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    Firstly economics and maths are different subjects...I have a friend who is expected to get a A at Alevel in maths but is going on to take economics...

    Economics is a degree for human geographers who like a bit more of a mathmatical challenge...

    and for the psycholgy argument...its a waste of time...theres to many people taking it for you to get a job and employers dont take it seriously enough as a degree if you want to try another type of undergrad job...

    and the only way to get a job from it is to go into medicine first...yes that means 9years of university....have fun...


    im sorry about my spelling....
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    I always figured that a mickey mouse degree is simply one that you don't have to work very hard to achieve.

    For example, I got the train to college with someone that was taking golf studies and he really defended this subject. I kepted asking him what the hell is the point in doing a subject like that at College where all you do is play golf all day (he admitted that was pretty much it), and he kept saying that he could enter tournments and get paid a lot of money for it.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    You could; but it's a bit different learning a hobby to learning something to degree level lol! :p:
    Yes, you are getting thousands of pounds in debt.
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    (Original post by nanananabatman)
    Who'd be stupid enough to get a degree just for the sake of it? £3,070 a year isn't cheap, you know?
    But if there are no career prospects after it, that's exactly what's being done. Like surf studies? It's just paying to do your hobby. Is the amount of debt going to be worth it in the long run? It's doubtful.
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    How do you know you'll have a job after uni? How does ANYONE know they'll get a job after uni?
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    (Original post by nanananabatman)
    How do you know you'll have a job after uni? How does ANYONE know they'll get a job after uni?
    Exactly, no degree subject means you'll automatically get a good job with lots of prospects and have a good life. Also there are other factors other than the subject, like where you study that'll affect your employability.
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    (Original post by lea164)
    Exactly, no degree subject means you'll automatically get a good job with lots of prospects and have a good life. Also there are other factors other than the subject, like where you study that'll affect your employability.
    And experiences/stuff you do outside of studying for the degree.
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    (Original post by nanananabatman)
    How do you know you'll have a job after uni? How does ANYONE know they'll get a job after uni?
    Well nothing in ANY circumstance is 'certain', but you seem to be clutching at straws here. For a degree such as medicine, law, maths etc, your prospects of employment are very good, but for degrees such as 'surf studies', or 'golf course management' the employment and earning potential are undeniably lower, at least for the majority. When did it become that there has to be a degree for everything? It just seems pointless.
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    (Original post by nanananabatman)
    How do you know you'll have a job after uni? How does ANYONE know they'll get a job after uni?
    If I complete my degree there will be jobs waiting for me. If the worse came to the worst, then I could get onto a PGCE without a problem. Anyway the issue is the probablity of getting a graduate level job, not the probablity of just getting a job.
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    (Original post by Foobso)
    Well nothing in ANY circumstance is 'certain', but you seem to be clutching at straws here. For a degree such as medicine, law, maths etc, your prospects of employment are very good, but for degrees such as 'surf studies', or 'golf course management' the employment and earning potential are undeniably lower, at least for the majority. When did it become that there has to be a degree for everything? It just seems pointless.
    Would depend if you wanted to run a golf-course really.
    When did it become that earning loads was the only important thing in education?
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    (Original post by mooseface)
    It would depend entirely on what I wanted to do after uni.
    But I'd hope that you'd be discounting Law because you wanted to go into Films or something like that rather than making a beeline for Film Studies because you think it would benefit you. In most cases it wouldn't.
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    (Original post by Gareth-Lee Smith)
    But I'd hope that you'd be discounting Law because you wanted to go into Films or something like that rather than making a beeline for Film Studies because you think it would benefit you. In most cases it wouldn't.

    This, I agree with.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Would depend if you wanted to run a golf-course really.
    When did it become that earning loads was the only important thing in education?
    I'm sure people managed to run golf courses before this degree existed.

    And surely you'd also want to earn enough to cover the pointless debt you'd just got yourself in. If, as you say, education is not all about 'earning', then why go to uni at all? There are other ways of learning without the debt.
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    (Original post by Foobso)
    Well nothing in ANY circumstance is 'certain', but you seem to be clutching at straws here. For a degree such as medicine, law, maths etc, your prospects of employment are very good, but for degrees such as 'surf studies', or 'golf course management' the employment and earning potential are undeniably lower, at least for the majority. When did it become that there has to be a degree for everything? It just seems pointless.
    Even with medicine there is unemployability. I read an article the other day about people that had studied medicine yet still can't get a graduate job within that area. Also when did earning potential determine whether a degree is worth studying, people that study golf course management may pursue a career which they really enjoy but might not pay loads. I agree that there does seem to be a degree subject for everything these days but where there is demand for a subject the university will supply it and that doesn't mean that the subject should be seen as less challenging than traditional subjects.
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    (Original post by Foobso)
    And surely you'd also want to earn enough to cover the pointless debt you'd just got yourself in. If, as you say, education is not all about 'earning', then why go to uni at all? There are other ways of learning without the debt.
    I go to uni because it gives me the education I need to get the job I want. Nope, I'm not bothered about the earnings I get at the end. In fact, I'll need to work for little/no pay for a long time once I graduate, but I'll be enjoying it, which is far more important.
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    (Original post by lea164)
    Even with medicine there is unemployability. I read an article the other day about people that had studied medicine yet still can't get a graduate job within that area. Also when did earning potential determine whether a degree is worth studying, people that study golf course management may pursue a career which they really enjoy but might not pay loads. I agree that there does seem to be a degree subject for everything these days but where there is demand for a subject the university will supply it and that doesn't mean that the subject should be seen as less challenging than traditional subjects.
    Other than the fact that it obviously is? You just can't compare medicine with surf studies, for example.
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    (Original post by Foobso)
    Other than the fact that it obviously is? You just can't compare medicine with surf studies, for example.
    But how can you compare ANY subject? They are all different. The point is that its all at degree level, so anyone studying at degree knows their own individual subject to the same level.
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    (Original post by NW8_SW1_EC3)
    Land Economy at Cambridge..
    Wrong.

    Land Economy has one of the highest post-graduation employment rates out of any department at Cambridge.

    How learning about Films/Media can be comparable to 3 years studying Land and Public Law and Economics is beyond me. Land Economy will provide you with a much greater set of skills that are useful in the outside world than a straight forward Economics degree (which are ten-a-penny these days) will do - hence the reason why LE students are all snapped up quickly by employers.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    I go to uni because it gives me the education I need to get the job I want. Nope, I'm not bothered about the earnings I get at the end. In fact, I'll need to work for little/no pay for a long time once I graduate, but I'll be enjoying it, which is far more important.
    That's good that you're not bothered about earnings then. I wonder if the people that do these 'micky mouse degrees' will feel that way in twenty years time. My point really, was that so many people are being pressured into uni now, that many people are just opting for these easy degrees. I'm sure that's not the case for everyone, but for the others, is it really worth it?
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    (Original post by S a n d h u)
    I really wasn't expecting that, lol.
    hehe, i think that subconciously i was using that link to represent my opinion of micky mouse degrees - still just as valid as any other, they let people focus on the things they are actually interested in

    for the record, i do comp sci
 
 
 
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