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    To a great extent IB's difficultness is overrated. When you search online about how to do well on IB it say's stuff like 'work hard' and 'don't expect to sleep' but after sometime I have learned that IB's not about that. So here is what I think is the secret to success generally in IB:


    • Read and understand what the rubric wants!


    [I cannot stress this enough!! IB grades are really based on the rubric! Many people don't read the rubric or don't understand what to they should do in an assignment so they fail to get a good grade even if the assignment was executed perfectly.]



    • So after you finish an assignment (and while you work) go through the rubric and make a checklist, what did I do and what am I missing.


    [That way you can guarantee a high score at least because at the end of the day the rubric is very subjective to the teacher.]



    • If you are taking a science learn how the mark-scheme works by correcting many papers/tests and seeing how your teacher corrects a paper.


    [This is important because that way you can expect what a certain question requires from you, and if it's from 5 marks for example you know how the 5 marks are distributed on the solution.


    • In the English IOC you must NEVER BE TENSE!!


    [Many times students do poorly on IOC's because they are tense and therefore get confused a lot during the presentation, say a lot of um's and ahh's which reflects on knowledge and understand of the text, fail to analyze some and take note of important pieces in the passage]


    • Don't Slack!


    [dont slack, when you get assigned a homework do it once you get home even if its due after a week. This helps you remember what you did in school a lot better later on, I guarantee you will get a higher score and it shows that you are professional and teachers will really respect you later on so if you do forget an assignment they'll cut you some slack]

    I hope these tips helped and if you have any other tips you wanna add or simply want to comment please do so
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    I just couldn't let this thread be ignored to oblivion. Although the tips are constantly repeated on this forum, they are vital. I am a student in my first year and I'm not the very best. I am afraid of my IOC coming up for HL English and I'm not even ready, let alone prepared. I slack and procrastinate, thus I am not scoring greatly at the very moment. This only confirms that effort is needed to pass, especially HL physics.


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    (Original post by co2014)
    I just couldn't let this thread be ignored to oblivion. Although the tips are constantly repeated on this forum, they are vital. I am a student in my first year and I'm not the very best. I am afraid of my IOC coming up for HL English and I'm not even ready, let alone prepared. I slack and procrastinate, thus I am not scoring greatly at the very moment. This only confirms that effort is needed to pass, especially HL physics.


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    I agree with several of the OPs original points and tips.

    I took the IB as an alternative to Alevels and after the end of it I now feel like I made the right choice.

    My tips for work would be:
    1. Get atleast 8 hours of sleep a night
    2. Do not work later than 23:30
    3. Get started on work as soon as you can, almost immediately after the lesson if you can. For essays this will ensure you remember the points clearly and prevent you from forgetting things. For questions, it allows you enough time to go and see the teacher if you don't understand.
    4. Make copious notes during lessons as not to rely on handouts. Active note taking helps you learn better than just passive listening.
    5. Take an hour off each day to talk to your friends, watch TV, browse forums and listen to music. Expand your mind and your horizons as well as rote learn like a monkey.
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    I was also thinking that it would be a good idea to put the rubric into a checklist so when you're done writing the essay you can go through the checklist and see if you are missing anything
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    My advice is targeted on the subjects I take, because for different subjects you have to tackle it via different means.

    For maths: practice. It's simply inevitable. Went from a 4 to a 7 student just by actually doing the homework.

    For languages: listen in class. you don't even need to read the novels, what you DO need to do is listen in class. All the stuff you need (quotes to memorize, lit feats to use) will be explained by your teacher. If you have a ****ty teacher, sparknotes and schmoop is your new best friend.

    For sciences (excluding biology and ESS): past papers. most of the conceptual stuff in physics and chemistry will be engraved in your mind because you actually "KNOW" them. Follow that up with past paper practices and you'll be able to do the "MEMORIZATION" of the quotes, processes, etc.

    For social sciences (as well as biology and ESS): This is probably what you need to spend the most time on. For me it is. Pretty similar to the sciences, just that you need more "REVISION" before you get to the PRACTICE phase.

    I got predicted a 44/45 and although I'm certain I didn't work as hard as my peers (I slack off a lot), I'm glad I took some of the easiest subjects. If you're going to take IB, I strongly advise you NOT to take history or HL math. These two are the hardest subjects that my peers continuously struggle with. The textbook for History is thicker than all my subjects' combined.

