 of us.
    Well yes, that sounds like cheating the system to me. At the same time, I'd be very surprised if they aren't getting any external diagnosis. Either way, just because people cheat, doesn't mean we can give up on people who NEED this help and extra time - it just means we need to fix the system - so that schools such as yours can not get away with that and so that everyone needs external diagnosis. Just to say, that although there is no "extra time" in life, there are also no exams. How many times have you EVER heard of an employer ask their employee to sit down without the aid of the internet and complete as much as they can in an hour? Never, assignments are typically given much more time and much more freedom to carry out how and when you like.
    In my school I referenced one person with extra time - he has extremely slow handwriting - I've seen it in exams and man do I feel sorry for him. The two people I know who have supervised rest breaks; well one has frequent panic attacks and the other has a rare heart condition. The latter is in my English set and before the English speaking and listening I witnessed him having a panic attack. It was truly terrifying and there was no way he could complete his speaking and listening - our teacher moved it back a week for him. As he became stressed he started putting his head in his hands, lashing out violently at anyone who tried to help and breathing heavily. That 100% deserves supervised rest breaks in order to stop that happening.
    (Original post by Panzamad)
    I have heard of schools coaching pupils so that they get extra time and can give out 'emergency' extra time during the exam period with out having to go through any of the testing so long as they can kind of justify it. THAT is wrong.

    I am very dyslexic (50% AT) and struggle to read things and have to have rest breaks due to breaking my writing fingers twice meaning that they seize up if I write for too long. To prove that I had to go for x rays, have a doctors note and had several tests to get those rest breaks, including writing to the point where my hand seized up- which is quite painful.

    On the other hand, my best friend- who does have episodes of crippling anxiety- gets 25-35% extra time and rest breaks IN CASE she panics, which she more often than not doesn't. She is a very fast writer, has a high IQ and is generally really smart and I think that it is so unfair that she gets always gets extra time (which can be an additional 35 mins) to write when in most cases she has no need for it. The school gave it to her on her first exam with no testing required.

    It sounds very b****y as we are best friends, but at the moment it is a constant source of tension between us, though I imagine this happens elsewhere too. It means that the playing field within extra time is even more unequal than it already would be from lumping together thousands of students into 3 general categories for 25%/35%/50% extra time and means that really the extra time does not give the students- who generally need it- the full benefit.
    I've never witnessed schools 'coaching' kids for extra time - but that is plain wrong. I'm not sure how anyone can fake the test that you had - surely it seizes up or it doesn't? On a more personal note I would drop the subject of extra time with your friend because it's not worth losing a friendship over extra time in exams - friendship is far more important than any grades
    (Original post by kisaki)
    Thank you. I would also agree exams, and potentially the education system itself, needs to be reformed.

    My opinion is very controversial and likely to be bashed by many, but getting good grades does not necessarily make you intelligent. I'm not saying people who do well aren't intelligent because the majority are, as well as hardworking ect. But school now seems to be what you regurgitate rather than what you can build upon or add to what we know. It also doesn't really prepare you for real life and true independent thought and creation.
    There are a lot of people who fail school who are incredibly intelligent, but simply do not test well, have differing interests or specialist areas than the curriculum or have a different learning style to the mainstream. A better education system could feed those minds and better so many more young people in various areas and have a huge global benefit.

    I think the saying 'you can't judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree' is very relevant here. There needs to be more acceptance that everyone is good at different things and has the capability to improve the world via their contributions to them. You can't say someones talents are more valid than someone elses dependant on what field they're in. There needs to be more support for varying attributes and not just english/math/science. It think it is a shame BTEC has so much stigma because they can be very valuable to certain areas such as sport that are more practical.
    What I'm getting to is that there is a difference between equality and equity; it is the latter that will benefit society but our current education system doesn't really allow for that. Extra time is a movement in that direction...

