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    The main issue I have with this is one of sexism in the workplace, not sexism full stop (though sexism remains a problem in other contexts). That's why I take issue with the right-wing press on this one, who are not hesitating to point out Proudman's actions on other platforms. This is to do with work. Men have long been at the forefront of the white-collar professions and inappropriate comments and actions have long been a problem. LinkedIn is an extension of the workplace in that the context and register relate to business. The workplace and LinkedIn by extension are not platforms for socialising let alone chatting people up, especially between acquaintances as is the case here. Facebook and Tinder exist for those purposes. I wouldn't feel comfortable at work (now imagining a lewd comment from my line manager, ugh!) or on LinkedIn, but I would definitely be cooler with it on Tinder.

    This can be extended to other places where comments are likely to be inappropriate - such as on public transport and in the street.

    In her shoes, though, I would not have taken to Twitter without redacting the fellow's name - I don't think his job or personal life should be at risk because of an inappropriate comment. In any case, hers will have been affected too.
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    (Original post by redferry)
    Well if you're gonna insist women are as bad as men (which statistics show isn't the case but hey ho - in academia for example women experience far far higher levels of unprofessional behaviour directed towards them) then you have to at least admit more workplaces are male dominated than female dominated. Therefore it is more of an issue this way round.

    Also most female dominated fields are in the public sector, where this crap is far less tolerated.
    Utter delusion.
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    (Original post by MetalAlchemist)
    I was watching the news today, and I looked into this "Sexism Row" discussion.

    A female lawyer accused a male lawyer for being sexist, because he gave her a compliment. He said that her picture is "stunning" and was highly offended by this comment.

    Now, she has made it a big deal to the point where it's on National TV and she is still trying justify herself on why the comment is sexist.

    The male lawyer is also being shamed on television, because of it!!!!

    I think it's a ridiculous accusation.

    What do you think about this?
    the male lawyer is guilty of a serious lapse of judgement. the lady in question is a minger.
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    Hmm a bit unprofessional without knowing them better though equally unprofessional to name and shame him since tbh his comment was hardly rude/sexist.

    Which leads me to ask...since many relationships do start in the workplace, how is a man who finds a co-worker attractive and may wish to ask her out on a date/form a relationship supposed to make her aware of his attraction (even if he does get shot down) without being a sexist prick? I mean...we do reproduce sexually, it would seem some women would make this quite difficult indeed.

    If I say to a co-worker where you're free to wear what you like "you look really good in that dress"...that is sexist and not a compliment then? Can I compliment a new haircut.....it's all very confusing. Is it because men tend to compliment women on appearance more than the other way around? Maybe women should return the favour, "you look really handsome in that suit you know", I'd just assume she was into me if that was said tbh, so it's thanks but I'm taken lol.
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    (Original post by redferry)
    This!

    Women in male dominated workplaces have to put up with this **** constantly, when will people understand that a) we couldn't give a flying **** what you think about our looks and b) professional environments are not the place to hit on people.

    It's not the same for men, it just isn't. My partner used to work somewhere dominated by older women. People treated him as a professional equal and he wasn't hit on once.
    Why don't you work in a female only environment...
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    (Original post by TheThiefOfBagdad)
    The comment was wrong in the context it was given, undoubtedly, but, as others have said, so was making the guy's name public.
    She is doing this to advance her public image (probably looking for a way in to politics) ("...has been building up her media profile for the past three years by writing for the Guardian, the Independent and several magazines, as well as being a guest on BBC Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour..." and I sincerely hope it backfires for her catastrophically.
    "If men and women were truly equal, she said, “men’s genitals would be sliced up” in the same way that some women are subjected to female genital mutilation (FGM)"


    *rolls eyes*

    Sorry if these points have been covered, I cba to read all nine pages.
    lol. Basically male circumcision then
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    (Original post by bassbabe)
    Your sarcasm and non stop moaning is starting to get annoying as ****. Another radical feminist who clearly doesn't know what sexism really is.
    You might prefer that people see your appearance as more important than your abilities and achievements but I don't want to live in a world where people judge men and boys on their words and actions and women and girls on their looks. My body is no-one else's business. It is not public property to be talked about. Just because someone else thinks a comment on it is a compliment doesn't mean I do. I do not need to know anyone's opinion on my appearance to feel good about it and it's arrogant to think that I care what anyone else thinks.
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    (Original post by citydeer)
    yeah but thats on the daily mail
    So you think they forged the screenshots? Not a chance.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    It is not public property to be talked about.
    Pretty stupid line of reasoning to be honest. There are plenty of things that aren't public property that we all talk about.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    You might prefer that people see your appearance as more important than your abilities and achievements but I don't want to live in a world where people judge men and boys on their words and actions and women and girls on their looks. My body is no-one else's business. It is not public property to be talked about. Just because someone else thinks a comment on it is a compliment doesn't mean I do. I do not need to know anyone's opinion on my appearance to feel good about it and it's arrogant to think that I care what anyone else thinks.
    Apologies for being so harsh with my previous comment
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    You might prefer that people see your appearance as more important than your abilities and achievements but I don't want to live in a world where people judge men and boys on their words and actions and women and girls on their looks. My body is no-one else's business. It is not public property to be talked about. Just because someone else thinks a comment on it is a compliment doesn't mean I do. I do not need to know anyone's opinion on my appearance to feel good about it and it's arrogant to think that I care what anyone else thinks.
    You can get complimented on more than one thing by the way. If someone said "hey you did good work." And then another person said "You're good looking" that doesn't automatically mean my work is now **** lmao.

