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What percentage of the UK population has a degree? watch

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    I wonder, what percentage of the UK population has a degree, or only have high school degree ?

    Are there any statistics about that ?
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    (Original post by ProgrammerC)
    I wonder, what percentage of the UK population has a degree, or only have high school degree ?

    Are there any statistics about that ?
    There's a fair bit of info here: https://www.theguardian.com/higher-e...-data-analysis
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    (Original post by shadowdweller)
    There's a fair bit of info here: https://www.theguardian.com/higher-e...-data-analysis
    "the ONS also produced a report of some of the key facts in December 2012, which found that 27.2% of the population aged 16 to 74 had a degree or equivalent or higher – about 12 million people all told. "
    That's quite low. :O

    "The recent Skills and Employment Survey found that 26% of jobs in the economy explicitly require a degree – or, put another way, if you don't go to university, more than a quarter of jobs are inaccessible to you."

    "Most people don't go to university and current data suggests that most people in the UK never will."
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    (Original post by hannxm)
    "the ONS also produced a report of some of the key facts in December 2012, which found that 27.2% of the population aged 16 to 74 had a degree or equivalent or higher – about 12 million people all told. "
    That's quite low. :O

    "The recent Skills and Employment Survey found that 26% of jobs in the economy explicitly require a degree – or, put another way, if you don't go to university, more than a quarter of jobs are inaccessible to you."

    "Most people don't go to university and current data suggests that most people in the UK never will."
    That is surprisingly low - though I'd be interested to see it broken down by demographic :holmes:
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    (Original post by hannxm)
    "the ONS also produced a report of some of the key facts in December 2012, which found that 27.2% of the population aged 16 to 74 had a degree or equivalent or higher – about 12 million people all told. "
    That's quite low. :O
    That isn't low. What kind of numbers were you expecting? 50%, like Blair dreamed of?

    "The recent Skills and Employment Survey found that 26% of jobs in the economy explicitly require a degree – or, put another way, if you don't go to university, more than a quarter of jobs are inaccessible to you."
    So more people go to University than there are jobs requiring degrees.

    Edit: "requiring" degrees. Like jobs which "require" 2:1s, despite the grading of degrees being almost worthless, most of them are probably lazy employers who can't be bothered to check out applicants with alternative education/experience.
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    (Original post by hannxm)
    "the ONS also produced a report of some of the key facts in December 2012, which found that 27.2% of the population aged 16 to 74 had a degree or equivalent or higher – about 12 million people all told. "
    That's quite low. :O

    "The recent Skills and Employment Survey found that 26% of jobs in the economy explicitly require a degree – or, put another way, if you don't go to university, more than a quarter of jobs are inaccessible to you."

    "Most people don't go to university and current data suggests that most people in the UK never will."
    I would actually like to see this broken down into the percentage of people who were 18 in 1992 up until know who have a degree as this was when polytechnics became universities and everyone was encouraged to apply.

    I reckon the percentages would be around 40% if you only looked at those between 18-40.

    I can see why those who are 40 or above might have less degrees as university was less accessible during their generation than it is now.
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    As they pointed out in the article, it almost feels like everyone goes to university. You see it all the time online and you always know of at least one person going off to university so I think it's natural to assume that a lot of people in the UK go onto higher education. I guess I expected about 35-40% but I would've been inclined to initially believe the 50% suggestion they made.

    (Original post by AngeryPenguin)
    That isn't low. What kind of numbers were you expecting? 50%, like Blair dreamed of?



    So more people go to University than there are jobs requiring degrees.
    I thought it ironic that everyone's getting degrees to basically get into that quarter of jobs - not enough for everyone!
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    (Original post by hannxm)
    "the ONS also produced a report of some of the key facts in December 2012, which found that 27.2% of the population aged 16 to 74 had a degree or equivalent or higher – about 12 million people all told. "
    That's quite low. :O

    "The recent Skills and Employment Survey found that 26% of jobs in the economy explicitly require a degree – or, put another way, if you don't go to university, more than a quarter of jobs are inaccessible to you."