    at the end of the day extra time allows people who struggle to express themselves as quickly as others to show that that they ARE intelligent and have useful knowledge, points, opinions and arguments which deserve to be valued and recognised as much as anyone else's in society. These people can make just as valuable contributions as any of us, they just need longer to express it. In the real world, when it comes down to the most important things in life, nobody cares if it takes you an hour or a day to come up with a point, they care who makes the better point.
    Yes people abuse the system and get extra time when they don't deserve it, but that means there is a fault with the means testing, not the principle itself... Stop being bitter toward your peers and be bitter toward the system.
    YES YES YES and YES! So very true - the fact is exams do not equal intelligence and sadly school life is now solely focused on getting grades when it should be about expanding your horizons, forming your own opinions on world views and the important questions in life, getting morals (which would stop people cheating on tests out of moral conscience) and most importantly forming interests - so that people know where they want to go and feel impassioned by what they do so that they can have an enjoyable life. BTEC's stigma is another thing which needs to be fixed - this is why I created the thread about educational reform, so please do comment on there as I guess we are sidetracking a lot...
    Sadly people believe only in equality nowadays - the fact is equality is not fair - equality in OPPORTUNITY is what is fair and we should be moving towards that, rather than just out and out equality.
    I would even say try not to be bitter towards the system - just try to help reform the system nicely, its more likely to get done then - and you are completely right - just because a system is flawed, doesn't mean you give up on it and scrap it - no you work and improve it!
    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    You have to undergo a test if you use a laptop to see how much time you really need. I, for example, type much faster than I write; so if I was to use a laptop, (I don't need to - my hands are fine) my time would be adjusted.

    It really isn't that simple.
    Either way, its a good idea to get diagnosed to see what the genuine situation is rather than wondering around blindly in the dark.
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    personally i am dyslexic and have processing issues and find that an extra 25% of time gives me that extra boost. sometimes just that extra 20 minutes can give me an extra couple of marks. But id rather not have dyslexia or processing problems and and not have extra times. BUt i don't think the education system is fair as in an extra 20 mins how am i meant to know a spelling that i didn't know when i went into the exam.
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    No I think it is unfair as it is not always measured correctly based on the persons needs. Extra time should be allocated based on the severity of the disability and not generalised for everyone who requires extra time.
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    (Original post by Martins1)
    How is this a dumbing down of exams? It's the exact same material, so its not being dumbed down, although giving everyone adequate time would make it easier - NOT dumbed down. And the reason we have a time limit is because otherwise in English, RS, History and Classics literature people would write an absolute tonne - which would be impossible to mark. All that is happening with extra time is that people are recieving what is essentially the same aount of time in proportion to their writing speed. Person A is no less intelligent than Person B because they broke their hand and so have a slower writing speed... The same is true of those who just naturally have slow writing speed. That's why science/maths exams are very rarely ever time pressured - because they are testing ability and knowledge, and people won't write tonnes even with extra time. In time pressured exams, it's only there for practical reasons.
    But they wouldn't because although in actual time they get more, due to their disabilities, their time in proportion to their writing speed is therefore the same as yours is - and often its actually less. Imagine if you started an exam and literally after reading the five word question in a few seconds, continously write at full speed, getting everything correct. However, despite knowing exactly what more you needed to write down, you PYSICALLY could not complete the exam on account of your writing speed. Imagine how frustrating that would be and how frustrated you would be, having revised and worked hard for the exam, and knowing that you KNEW all the asnwers but your writing speed let you down. Exams should not be a test of writing speed, but genuine intelligence...
    This I can understand - if you think of thinking speed as a sign of intelligence, I can understand that.

    The abuse of a system does not mean it should be abolished. It means we should improve the system. You can't just give up on all people with disabilities because the system isn't working - that is not their fault...
    This is not true usually Science and Maths exams can have very strict time limits, I'm sure a lot of Maths and Science students wouldn't agree with you.

    You fail to understand that a lot of the time slow writing speed=slow mental speed(thats been the case for most of the disabilities talked about so far on the thread).