    I think alot of feminists are just autistic or something and very single minded.
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    I don't know if it makes any difference , but according to wiki,

    LinkedIn is a "social network site"
    LinkedIn probably describe it as a "business tool"


    A male of a certain age would be wise in any social. Circle or workplace about comments that can be misinterpreted , but she could have done this without the publicity
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    If someone said "hey you did good work."
    B-but you can't comment on my work, ****lord! It isn't public property for you to just... just comment upon!
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    (Original post by domonict)

    A male of a certain age would be wise in any social. Circle or workplace about comments that can be misinterpreted , but she could have done this without the publicity
    That would have been more sensible, given her apparent aims.

    It has a huge, profound effect on women’s career opportunities, making them feel uncomfortable working in male-dominated places, for example in the law. That is why I try to nip it in the bud before it escalates
    :facepalm:
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    (Original post by MetalAlchemist)
    I was watching the news today, and I looked into this "Sexism Row" discussion.

    A female lawyer accused a male lawyer for being sexist, because he gave her a compliment. He said that her picture is "stunning" and was highly offended by this comment.

    Now, she has made it a big deal to the point where it's on National TV and she is still trying justify herself on why the comment is sexist.

    The male lawyer is also being shamed on television, because of it!!!!

    I think it's a ridiculous accusation.

    What do you think about this?
    Yeah, I agree with you.
    all the feminizis on my Facebook were going mad. I 'liked' an article that a right-wing journalist wrote shaming the woman, and I noticed my friend count went down afterwards. I then investigated to see who had deleted me and realised it was the radical feminists ! Haha.

    Tbh if she was seriously insulted and wanted to shame him, she should at the very least of hidden both of their identities.
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    (Original post by The Free Radical)
    Why does he feel the need to compliment a female coworker on her appearance?

    Her appearance has zero relevance to her ability to effectively perform her job.
    And if so why did she feel the need to put a photo of herself on the website in the first place? And not any photo but clearly a professional one which had taken time, effort and money ?
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    You might prefer that people see your appearance as more important than your abilities and achievements but I don't want to live in a world where people judge men and boys on their words and actions and women and girls on their looks. My body is no-one else's business. It is not public property to be talked about. Just because someone else thinks a comment on it is a compliment doesn't mean I do. I do not need to know anyone's opinion on my appearance to feel good about it and it's arrogant to think that I care what anyone else thinks.
    Short fat ugly men agree.
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    QUOTE=bassbabe;59271427][/QUOTE]

    I reckon small town girl is the type of woman to scream at men for being sexist when they hold the door open for her.[/QUOTE]

    I reckon so too.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    You might prefer that people see your appearance as more important than your abilities and achievements but I don't want to live in a world where people judge men and boys on their words and actions and women and girls on their looks. My body is no-one else's business. It is not public property to be talked about. Just because someone else thinks a comment on it is a compliment doesn't mean I do. I do not need to know anyone's opinion on my appearance to feel good about it and it's arrogant to think that I care what anyone else thinks.
    Rubbish. Everyone is judged on their looks and appearance, regardless of gender or race. You can't deny that an attractive man has a higher chance of being hired over someone with the same qualifications but is short, ugly and ugly.
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    (Original post by lachachacha)
    Yeah, I agree with you. all the feminizis on my Facebook were going mad. I 'liked' an article that a right-wing journalist wrote shaming the woman, and I noticed my friend count went down afterwards. I then investigated to see who had deleted me and realised it was the radical feminists ! Haha.Tbh if she was seriously insulted and wanted to shame him, she should at the very least of hidden both of their identities.
    :lol: Where do you find these people?

    Tbh, they're just bitter because you didn't agree with the situation.

    You don't need them.

    I totally agree with you. She shouldn't have exposed their identity like that.

    Reading over what the guy said, he seemed hesitant to compliment her in the following sentence: "I appreciate that this is probably horrendously politically incorrect...".

    It's very embarrassing and it gives feminists a bad name.
 
 
 
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