    Anyway, writing this post has kickstarted my revision process. I have 11 days left to revise for the finals! I hope I can meet my predicted grade, and I wish you people the best of luck!!!
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    As a graduate of the IB, I approve of the points stated in the OP :proud:
    Good luck to everyone for the May exams! :thumbsup:
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    (Original post by Chemit)
    I got predicted a 44/45 and although I'm certain I didn't work as hard as my peers (I slack off a lot), I'm glad I took some of the easiest subjects. If you're going to take IB, I strongly advise you NOT to take history or HL math. These two are the hardest subjects that my peers continuously struggle with. The textbook for History is thicker than all my subjects' combined.
    I don't think you should advise people not take a subject just because it's difficult... don't shy away from a challenge, especially if you like the subject.
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    (Original post by Chemit)
    If you're going to take IB, I strongly advise you NOT to take history or HL math.
    I disagree here. I take both subjects, and while HL Maths has proven difficult to crack, it can be done if you work extensively on past papers.

    As far as History is concerned, if you can't write an essay, then you're going to find it challenging. But if you already have a solid essay-writing technique, particularly under timed conditions, then all you have to do is plough through information. I believe a good few of the people who take History do so because it's a case of 'resorting' to a humanities subject, which is why the number of candidates is so high. But the actual learning boils down to a skill set, and if you've got it, it's not overly hard to score marks.

    I'd argue that HL Maths is completely different. It's like giving a concert performance on the violin when you've never played before, and having to learn on the spot. But you get there eventually.

    OP's right about not slacking. Especially when it comes to coursework deadlines, ToK essays and the EE, if you leave it all to the last minute you're setting yourself up for pure, livid hell. But if your time management is decent, you leave yourself time to sleep and revise. IB's not about cramming; it's too much for that.
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    (Original post by Chemit)
    My advice is targeted on the subjects I take, because for different subjects you have to tackle it via different means.

    For maths: practice. It's simply inevitable. Went from a 4 to a 7 student just by actually doing the homework.

    For languages: listen in class. you don't even need to read the novels, what you DO need to do is listen in class. All the stuff you need (quotes to memorize, lit feats to use) will be explained by your teacher. If you have a ****ty teacher, sparknotes and schmoop is your new best friend.

    For sciences (excluding biology and ESS): past papers. most of the conceptual stuff in physics and chemistry will be engraved in your mind because you actually "KNOW" them. Follow that up with past paper practices and you'll be able to do the "MEMORIZATION" of the quotes, processes, etc.

    For social sciences (as well as biology and ESS): This is probably what you need to spend the most time on. For me it is. Pretty similar to the sciences, just that you need more "REVISION" before you get to the PRACTICE phase.

    I got predicted a 44/45 and although I'm certain I didn't work as hard as my peers (I slack off a lot), I'm glad I took some of the easiest subjects. If you're going to take IB, I strongly advise you NOT to take history or HL math. These two are the hardest subjects that my peers continuously struggle with. The textbook for History is thicker than all my subjects' combined.

    Anyway, writing this post has kickstarted my revision process. I have 11 days left to revise for the finals! I hope I can meet my predicted grade, and I wish you people the best of luck!!!
    What grade did you get in the IB? Do you have any advise for the EE (Extended Essay)? I have to submit by the end of September, fortunately I still have lots of time, but I am totally lost. I didn't even choose the topic! How many points did you get on the EE?
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    (Original post by Chemit)
    My advice is targeted on the subjects I take, because for different subjects you have to tackle it via different means.

    For maths: practice. It's simply inevitable. Went from a 4 to a 7 student just by actually doing the homework.

    For languages: listen in class. you don't even need to read the novels, what you DO need to do is listen in class. All the stuff you need (quotes to memorize, lit feats to use) will be explained by your teacher. If you have a ****ty teacher, sparknotes and schmoop is your new best friend.

    For sciences (excluding biology and ESS): past papers. most of the conceptual stuff in physics and chemistry will be engraved in your mind because you actually "KNOW" them. Follow that up with past paper practices and you'll be able to do the "MEMORIZATION" of the quotes, processes, etc.

    For social sciences (as well as biology and ESS): This is probably what you need to spend the most time on. For me it is. Pretty similar to the sciences, just that you need more "REVISION" before you get to the PRACTICE phase.

    I got predicted a 44/45 and although I'm certain I didn't work as hard as my peers (I slack off a lot), I'm glad I took some of the easiest subjects. If you're going to take IB, I strongly advise you NOT to take history or HL math. These two are the hardest subjects that my peers continuously struggle with. The textbook for History is thicker than all my subjects' combined.

    Anyway, writing this post has kickstarted my revision process. I have 11 days left to revise for the finals! I hope I can meet my predicted grade, and I wish you people the best of luck!!!
    What subjects did you take ?
    Rank from easy to hard
 
 
 
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