    Some of the time I have worked out the answers not that long after leaving the exam and would have done a bit better with more time(I did complete the rest of that Computer exam after the exam and what I did was pretty good so with more time my mark would have been a lot better).

    I do agree with you to some extent on Physical disabilities but if its a mental disability that certainly should be tested.I have handwriting issues when writing with speed like essays so I got to do my Geography AS on a computer with the same time limit though, I think the main issue was the hand just can't write as fast as the brain(
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    If you had extra time in your exams, (for those who don't already have it) do you genuinely think you would get significantly better grades?
    Yes. I never get time to check over my work - I'm always rushing by the end of the exam. If I had extra time, I'd be able to look for errors in my work and correct them to gain marks hence achieve more marks. Although I wouldn't claim for it because I would 'like' it - some people are at a disadvantage and need to be leveled out with others to make tests fair.
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    (Original post by Martins1)
    How is this a dumbing down of exams? It's the exact same material, so its not being dumbed down, although giving everyone adequate time would make it easier - NOT dumbed down. And the reason we have a time limit is because otherwise in English, RS, History and Classics literature people would write an absolute tonne - which would be impossible to mark. All that is happening with extra time is that people are recieving what is essentially the same aount of time in proportion to their writing speed. Person A is no less intelligent than Person B because they broke their hand and so have a slower writing speed... The same is true of those who just naturally have slow writing speed. That's why science/maths exams are very rarely ever time pressured - because they are testing ability and knowledge, and people won't write tonnes even with extra time. In time pressured exams, it's only there for practical reasons.
    But they wouldn't because although in actual time they get more, due to their disabilities, their time in proportion to their writing speed is therefore the same as yours is - and often its actually less. Imagine if you started an exam and literally after reading the five word question in a few seconds, continously write at full speed, getting everything correct. However, despite knowing exactly what more you needed to write down, you PYSICALLY could not complete the exam on account of your writing speed. Imagine how frustrating that would be and how frustrated you would be, having revised and worked hard for the exam, and knowing that you KNEW all the asnwers but your writing speed let you down. Exams should not be a test of writing speed, but genuine intelligence...
    This I can understand - if you think of thinking speed as a sign of intelligence, I can understand that.

    The abuse of a system does not mean it should be abolished. It means we should improve the system. You can't just give up on all people with disabilities because the system isn't working - that is not their fault...
    Making an exam easier is dumbing it down, I think most people who are of reasonable intelligence(especially when it comes down to University when most people are pretty clever) could get most of the test right if you give them enough time to see the trick to the question, if they haven't revised maybe not though.At University I think speed is the main skill that discriminates the best from the worst, often the homework questions were much harder than the exam questions and I really struggled but I generally eventually always got there which kinda of proves my point.

    Also, The Programming exam is the perfect example I have little doubt in my mind my two friends who scored 20% and 32% on the exam respectively would have got around 80% on the exam with sufficient time(thats the kind of score they got for their coursework).I completed the rest of the exam after I had to submit as the exam had finished at my University accommodation its clear I would have probably had 80 or 90% rather than the 60% I got getting everything right but only completing 60% of the exam.

    I have been talking about Maths/Science exams so far and its clear that this is utterly false(the friend I had who didn't end up completing quite a few questions was a Science student) and I often find these exams are rushed to the end its not always the case some of my Maths exams I finished reasonably early but quite a few my exams(2+Computer exam) this year in Maths/Physics I didn't finish and other exams I was rushed to the end(happened very often with A2 Mathematics exams too) and this also obviously meant no time for checking, something which extra time makes a lot easier to do.

    So far most of the main disabilities that have been mentioned refer to slower brain processing rather than some physical disability.People with Mental disabilities shouldn't be given extra time for it if that is whats being assessed on the paper, which often they are and strict time limits illustrate this.I do have sympathy for physical illnesses like if dyslexia was some sight problem I'd be more sympathetic but research shows it is a problem with areas of the brain responsible for language processes/reading.

