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    Hey, I am in year 12 and have a lifelong dream of relocating to North America. I've been told I should research applying to US Colleges but I don't know where to start! My A-Levels are probably going to be A*AA by the end of Year 13, and I am also hoping to apply to Oxbridge but have got weak GCSES due to having 4 years off school due to extremely ill health. But due to extenuating circumstances, I have been told I still have a chance.

    I am quite talented at History so that's where I'd like to have my major/degree in, but I don't know where to start with research and if the top US Colleges such as Stanford, would be out of reach for somebody with extenuating circumstances?

    Any good US colleges I could start looking at? Could someone please point me in the right direction?

    Also fees and things, since it's so expensive to study in America. My teacher said grants exist although I haven't found much evidence of this, but I've also been looking at scholarships but unsure if I have a chance at a scholarship.
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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)

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    Yes universities will take into account the extenuating circumstances when you apply. How much will it affect their decision? Frankly, it depends. There is not a yes or no answer. Judging by your A-level predictions, I would say it could possibly "balance" out your bad GCSE scores, and could show them you have the potential to be a successful student. Again, it really depends. Keep in mind when you apply to USA universities, you have to take either the SAT or ACT examination.
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    I'm sorry to hear about your healthHowever, I won't sugarcoat anything for you because I can tell you're serious. Being an international student has its pros. For example, colleges in America LOVE diversity. However, there's also a HUGE con:American students literally begin preparing to apply to American colleges since the age of 12/13. From taking ACT/SAT classes, garnering hundreds of volunteer hours, having dozens of long term extra curricular (sports, fine arts, work), and college courses-- you have your work cut out. It's competitive enough for American students, I can't imagine international students!As for scholarships, usually each school has an international scholarship and many grants.Stanford... my friends boyfriend goes there and I'm telling you now it's going to be hard. Just think about the scores needed to go there makes my head hurt (well, unless your gifted at a sport). I suggest finding another college that's not as competitve. There are SO many (go to collegeboard to find some).
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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    Any good US colleges I could start looking at? Could someone please point me in the right direction?

    Also fees and things, since it's so expensive to study in America. My teacher said grants exist although I haven't found much evidence of this, but I've also been looking at scholarships but unsure if I have a chance at a scholarship.
    yale, harvard and caltech is all i know and buy the way everything else is cheap like fuel and food etc.
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    (Original post by jamesthehustler)
    yale, harvard and caltech is all i know and buy the way everything else is cheap like fuel and food etc.
    I don't know where you got the idea that everything is cheap. First of all, as an international student, chances are you probably won't be driving on campus in the first place, and frankly, most students don't really drive.
    It's also really not cheap when you factor in the nearly 60,000 USD for tuition every year (including housing, textbooks etc)




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    (Original post by frognation22)
    I don't know where you got the idea that everything is cheap. First of all, as an international student, chances are you probably won't be driving on campus in the first place, and frankly, most students don't really drive.
    It's also really not cheap when you factor in the nearly 60,000 USD for tuition every year (including housing, textbooks etc)

    I'm not sure where you're getting your information from, but I suggest you focus on your A-levels, and if interested in USA universities, take the SAT or ACT, and then you can proceed from there...depending on your marks etc



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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    Hey, I am in year 12 and have a lifelong dream of relocating to North America. I've been told I should research applying to US Colleges but I don't know where to start! My A-Levels are probably going to be A*AA by the end of Year 13, and I am also hoping to apply to Oxbridge but have got weak GCSES due to having 4 years off school due to extremely ill health. But due to extenuating circumstances, I have been told I still have a chance.

    I am quite talented at History so that's where I'd like to have my major/degree in, but I don't know where to start with research and if the top US Colleges such as Stanford, would be out of reach for somebody with extenuating circumstances?

    Any good US colleges I could start looking at? Could someone please point me in the right direction?

    Also fees and things, since it's so expensive to study in America. My teacher said grants exist although I haven't found much evidence of this, but I've also been looking at scholarships but unsure if I have a chance at a scholarship.
    Perhaps consider studying in the UK and then relocating to NA after your degree.
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    (Original post by frognation22)
    I don't know where you got the idea that everything is cheap. First of all, as an international student, chances are you probably won't be driving on campus in the first place, and frankly, most students don't really drive.
    It's also really not cheap when you factor in the nearly 60,000 USD for tuition every year (including housing, textbooks etc)




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    well as the guy with a lot of family living there compared to the uk it's far cheaper
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    i've got family in california, new mexico, washington, florida, new york and north carolina
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    (Original post by jamesthehustler)
    well as the guy with a lot of family living there compared to the uk it's far cheaper
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    i've got family in california, new mexico, washington, florida, new york and north carolina
    That's great and all but you're missing the point, and again, once you have factored in tuition and accommodation costs it's really not going to be any cheaper. Also, keep in mind uni is 4 years there, not 3.

    At the end of the day, it's hard to even give you any advice because you have been very general in your questions/statements


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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    Any good US colleges I could start looking at? Could someone please point me in the right direction?
    To be honest, there are so many tertiary education institutions in the US that it is difficult to keep track of any beyond the major ones.

    I would suggest that you get the US News Top Colleges 2016, or Princeton Review's Best 380 Colleges. Both are available for the Kindle app via Amazon. Those two would be your best options for finding new universities/colleges.
 
 
 
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