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    (Original post by Serpentine111)
    It is definitely a bit disturbing seeing how excited a pure mathematician can get talking about their subject, I love mathematics but I could never endure doing it for the sake of it and not knowing why I'm learning it
    That's because your not a pure mathematician.Just remember pure mathematical areas like Hilbert space and Riemann geometry has made theoretical physicists life easier.
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    (Original post by CancerousProblem)
    My dad says physics is super important because it underlines our fundamental understanding of the universe, so he was quite mad at me when I got a B for our Physics mock, but so far A level physics seems rather dull to me and has done little to enhance my understanding. All the difficulties in A level physics tests don't seem to have much to do with actual physics but instead just examiners trying to trip you up by sneakily adding a trap to every other question like changing the units and making the exam super time-pressured, so you don't have time to check or go through each question carefully. (I do OCR Specification B, and this is what Physics in Action feels like.)

    In a sense, this subject doesn't feel like a real subject. It definitely doesn't feel as 'real' as mathematics, for some reason, and I find it hard to see physics as a subject that can even rival mathematics in terms of the depth and beauty. The abstract thought that mathematics revolves around is far more elegant and permanent than physics.

    (This is almost as bad as A level economics, which I feel has almost no depth at all to the subject and shouldn't really be a subject: Economics is really just common sense with a few fancy words, definitions, and models that you have to remember.)

    I'm doing further maths, maths, physics and economics for a levels, with maths being my favorite subject. I'm starting to feel an increasingly strong dislike towards Physics the more I do it. My a level exam board doesn't seem to show ANY link between the two subjects, apart from a very basic key-stage-3 sort of level.

    One time, one of my dads friends heard I liked maths, so he recommended a book to me and said "if you like maths you'll like this book". It was called "The Universe". I flicked through it and it looked like maths, but after reading a few pages I quickly realized that it was more of a physics book than a maths book. I instantly put the book down in disgust, I felt almost as if I was cheated, as I was expecting a more meaningful experience.

    How do people who have tasted the remarkable beauty of maths even like this cancerous subject?
    Physics involves lots of maths.

    I personally love maths and, like you, dislike physics (though I don't feel the strong resentment towards it you seem to...). I enjoy learning about the world, but the mathematics involved in physics is not my cup of tea at all, plus I am very bad at it! I much prefer pure maths... algebra, group theory, logic. It's personal preference.

    xxx
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    (Original post by lerjj)
    This was basically my point. If you don't do work beyond the syllabus, the A level is rather boring. Maths A level does not require you to do much problem solving, but has a lot of plug-and-chug exercises which simply need you to memorise formulas. It does enable you to do problem solving, however.

    The same is true of physics- the A level involves little that is really interesting, because it doesn't teach that qualitatively. But it teaches enough of the principles that you can combine it with some maths and then do some actual physics. If you just learnt what's on the syllabus for either maths or physics, you'd probably be bored out of your mind.

    A nice example is that you get taught Fermat's principle of least time when dealing with refraction, this gives you the principle from which you can derive important results, but you'd never be asked to show it in an exam because A level physics doesn't contain that much maths.
    I think the Maths and Further Maths A Levels are quite exciting and as with virtually everything you can learn loads of formulaes or you can start really understanding the Maths instead.Mechanics at A Level is anything but plug and chug on a lot of questions there are a lot of applied Mechanics questions asked thats what makes it so hard.
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    (Original post by CancerousProblem)
    (This is almost as bad as A level economics, which I feel has almost no depth at all to the subject and shouldn't really be a subject: Economics is really just common sense with a few fancy words, definitions, and models that you have to remember.)


    How do people who have tasted the remarkable beauty of maths even like this cancerous subject?
    Physics at A level does not have the detailed maths it's supposed to because not everyone who picks it does maths.
    And I kind of agree that physics is just extending your knowledge more than your understanding at A level because of the lack of maths which is necessary to fully understand things. e.g. you need to know about complex numbers to fully understand some of the electricity stuff but they cannot do that.
    Physics is beautiful when you do learn the harder stuff with proper maths.
    And economics is kinda useless ( a lot worse than physics) and I agree with what you wrote.

    If you haven't done A2 phsyics, then it gets a lot more interesting there with the introduction of quarks and stuff (for me).
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    (Original post by Kadak)
    Loads of pure mathematicians don't really like physicists though.

