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    (Original post by Anna98uk)
    I don't think I even know a case study for sea level rise like the Maldives.
    Just remember 57 were killed in Mt St. Helens, 15 km or ash and dust over Portland
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    (Original post by Zulq)
    My topics are: restless earth, coastal zone and water on land... Any tips on what to revise?

    Good luck!!!


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    Weathering processes (freeze-thaw, temperature changes) and mass movement for Water on Land.
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    (Original post by Zulq)
    My topics are: restless earth, coastal zone and water on land... Any tips on what to revise?

    Good luck!!!


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    i tink it will be on that meander crap dug cuz lika uz getta a big monnei for da futuruh of youz as indivisusullal geeki guy.
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    (Original post by AAls)
    I learnt all three of those volcanoes but I will pick Nyiragongo since the name sounds epic Perhaps formation of a meander and a floodplain will come up. Maybe comparing effects/responses of a flood in a MEDC to an LEDC. I just hope the questions are mainly labeling/ formation of stuff, I hate it when they tell u to look at OS Maps when there's literally nothing to look at.
    OS maps are literally the worst. Like in class when you say "there is nothing to comment on?!" and then your teacher labels off like 60 things in one square... Gah
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    (Original post by jonahfromtonga)
    OS maps are literally the worst. Like in class when you say "there is nothing to comment on?!" and then your teacher labels off like 60 things in one square... Gah
    Exactly!
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    (Original post by jonahfromtonga)
    OS maps are literally the worst. Like in class when you say "there is nothing to comment on?!" and then your teacher labels off like 60 things in one square... Gah
    The exam will be easy..... Don't worry fellow munchkins ! Just remember that the hardest part of geography is that meanders have outer bends and inner bends , where in the inner bend you have depostion due to less friction of water with sea bed and more erosion on the outer bend due to less friction of water with the sea bed.I reckon 89% of students will get A* distiction grade in this course as last year nearly 90% got A*'s.
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    (Original post by MrTechGamer)
    The exam will be easy..... Don't worry fellow munchkins ! Just remember that the hardest part of geography is that meanders have outer bends and inner bends , where in the inner bend you have depostion due to less friction of water with sea bed and more erosion on the outer bend due to less friction of water with the sea bed.I reckon 89% of students will get A* distiction grade in this course as last year nearly 90% got A*'s.
    Maybe I wont get my A* because i was meant to say more more friction in the inner bend.
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    Can someone tell me. The case study for Three Gorges Dam, what question would be asked for this case study to be used?
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    (Original post by MrTechGamer)
    Maybe I wont get my A* because i was meant to say more more friction in the inner bend.
    I was ready to point that out really 90% ?
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    (Original post by MrTechGamer)
    Maybe I wont get my A* because i was meant to say more more friction in the inner bend.
    The fastest flow is always on the outside of the bend. In a way the inside is the side with the most friction, but its best not to talk about 'friction', just deposition and erosion.
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    (Original post by ozmo19)
    Can someone tell me. The case study for Three Gorges Dam, what question would be asked for this case study to be used?
    "Using a case study, describe and explain the issues of building a dam" (8 marks).

    So for something like this they'd want around 4-6 explained points, and you'd try to have some advantages and disadvantages, and relate them to economic/social/environmental, as well as adding in some specific facts like the dam gets (?) tourists per year, or (?) people had to be relocated in order to construct the dam etc.
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    (Original post by neon_reaper)
    "Using a case study, describe and explain the issues of building a dam" (8 marks).

    So for something like this they'd want around 4-6 explained points, and you'd try to have some advantages and disadvantages, and relate them to economic/social/environmental, as well as adding in some specific facts like the dam gets (?) tourists per year, or (?) people had to be relocated in order to construct the dam etc.
    I was just confused as whether they could be as specific to a dam as the specification states dam/reservoir which i thought mean either one. This would be quite a good question to come up though
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    (Original post by neon_reaper)
    The fastest flow is always on the outside of the bend. In a way the inside is the side with the most friction, but its best not to talk about 'friction', just deposition and erosion.
    In essence , you are correct , but you must also consider the fact that the water flows fastest in the outside bend , as a result of a high depth of water which in turn means that there would be less friction between the water and the river bed , allowing the water to flow faster.This means that in the outer bend there is more energy for erosional processes such as hydraulic action to erode bank creating a river cliff.In the inner bend there is less depth of water meaning that there would be less friction between the water and the river bed , thus hosting a slower flow of water , meaning that sediments are more likely to be deposited , creating slip-off slopes.Although you may get away with not mentioning frictional forces etc it is better to mention them , to gain more marks but as it would probaly be 3-4 mark question , so you don't have to mention absolutley everything.
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    (Original post by ozmo19)
    Can someone tell me. The case study for Three Gorges Dam, what question would be asked for this case study to be used?
    Probably along the lines of the advantages and disadvantages of hard engineerings
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    (Original post by neon_reaper)
    "Using a case study, describe and explain the issues of building a dam" (8 marks).

