The Student Room Group

Top universities ‘will turn away more UK students’

"Elite universities will turn away increasing numbers of UK students over the next few years in favour of more lucrative international applicants, experts and vice chancellors are warning."

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2023/jul/29/top-universities-will-turn-away-more-uk-students-as-fees-fail-to-match-costs

Worrying article ...
Pretty much back to the position the funding system was set up as pre-2012 then (and the position Scottish universities have been in the entire time)
(edited 10 months ago)
Reply 2
Its not exactly new.
Why are so many courses in Clearing only open to International fee paying applicants.
Its being going on for years. Its what happens if you turn education into a commodity.
Reply 3
Original post by Muttley79
"Elite universities will turn away increasing numbers of UK students over the next few years in favour of more lucrative international applicants, experts and vice chancellors are warning."

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2023/jul/29/top-universities-will-turn-away-more-uk-students-as-fees-fail-to-match-costs

Worrying article ...

It was inevitable. Education has been seen as a lucrative venture for some time now and the administrators have slowly evolved to fat cats looking for a payout.

The funding system needs to be overhauled.

Here are my controversial suggestions (no offence):
1. Increasing student repayment threshold to 10% per annum
2. Reduce student repayment salary threshold to £0. You start repaying after your studies.
3. Restrict ‘mickey mouse’ courses that lack value
4. Invest more in apprenticeships and training routes.
5. Cap salaries of administrators
6. Return maintenance grants for key courses such as nursing etc.
Reply 4
Original post by Wired_1800

5. Cap salaries of administrators

Does that include everyone who sits in an office chair earning less than a till-operator in Tesco's?
Well, not that worrying for me as an international student, as it's easier for me to get into the top universities.
However the tuition fees for international student will keep going up, and it's partially why I ultimately decided not to reapply to manchester/kcl etc. after screwing up my a levels in 2022 (was predicted A* and A grades somehow, i guess they thought of 2021 boundaries when they did so).

And if it continues it'll be significantly easier for me to get into decent/top phd/master if I graduate with a BSc in 2026. RG + 4 unis are the strong ones although newcastle is mid rg, cardiff/liverpool/qub is low rg.

A very good development for getting into phd for me direct into bachelors, although the fees may get a lot more expensive. That's partially why i decided to skip a year (and for some time, even thought 2).
Reply 6
Original post by McGinger
Does that include everyone who sits in an office chair earning less than a till-operator in Tesco's?

Not admin staff in that sense but University Administrators like Vice-Chancellors, Pro-Chancellors and the top level members. Some unis have VCs earning eye-watering amounts.
Always easy to spot people who don’t work in HE in these threads.

“I bet all those all those admin bods are paid lucratively!”

I barely earn enough to get over the student loan repayment threshold, and I’m midway up the grading ladder!
Reply 8
Honestly, unsurprising.

The most logical decision is to give a place to applicants that give the most money, rather than on talent and ability. It's a shame it has come to this, but I want to make a point more controversially than Wired, it is partially the students fault.

All those protests over the tuition fee increase to 9000 led to extreme worry from the government to increase it any further. Ironically enough, if the tuition fee loan was £20,000 a year, students don't even pay it off anyway. Students aren't even paying off the current £9250 a year loan, never mind if it was increased. Most of the students that would be affected are those with vastly high-paying jobs. In that case, why do most students care if the tuition fee loan is increased when the majority of students affected are those with the richest jobs. Yet, those with the richest job can afford the additional tuition fees. So, raising the tuition fee cap will affect the minority of students since most students don't pay it back anyway.

One interesting caveat, I discovered an article that stated that part-time tuition fees has been at £6750 since at least 2012. Interestingly enough, the Open University has had to make a lot of cuts to their modules over the years, and introduce a lot less topics in their modules. They have made their modules 30/60 credits instead of 15; they cut content from their modules to save money, etc. For example, M208 had geometry cut from the module due to rising costs and they were unable to add it back in. Recently, the Open University said that they were struggling to open up new courses/add content because of costs relating to the courses. That's the reason why the OU does not offer advanced and complex topics in their third year. It is specifically because costs are too high relative to their income they get from students.

So, now I'm wondering whether the whole tuition fee situation needs to be rectified. Universities are struggling to meet costs and are having to cut corners and reduce the quality of the course. Tuition fees must be raised in the future if we are to maintain the same quality of courses we have today.
(edited 10 months ago)
As ever. This is the inevitable result of the policies of the coalition and tory governments since 2010.

Register to vote and then vote and talk to your parents and grandparents so that they stop voting for this shower of incompetents too :smile:
Original post by Baleroc
Honestly, unsurprising.

The most logical decision is to give a place to applicants that give the most money, rather than on talent and ability. It's a shame it has come to this, but I want to make a point more controversially than Wired, it is partially the students fault.

All those protests over the tuition fee increase to 9000 led to extreme worry from the government to increase it any further. Ironically enough, if the tuition fee loan was £20,000 a year, students don't even pay it off anyway. Students aren't even paying off the current £9250 a year loan, never mind if it was increased. Most of the students that would be affected are those with vastly high-paying jobs. In that case, why do most students care if the tuition fee loan is increased when the majority of students affected are those with the richest jobs. Yet, those with the richest job can afford the additional tuition fees. So, raising the tuition fee cap will affect the minority of students since most students don't pay it back anyway.

One interesting caveat, I discovered an article that stated that part-time tuition fees has been at £6750 since at least 2012. Interestingly enough, the Open University has had to make a lot of cuts to their modules over the years, and introduce a lot less topics in their modules. They have made their modules 30/60 credits instead of 15; they cut content from their modules to save money, etc. For example, M208 had geometry cut from the module due to rising costs and they were unable to add it back in. Recently, the Open University said that they were struggling to open up new courses/add content because of costs relating to the courses. That's the reason why the OU does not offer advanced and complex topics in their third year. It is specifically because costs are too high relative to their income they get from students.

So, now I'm wondering whether the whole tuition fee situation needs to be rectified. Universities are struggling to meet costs and are having to cut corners and reduce the quality of the course. Tuition fees must be raised in the future if we are to maintain the same quality of courses we have today.

Increasing the tuition fees could slowly move to the American model where students are unbelievably burdened by student loans that they are stuck in a rot.

To me, the focus should be on students repaying back the loans that they took in the first place rather than putting further burden on wealthy people.

If you choose to study a mickey mouse degree and end up working in a job that you dont like, that’s your problem. You need to repay your loans.
(edited 10 months ago)

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