Which university should I replace for Mechanical Engineering in UK?

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ApexGhost
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Here is my current list of universities that I am applying for through UCAS:
- University of Leeds
- University of Bath
- University of Birmingham
- University of Southampton
- University of Nottingham

If I were to replace any of these universities with University of Bristol, which one should it be and why?

Additional Info: I got 4 As in IALs for Bio, Chem, Maths and Physics. No A* sadly due to low predicted results which were given by the exam board themselves since I am a private student, but there's nothing I can do and hopefully the universities will understand.
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McGinger
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Do not drop either Bath or Southampton.

And yes, Bristol is an excellent Uni for Mech Eng and worth applying to.
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ApexGhost
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(Original post by McGinger)
Do not drop either Bath or Southampton.

And yes, Bristol is an excellent Uni for Mech Eng and worth applying to.
Thank you so much for the reply! I will be sending in my application 15 hours from now so hopefully I will be able to receive more suggestions and/or advice by then.
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mnot
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(Original post by ApexGhost)
Thank you so much for the reply! I will be sending in my application 15 hours from now so hopefully I will be able to receive more suggestions and/or advice by then.
Whatever you like really. All very respected engineering schools.
I don't think their is a noticeable difference prospects wise between any of them.

Would you prefer to live in the midlands or the South? Is cost of living important? University size? campus/city matter to you? nightlife of interest?

Is their a particular area or field of mechanical engineering that interests you specifically?
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Helloworld_95
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I think you could come up with a reason to drop any of them, although I'm struggling for Leeds.

Pretty much all of those unis have strong reputations for engineering so there's not much to differentiate on there.

Bath and Southampton are relatively smaller locales, although Bath has stellar travel links which allow you to go to Bristol very easily. If you like that aspect then you wouldn't want to replace them with Bristol because that would reduce your choice for smaller cities. Bath is very good at getting people onto years in industry so if that's a priority for you then I would keep Bath. Typically people would only choose one of Bath and Bristol because of the combination of their similarities and differences so that could be another argument for dropping Bath. Southampton can oversell themselves sometimes so dropping them is an option if you want to be more cautious.

Birmingham has less of an engineering pedigree. A lot of people don't like the city, but the same can be said for Bristol. Assuming you're an international student, Birmingham has by far the best travel links both internationally and to the rest of the UK.

Nottingham is a bit out of the way, but also quite a bit cheaper than Bristol/Bath/Southampton. Travel links within the UK are on a similar par to Birmingham.

I'd say maybe don't drop Leeds because it's reasonably priced, very good travel links, and you have the ability to switch degrees after second year which could be a bonus.
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ApexGhost
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(Original post by mnot)
Whatever you like really. All very respected engineering schools.
I don't think their is a noticeable difference prospects wise between any of them.

Would you prefer to live in the midlands or the South? Is cost of living important? University size? campus/city matter to you? nightlife of interest?

Is their a particular area or field of mechanical engineering that interests you specifically?
Astronautics is what I am mainly interested. More specifically, Propulsion systems.
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mnot
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(Original post by ApexGhost)
Astronautics is what I am mainly interested. More specifically, Propulsion systems.
Propulsion systems is pretty much thermodynamics, so this is something you would get in any mechanical engineering undergrad. But to look at the more detailed concepts of the propulsion systems probably wont happen till masters level. Realistically any would be fine.

Given you also have the astronautics interest (which would probably require a specialist masters to cover realistically) im inclined to say it doesnt make a great deal of difference which uni you choose but id probably sub out Birmingham just because I know Notts, Bristol, Southampton all work in the areas mentioned and I know Leeds & Bath both do automotive propulsion.
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by ApexGhost)
Astronautics is what I am mainly interested. More specifically, Propulsion systems.
If you're interested in astronautics then why wouldn't you apply to aerospace? That's probably the one area where aero grads do have a significant advantage over mech. The unis which excel at space are Surrey, Sheffield, Southampton, and Strathclyde.