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    how on earth did you come up with that conclusion.
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    (Original post by ETRC)
    how on earth did you come up with that conclusion.


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Because many physicists like michio kaku have admitted it.Many pure mathematicians have said it and watch bbc horizon mathematical history tour.At the beginning it's made clear mathematicians don't like physicists.Or watch michio kaku is God a mathematician? Not to mention on this thread you can sense some friction between the physicists and pure mathematicians.
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    (Original post by Kadak)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Because many physicists like michio kaku have admitted it.Many pure mathematicians have said it and watch bbc horizon mathematical history tour.At the beginning it's made clear mathematicians don't like physicists.Or watch michio kaku is God a mathematician? Not to mention on this thread you can sense some friction between the physicists and pure mathematicians.
    I am not so sure though as the head of maths at my college did Physics as a degree but has now pretty much become a pure mathematician so does He hate his past self?I think its common that Maths and Physics are transferable and although one might be a Physicist now they may be a Mathematician in the future, I have discussions about Mathematics with my Physics teachers.
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    (Original post by Kadak)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Because many physicists like michio kaku have admitted it.Many pure mathematicians have said it and watch bbc horizon mathematical history tour.At the beginning it's made clear mathematicians don't like physicists.Or watch michio kaku is God a mathematician? Not to mention on this thread you can sense some friction between the physicists and pure mathematicians.
    Ah, i haven't followed michio kaku lately so didn't know he admitted it,
    but you can't give this thread as some sort of evidence cos it's TSR lol.
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    (Original post by Kadak)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Because many physicists like michio kaku have admitted it.Many pure mathematicians have said it and watch bbc horizon mathematical history tour.At the beginning it's made clear mathematicians don't like physicists.Or watch michio kaku is God a mathematician? Not to mention on this thread you can sense some friction between the physicists and pure mathematicians.
    I doubt it's actual friction, more like friendly insults about who's work is more fundamental. Feynman gave a good talk about the difference somewhere... I'll try and find the YouTube clip.
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    I love maths but I hate physics. To be fair, I'm more of a stats person than i am a calculus person, so I guess that explains why.
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    (Original post by lerjj)
    I doubt it's actual friction, more like friendly insults about who's work is more fundamental. Feynman gave a good talk about the difference somewhere... I'll try and find the YouTube clip.
    Don't bother already watched the clip lots of times.Pretty funny too.
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    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    I love maths but I hate physics. To be fair, I'm more of a stats person than i am a calculus person, so I guess that explains why.
    I am a little bit confuse. You love mathematics, but you have a minor interest in calculation? so do you love merely certain aspects of mathematics, not as a whole?
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    I am a little bit confuse. You love mathematics, but you have a minor interest in calculation? so do you love merely certain aspects of mathematics, not as a whole?
    Oh no no, I still like calculus but my favourite thing in maths would have to be stats. The aspect of maths I hate the most would have to be decision *shivers*. Other than that, I'd say I can appreciate maths as a whole
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    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    Oh no no, I still like calculus but my favourite thing in maths would have to be stats. The aspect of maths I hate the most would have to be decision *shivers*. Other than that, I'd say I can appreciate maths as a whole
    And what about calculations in physics? does this seem not be interesting for you?
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    And what about calculations in physics? does this seem not be interesting for you?
    Yeah, mechanics is pretty cool but then if you throw magnetic forces, subatomic particles and circuits at me, I'll run away
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    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    Yeah, mechanics is pretty cool but then if you throw magnetic forces, subatomic particles and circuits at me, I'll run away
    Mechanics is not cool, trust me, it's horrible.

    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    Oh no no, I still like calculus but my favourite thing in maths would have to be stats. The aspect of maths I hate the most would have to be decision *shivers*. Other than that, I'd say I can appreciate maths as a whole
    But physics has statistics in it too... Statistical Thermodynamics, Statistical Mechanics etc.
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    How far do physics and maths mechanics overlap?
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    Also, even though mechanics is the hardest, how much easier is the topic if studied in conjuction with physics?
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    (Original post by Greatthinker)
    Also, even though mechanics is the hardest, how much easier is the topic if studied in conjuction with physics?
    To me it's more that the mechanics in Physics is really easy if you do Mechanics 1 in Maths. That's on AS.
 
 
 
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