Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

PLEASE HELP/ADVISE ME: Anxious cough in social places and at times at stress watch

Announcements
    Offline

    0
    SORRY THAT THERE ARE SPACES IN BETWEEN WORDS AND PARAGRAPHS; IT'S COPIED AND PASTED.

    Everyday, I experience an annoying tickle in my throat that causes me to cough (this is psychological). It often happens when stress is building up (i.e. I might have to face sitting exams) or due to what could bedeemed anxiety - although I don't think I suffer every symptom of it. I have completed my GCSE examinations, finished Year 11 (thelast academic year for compulsory education). However, because of my frequentcoughing, I was unable to complete Year 11 entirely - for the first time ever,my attendance fell below 98%; I estimate for this year I attended school foraround 87% of the time. I missed most of my school between the 10th March and13th May - beyond the latter date, I had exams which eventually finished on the17th June. Potentially, the absences could have impacted on my exam results.Everyday during these exams, before and during them, I was coughing veryfrequently. Also, I feel as though I have been affected socially. AfterGCSE exams we all get given around 10 weeks off. I have been invited by some ofmy friends to play football but I am unable to do so because I don't feelcomfortable using public transport (I use the bus). I made use of the bus forschool and I was fairly comfortable until I started coughing every singlemorning on the way there. I started to feel nervous everyday in the build up toschool and felt socially drained when I got home. Furthermore, this led me tobeing afraid to going back the next day. The coughing problem seemed to induceanxiety on my part as people began to notice and wonder why I was clearing mythroat every few seconds. Back in November, I started to experience exaggeratedstartle responses as I became more and more socially uncomfortable in publicand at school. For instance, I might be walking down the corridor and someonemay appear out of the blue causing me to jump. I became increasinglyuncomfortable walking the short distance home from the bus stop because I havestartled due to suddenly loud noises. I think the problems stated above are quite concerning. Ihave GCSE Results Day on the 25th August and I'll become extremely nervous. Onthe 2nd September is the first day of Sixth Form. I don't want to drop out ofSixth Form and not pass any A-levels.
    • #1
    #1

    Bump
    • #2
    #2

    Thought I would rely because I have been in a similar situation. I suffer anxiety, I hadn't realised until I was rushed to hospital thinking I'd had a heart attach which was actually a panic attack.. Looking back I can see it all clearly now. One thing that REALLY stands out for me was a persistent cough in situations I perceived as stressful. Friends started noticing it. It was awful.
    Anyway one thing moved to another and I ended up with eating problems (anorexia) due to stress. The dietician spotted my problem instantly and referred me to a breathing specialist! Long story short, it turned out I had Chronic Hyperventilation syndrome! Mixed with anxiety. It was a vicious cycle, one was causing the other.
    I worked with various other exercises to correct my breathing, which helped the anxiety/stress and rest of the cycle.
    I still struggle in some situations, but I am aware of it now and can correct it instantly. I no longer have the cough, that was the first thing that went. Caused by incorrect breathing..

    Google chronic hyperventilation and there's tonnes of exercises that should help, CBT also helps. It took me about 2 years to get through it, but I also did it without medication. Unfortunately a lot of GP's think its hippy so just laugh you off. But I saw a physiotherapist that specialised in breathing for stress/anxiety and chronic fatigue (it's all related!). Buteyko for anxiety is another set that helped me too. The book has become my bible when I slip.
    Hope that helps reassure you a little, you are not alone.
    • #1
    #1

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thought I would rely because I have been in a similar situation. I suffer anxiety, I hadn't realised until I was rushed to hospital thinking I'd had a heart attach which was actually a panic attack.. Looking back I can see it all clearly now. One thing that REALLY stands out for me was a persistent cough in situations I perceived as stressful. Friends started noticing it. It was awful.
    Anyway one thing moved to another and I ended up with eating problems (anorexia) due to stress. The dietician spotted my problem instantly and referred me to a breathing specialist! Long story short, it turned out I had Chronic Hyperventilation syndrome! Mixed with anxiety. It was a vicious cycle, one was causing the other.
    I worked with various other exercises to correct my breathing, which helped the anxiety/stress and rest of the cycle.
    I still struggle in some situations, but I am aware of it now and can correct it instantly. I no longer have the cough, that was the first thing that went. Caused by incorrect breathing..

    Google chronic hyperventilation and there's tonnes of exercises that should help, CBT also helps. It took me about 2 years to get through it, but I also did it without medication. Unfortunately a lot of GP's think its hippy so just laugh you off. But I saw a physiotherapist that specialised in breathing for stress/anxiety and chronic fatigue (it's all related!). Buteyko for anxiety is another set that helped me too. The book has become my bible when I slip.
    Hope that helps reassure you a little, you are not alone.
    Thanks for your response! It's good you're feeling better. But I don't quite understand how fast breathing leads to the cough. I don't recall breathing fast during coughing episodes.
    • #2
    #2

    Chronic hyperventilation involves shallow breathing. Instead breathing fully using your "belly" your breathing just with your chest. This produces the feeling of not being able to breath, and you produce a cough to try to "clear" your airways, which aren't blocked, they're just feeling tight due to the constricted muscle because you are not relaxed. If that makes sense?
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: August 9, 2016
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.