    On the subject of writing speed vs brain speed I often find my brain speed is much faster than my writing speed as it simply isn't possible to write as fast as my brain can think(especially on essays my brain is usually miles ahead) and this often means terrible handwriting with my hand trying to catch up, for my Geography AS I was given a laptop instead to account for this but the same time limit, this is a reasonable adjustment to me.I didn't get some answers down in time on the exam either that were in my brain so thats pretty common I think.
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    Yes,although some people do cheat the system.
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    (Original post by Martins1)
    Well yes, that sounds like cheating the system to me. At the same time, I'd be very surprised if they aren't getting any external diagnosis. Either way, just because people cheat, doesn't mean we can give up on people who NEED this help and extra time - it just means we need to fix the system - so that schools such as yours can not get away with that and so that everyone needs external diagnosis. Just to say, that although there is no "extra time" in life, there are also no exams. How many times have you EVER heard of an employer ask their employee to sit down without the aid of the internet and complete as much as they can in an hour? Never, assignments are typically given much more time and much more freedom to carry out how and when you like.
    In my school I referenced one person with extra time - he has extremely slow handwriting - I've seen it in exams and man do I feel sorry for him. The two people I know who have supervised rest breaks; well one has frequent panic attacks and the other has a rare heart condition. The latter is in my English set and before the English speaking and listening I witnessed him having a panic attack. It was truly terrifying and there was no way he could complete his speaking and listening - our teacher moved it back a week for him. As he became stressed he started putting his head in his hands, lashing out violently at anyone who tried to help and breathing heavily. That 100% deserves supervised rest breaks in order to stop that happening.

    I've never witnessed schools 'coaching' kids for extra time - but that is plain wrong. I'm not sure how anyone can fake the test that you had - surely it seizes up or it doesn't? On a more personal note I would drop the subject of extra time with your friend because it's not worth losing a friendship over extra time in exams - friendship is far more important than any grades
    YES YES YES and YES! So very true - the fact is exams do not equal intelligence and sadly school life is now solely focused on getting grades when it should be about expanding your horizons, forming your own opinions on world views and the important questions in life, getting morals (which would stop people cheating on tests out of moral conscience) and most importantly forming interests - so that people know where they want to go and feel impassioned by what they do so that they can have an enjoyable life. BTEC's stigma is another thing which needs to be fixed - this is why I created the thread about educational reform, so please do comment on there as I guess we are sidetracking a lot...
    Sadly people believe only in equality nowadays - the fact is equality is not fair - equality in OPPORTUNITY is what is fair and we should be moving towards that, rather than just out and out equality.
    I would even say try not to be bitter towards the system - just try to help reform the system nicely, its more likely to get done then - and you are completely right - just because a system is flawed, doesn't mean you give up on it and scrap it - no you work and improve it!

    Either way, its a good idea to get diagnosed to see what the genuine situation is rather than wondering around blindly in the dark.
    I think you might be getting it here if you were to make everything equal then everyone would get the same on the exam(even motivation and determination to work hard are affected by genes/environmental factors).

    I do think part of this extra time idea is that if people work hard and they are not getting good grades then they must have some sort of disability and this isn't fair, this really just a manipulative argument to try and manipulate people to become capitalist/right wing believers that rich people got all their money through hard work.

    Most of the success a person will achieve will be down to their intelligence/talents and not due to their hard work, if I didn't work I would have still probably got decent grades(probably As and Bs instead of A*s and As, as I think in most cases hard work will only get you maybe a grade or two).This can also be illustrated how usually clever people do well throughout school even when they were too young too work hard.I did start working hard probably about Y6 but before that I still did well and this can also be seen when a teacher introduces a new topic and some people fly away and understand it completely and most people struggle.For example when the class was introduced to factorising quadratics the teacher had to reteach it all again and hold back the class delaying the exam until a later exam period as everyone couldn't do it apart from me because as she said I could do it in my head.