I would also bear in mind that UK jobs in rocket propulsion are non-existent outside of Reaction Engines.
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ApexGhost
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
If you're interested in astronautics then why wouldn't you apply to aerospace? That's probably the one area where aero grads do have a significant advantage over mech. The unis which excel at space are Surrey, Sheffield, Southampton, and Strathclyde.

I would also bear in mind that UK jobs in rocket propulsion are non-existent outside of Reaction Engines.
I am only going to the UK for my degree and after that I am going to work in the EU or Australia and possibly come back just for a MSc degree. Aerospace degrees seem to be all over the place and I prefer to be specialized at something rather than being mediocre at a lot of things and good at nothing, if you get what I mean or atleast that's how I view degrees such as aerospace and mechatronics. I would rather get a degree in mechanical engineering and then a degree in electrical engineering later down the line and a masters degree after knowing what I really want.
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ApexGhost
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(Original post by mnot)
Propulsion systems is pretty much thermodynamics, so this is something you would get in any mechanical engineering undergrad. But to look at the more detailed concepts of the propulsion systems probably wont happen till masters level. Realistically any would be fine.

Given you also have the astronautics interest (which would probably require a specialist masters to cover realistically) im inclined to say it doesnt make a great deal of difference which uni you choose but id probably sub out Birmingham just because I know Notts, Bristol, Southampton all work in the areas mentioned and I know Leeds & Bath both do automotive propulsion.
Thank you, I have replaced University of Birmingham with Bristol University. And yes I am definitely going for a masters degree later on. Only reason I didn't go for MEng is because I heard MSc is more well-respected.
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by ApexGhost)
I am only going to the UK for my degree and after that I am going to work in the EU or Australia and possibly come back just for a MSc degree. Aerospace degrees seem to be all over the place and I prefer to be specialized at something rather than being mediocre at a lot of things and good at nothing, if you get what I mean or atleast that's how I view degrees such as aerospace and mechatronics. I would rather get a degree in mechanical engineering and then a degree in electrical engineering later down the line and a masters degree after knowing what I really want.
What you've described is an argument for aerospace rather than for mechanical, aero and mechatronics are by definition more specialised. Do you have permission to work in the EU or Australia? Both of those are getting more and more difficult to get work visas for.

Also MEng and MSc are equally respected.
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ApexGhost
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
What you've described is an argument for aerospace rather than for mechanical, aero and mechatronics are by definition more specialised. Do you have permission to work in the EU or Australia? Both of those are getting more and more difficult to get work visas for.

Also MEng and MSc are equally respected.
I understand what you mean but isn't mechanical engineering more in-depth when it comes to machines and mechanical related stuffs compared to Aerospace Engineering? Whereas Aerospace Engineering is like trying to be a mechanical engineer, electrical engineer and programmer all at the same time while being mediocre at all 3 of them?

I will definitely work as an astronautical engineer in the future and the only other I am interested in are robotics (for aiding in space exploration) as well as Fusion energy (to power spacecrafts). I will worry about getting work visa after I am almost done with uni xD

Are you sure that MEng and MSc are equally respected? Everywhere I read online contradicts that.
My teacher still hasn't handed over his reference to UCAS so I still haven't applied and I am open to suggestions.
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by ApexGhost)
I understand what you mean but isn't mechanical engineering more in-depth when it comes to machines and mechanical related stuffs compared to Aerospace Engineering? Whereas Aerospace Engineering is like trying to be a mechanical engineer, electrical engineer and programmer all at the same time while being mediocre at all 3 of them?

I will definitely work as an astronautical engineer in the future and the only other I am interested in are robotics (for aiding in space exploration) as well as Fusion energy (to power spacecrafts). I will worry about getting work visa after I am almost done with uni xD

Are you sure that MEng and MSc are equally respected? Everywhere I read online contradicts that.
My teacher still hasn't handed over his reference to UCAS so I still haven't applied and I am open to suggestions.
No, both are similarly in depth. I can count the number of aerospace courses which are like you describe on one hand, the large majority are 95% mechanical with an aerospace specialism and then 5% electrical.