    "Most people don't go to university and current data suggests that most people in the UK never will."
    Why do we wanted so many people to have a degrees I got a degree and never used it. I meet taxi drivers, cleaners, teaching assistants ext and unemployed people who have a degree.
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    (Original post by AngeryPenguin)
    most of them are probably lazy employers who can't be bothered to check out applicants with alternative education/experience.
    I take it you have never gone through applications then? A degree does count for a lot, especially in professional professions. It shows that you can form a basic sentence and express yourself using basic English, something that sadly, many school leavers today are unable to do.

    But more to the point - our economy is knowledge based. We are no longer a nation of men who hammered rivets into pieces of steel, dug coal out of the ground with a pick or carried cargo off a ship by hand for a living - there are machines for that. We do however need engineers and highly skilled and trained people to add value to our society.
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    Did I say I wanted everyone to have a degree? Because I'm pretty sure I didn't. I just thought more people had degrees.

    (Original post by looloo2134)
    Why do we wanted so many people to have a degrees I got a degree and never used it. I meet taxi drivers, cleaners, teaching assistants ext and unemployed people who have a degree.
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    If you wonder about percentage of degree holders by Britain places, there is a good article about that:

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/dat...stituency-data
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    The end of free university education turned the sector into a commercial venture, now courses are sold to customers and financial survival is the name of the game. Many of them are not materially worthy but it is for the customer to decide whether to buy one or not. It is not an entitlement anymore.
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    (Original post by looloo2134)
    Why do we wanted so many people to have a degrees I got a degree and never used it. I meet taxi drivers, cleaners, teaching assistants ext and unemployed people who have a degree.
    A cynical person like myself would say having so many people in university helps keep youth unemployment figures down.
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    (Original post by looloo2134)
    Why do we wanted so many people to have a degrees I got a degree and never used it. I meet taxi drivers, cleaners, teaching assistants ext and unemployed people who have a degree.
    1) a degree in what and 2) from which university? If their degree is from London Met then I'm not surprised
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    (Original post by Bosnia)
    1) a degree in what and 2) from which university? If their degree is from London Met then I'm not surprised
    One of people I know who unemployable graduate 2.1 from University of Cambridge 5 years ago. He never been able to keep a job more than two weeks. His degree was in English Literature I believe.
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    (Original post by iodo345)
    I would actually like to see this broken down into the percentage of people who were 18 in 1992 up until know who have a degree as this was when polytechnics became universities and everyone was encouraged to apply.
    What qualifications do you think people who went to polytechnics obtained?
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    What qualifications do you think people who went to polytechnics obtained?
    At a guess, I'd say the more vocationally-based ones since polytechnics used to focus on that if I remember correctly.
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    (Original post by CastCuraga)
    At a guess, I'd say the more vocationally-based ones since polytechnics used to focus on that if I remember correctly.
    The poster to whom I replied seemed to be under the belief that the number of degrees suddenly changed when polytechnics became universities. There is no step change at that point. However a widely published table only includes university degrees (and not the centrally validated CNAA degrees which is what polys awarded) and so there is a break of series when CNAA was abolished and each ex-Poly started awarding its own degrees.


    The Polys were less vocational than you might think. The largest philosophy department in the country used to be at Middlesex Poly.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    The poster to whom I replied seemed to be under the belief that the number of degrees suddenly changed when polytechnics became universities. There is no step change at that point. However a widely published table only includes university degrees (and not the centrally validated CNAA degrees which is what polys awarded) and so there is a break of series when CNAA was abolished and each ex-Poly started awarding its own degrees.


    The Polys were less vocational than you might think. The largest philosophy department in the country used to be at Middlesex Poly.
    I see, I must admit I had been under the same misconceptions. The colleges I have grown up seeing all focus on things such as plumbing, electricity and so on; I think I must've imagined these are what former polytechnics used to be like. It surprises me a polytechnic used to be so large in something like philosophy.
 
 
 
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