    If we were to create a fully equal system we would have to create penalities for advantages people have(calling them abilities or antidisabilities).
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    (Original post by Martins1)
    Well yes, that sounds like cheating the system to me. At the same time, I'd be very surprised if they aren't getting any external diagnosis. Either way, just because people cheat, doesn't mean we can give up on people who NEED this help and extra time - it just means we need to fix the system - so that schools such as yours can not get away with that and so that everyone needs external diagnosis. Just to say, that although there is no "extra time" in life, there are also no exams. How many times have you EVER heard of an employer ask their employee to sit down without the aid of the internet and complete as much as they can in an hour? Never, assignments are typically given much more time and much more freedom to carry out how and when you like.
    In my school I referenced one person with extra time - he has extremely slow handwriting - I've seen it in exams and man do I feel sorry for him. The two people I know who have supervised rest breaks; well one has frequent panic attacks and the other has a rare heart condition. The latter is in my English set and before the English speaking and listening I witnessed him having a panic attack. It was truly terrifying and there was no way he could complete his speaking and listening - our teacher moved it back a week for him. As he became stressed he started putting his head in his hands, lashing out violently at anyone who tried to help and breathing heavily. That 100% deserves supervised rest breaks in order to stop that happening.
    Here are five examples, Lidl require an online exam, as do the army, but in person, and the same for the navy and air force. The Civil service fast stream also require an exam, as does public service in many countries.

    Also, I meant that in life those with "disabilities" do not get advantages in any other case, it is is silly to give it to them when they are children. Ironically it is a childish thought.I also think that everybody should be subject to the same conditions, learning disability or not. If exams were purely a test of knowledge, then we would all be allowed to use computers, and the time constraints wouldn't exist.
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    (Original post by Martins1)
    How many times have you EVER heard of an employer ask their employee to sit down without the aid of the internet and complete as much as they can in an hour? Never,
    I accept you can normally get access to the internet whilst working but completing as much as you can in an hour happens all the time. The ability to process a lot of information rapidly and make decisions based on it is a vital skill in many jobs.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    I accept you can normally get access to the internet whilst working but completing as much as you can in an hour happens all the time. The ability to process a lot of information rapidly and make decisions based on it is a vital skill in many jobs.
    Very few jobs ask you to do that - time constraints are in most jobs much longer and in the few which do have such short constraints, people who are unable to work in these environments don't go into these work places anyway. It is not necessary to be able to do this, although it is useful in many jobs.
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    (Original post by V ugvg jhi)
    Here are five examples, Lidl require an online exam, as do the army, but in person, and the same for the navy and air force. The Civil service fast stream also require an exam, as does public service in many countries.
    Online exam. Not written. And for that matter, I'm not sure that it's gonna be the most challenging exam ever, considering it is testing basic mathematical functions. The army one is also online - I did it and it was not in any way hard.
    Also, I meant that in life those with "disabilities" do not get advantages in any other case, it is is silly to give it to them when they are children. Ironically it is a childish thought.I also think that everybody should be subject to the same conditions, learning disability or not. If exams were purely a test of knowledge, then we would all be allowed to use computers, and the time constraints wouldn't exist.
    There is the British Equality act which helps people with disabilities in getting equal rights and fair working environment...
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)

    So far most of the main disabilities that have been mentioned refer to slower brain processing rather than some physical disability.People with Mental disabilities shouldn't be given extra time for it if that is whats being assessed on the paper, which often they are and strict time limits illustrate this.I do have sympathy for physical illnesses like if dyslexia was some sight problem I'd be more sympathetic but research shows it is a problem with areas of the brain responsible for language processes/reading, you will often find people trying to claim its caused by something else or its like glasses for a person with bad sight and that is just lies to try and get away from the fact dyslexia is dumbness at reading.
    The disabilities you're talking about, have nothing to do with slower brain processing. You really are showing your ignorance here. Maybe you should read up on what Autism and Dyslexia really are. Dyslexia isn't dumbness. I've met some quite intelligent people who are intelligent who have Dyslexia.

    People with Autism, our brains work differently. We don't process things slower than you. We process things differently.
 
 
 
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