If you're interested in robotics and fusion energy then mechanical engineering is not what you want to go into. Computer Science or EEE would be much more suitable.

Yes, they are definitely equally respected. I've applied to plenty of places across the world with an MEng and had no problems. Some little companies in countries which send very few students to the UK don't like MEng, but they are not the companies you will be aiming to work at.
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ApexGhost
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
No, both are similarly in depth. I can count the number of aerospace courses which are like you describe on one hand, the large majority are 95% mechanical with an aerospace specialism and then 5% electrical.

If you're interested in robotics and fusion energy then mechanical engineering is not what you want to go into. Computer Science or EEE would be much more suitable.

Yes, they are definitely equally respected. I've applied to plenty of places across the world with an MEng and had no problems. Some little companies in countries which send very few students to the UK don't like MEng, but they are not the companies you will be aiming to work at.
Aerospace engineering was my initial choice but then I got kinda lost between Aerospace, Electrical and Mechanical and decided to go with Mechanical Engineering in the end as I mainly love working with machines and see electronics as a way to just control machines more precisely. But if what you say is true... then I am kinda lost again. I'm glad my teacher is late at sending his reference. I need more input actually.

Currently I know how to program well in python as well as make basic electronics using Arduino such as solar array that tracks the strongest light source. I really enjoy programming as well as working with electronics but also love machines.... this is hard to choose. Will I be able to change my major after the first year if I do change my mind?
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mnot
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(Original post by ApexGhost)
Currently I know how to program well in python as well as make basic electronics using Arduino such as solar array that tracks the strongest light source. I really enjoy programming as well as working with electronics but also love machines.... this is hard to choose. Will I be able to change my major after the first year if I do change my mind?
You dont really do programming in mechanical.
More likely to use matlab or computational engineering tools (like CFD & FEA).
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by ApexGhost)
Aerospace engineering was my initial choice but then I got kinda lost between Aerospace, Electrical and Mechanical and decided to go with Mechanical Engineering in the end as I mainly love working with machines and see electronics as a way to just control machines more precisely. But if what you say is true... then I am kinda lost again. I'm glad my teacher is late at sending his reference. I need more input actually.

Currently I know how to program well in python as well as make basic electronics using Arduino such as solar array that tracks the strongest light source. I really enjoy programming as well as working with electronics but also love machines.... this is hard to choose. Will I be able to change my major after the first year if I do change my mind?
In the machines you've talked about, the electrical and programming parts are more important than the mechanical part e.g. in Robotics it's the actuators and programming which are what makes them function, and in fusion it's all about the magnets.

You wouldn't be able to change from mechanical engineering 1st year to say EEE 2nd year, you would need to start EEE 1st year again. For Leeds you can switch from Mechanical to Aerospace after 2nd year but I don't think that's really where your interests lie. I would be looking at EEE, preferably at a university which either allows you to do some mechatronics as part of it or has a good set of EEE related extracurricular opportunities (Surrey is probably best for this).

I would advise that you choose 5 unis to apply to by the time you need to and apply to them, because you should still be able to change subjects later and that will give you more time to think about it. (I changed twice between applying and actually starting at uni, once in December, the second time just before results day)
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ApexGhost
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
In the machines you've talked about, the electrical and programming parts are more important than the mechanical part e.g. in Robotics it's the actuators and programming which are what makes them function, and in fusion it's all about the magnets.

You wouldn't be able to change from mechanical engineering 1st year to say EEE 2nd year, you would need to start EEE 1st year again. For Leeds you can switch from Mechanical to Aerospace after 2nd year but I don't think that's really where your interests lie. I would be looking at EEE, preferably at a university which either allows you to do some mechatronics as part of it or has a good set of EEE related extracurricular opportunities (Surrey is probably best for this).

I would advise that you choose 5 unis to apply to by the time you need to and apply to them, because you should still be able to change subjects later and that will give you more time to think about it. (I changed twice between applying and actually starting at uni, once in December, the second time just before results day)
Thank you for your patience and input. I think I will start a new thread. I'm really torn between ME and EE after thinking hard about all the things I have done in my life.
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