    So for something like this they'd want around 4-6 explained points, and you'd try to have some advantages and disadvantages, and relate them to economic/social/environmental, as well as adding in some specific facts like the dam gets (?) tourists per year, or (?) people had to be relocated in order to construct the dam etc.
    So if it was specifically issues, i would include:
    1. Several large towns upstream, such as Fuling (population=80,000) and Wanxian (population=140,000) will be flooded.a. Ancient temples, burial grounds and other historic sites will be lost beneath the reservoir too.
    2. Over 1.3 million people will have to be relocated.
    3. Much of the land used for resettlement is over 800m above sea level, where the climate is colder and the soil can barely support farming.
    4. The pressure created by the huge weight of the water in the reservoir behind the dam could trigger earthquakes.
    5. The untreated human and industrial waste will not be washed away downstream, but will stay and pollute the river instead.
    6. Areas downstream will be deprived of fertile sediment.
    7. It will divert money from other developments. It is currently one of the most expensive projects in the world, costing more than $26 billion, over their budget.

    This would be fine?
    Sorry about this, we hadn't studied a dam case study in class, just the reservoir (Rutland Water)
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    Middle course questions for water on the land haven't come up since 2011
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    (Original post by lilbunni)
    This just made me panic! I forgot about that case study. In fact, I barely know any of the statistics or facts for most of my case studies. Is it essential to quote statistics for a high grade? :confused:
    My teacher says (and I quite agree) that as long as it sounds realistic, you can bullcrap a lot of the statistics. For example, Maldives, it actually is 1.5m above sea level, and 80% of the land is below 1m above sea level. The examiner isn't going to check what you put- as long as it sounds realistic. So if you forget that number, just say "It's above 2m sea level, but around 70% of it is 1m." Or something like that. It's realistic, it basically says and has the same impact as the real statistics, you've just been given another set of statistics. Not everyone has the same revision guides or powerpoint slides for revision which has the same statistics.
    Top Tip: Spend today looking over the case studies before you go in (Last minute revision is probably best for case studies and their details ) Good Luck, you'll be fine! Just bullcrap it if you need to.
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    For the topic of coasts, what could you be asked about for a case study of cliff collapse?(e.g. Holderness Coast)
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    (Original post by ozmo19)
    So if it was specifically issues, i would include:
    1. Several large towns upstream, such as Fuling (population=80,000) and Wanxian (population=140,000) will be flooded.a. Ancient temples, burial grounds and other historic sites will be lost beneath the reservoir too.
    2. Over 1.3 million people will have to be relocated.
    3. Much of the land used for resettlement is over 800m above sea level, where the climate is colder and the soil can barely support farming.
    4. The pressure created by the huge weight of the water in the reservoir behind the dam could trigger earthquakes.
    5. The untreated human and industrial waste will not be washed away downstream, but will stay and pollute the river instead.
    6. Areas downstream will be deprived of fertile sediment.
    7. It will divert money from other developments. It is currently one of the most expensive projects in the world, costing more than $26 billion, over their budget.

    This would be fine?
    Sorry about this, we hadn't studied a dam case study in class, just the reservoir (Rutland Water)
    Sorry that I replied so late. It would probably help to include some of the positive aspects of it; the advantages, but those points were very good
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    (Original post by shannon5550)
    For the topic of coasts, what could you be asked about for a case study of cliff collapse?(e.g. Holderness Coast)
    Like what effect it had on people or why it was eroding ?? Businesses and houses effected , hydraulic action , weak + soft boulder clay . Has anyone done the Iceland case study
 
 
 
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