KarunK4
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Hey all. I am a Year 12 student interested in doing Maths and Economics at LSE. I have done some research (primarily from older TSR threads) and have been fairly discouraged from previous student feedback. Is such feedback still relevant today? I am a fairly average guy who likes Mathemetics (and Economics), and while I am definitely a huge procrastinator for essays and things in my AS level subjects, I often spend hours at a time doing Maths because I find it so damn interesting. I will probably end up with something like AA*A* or maybe even triple A*. I am used to a "competitive" environment as I go to a well known grammar school, but my school is full of great, calm people so I do have (somewhat) a social life. I do like to have a social life and am concerned about complaints I have seen previously.

Such complaints include:

- Cutthroat environment, borderline toxic. Competing for internships.
- Not much of a uni community, the only thing that is representative of a community is people flexing the status of LSE
- E.g. no events like balls, only emails about mental health that don't really do much.
- Hardly a campus, you need to go out in London to have the uni experience.
- Very expensive (same as all London Unis)
- Inconsistent quality of teaching. Most work is therefore independent and fairly unguided.
- Quite hard to initially make friends because of international students already knowing each other. But at the same time everyone knows the “LSE hard to make friends thing” so people actually overcompensate so it’s not as hard as it used to be
- Quite left wing?
- Most people know the downsides of LSE and most people think they can suck it up. But not everyone can.

Are such complaints relevant today?
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Johnny ~
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(Original post by KarunK4)
Hey all. I am a Year 12 student interested in doing Maths and Economics at LSE. I have done some research (primarily from older TSR threads) and have been fairly discouraged from previous student feedback. Is such feedback still relevant today? I am a fairly average guy who likes Mathemetics (and Economics), and while I am definitely a huge procrastinator for essays and things in my AS level subjects, I often spend hours at a time doing Maths because I find it so damn interesting. I will probably end up with something like AA*A* or maybe even triple A*. I am used to a "competitive" environment as I go to a well known grammar school, but my school is full of great, calm people so I do have (somewhat) a social life. I do like to have a social life and am concerned about complaints I have seen previously.

Such complaints include:

- Cutthroat environment, borderline toxic. Competing for internships.
- Not much of a uni community, the only thing that is representative of a community is people flexing the status of LSE
- E.g. no events like balls, only emails about mental health that don't really do much.
- Hardly a campus, you need to go out in London to have the uni experience.
- Very expensive (same as all London Unis)
- Inconsistent quality of teaching. Most work is therefore independent and fairly unguided.
- Quite hard to initially make friends because of international students already knowing each other. But at the same time everyone knows the “LSE hard to make friends thing” so people actually overcompensate so it’s not as hard as it used to be
- Quite left wing?
- Most people know the downsides of LSE and most people think they can suck it up. But not everyone can.

Are such complaints relevant today?
Most of these sound like stereotypes. A couple contradict each other, which is always a bad sign.

- Depends on the course and the time of the year and your friend group. Wasn't toxic for me and I was applying for jobs from day 1
- I'd say that community is found at the level of societies and halls of accommodation. There is fairly little community at university level. (Query: how can a bunch of strangers relate by 'flexing a name'?)
- Not true. LSE's close to a lot of pretty amazing nightlife. Not uncommon for people to walk to Zoo, Ministry, etc. This is actually more true for campus unis and unis in smaller towns, where the closest decent nightlife is a bus or train ride away.
- Yes, London's expensive. There are living costs calculators online.
- I guess, though varies by course. Look at the breakdown of course-wide satisfaction data on Discovering Uni. Also look at the module-by-module breakdown's on LSE's website
- Most people will know one or two people who are starting at their uni. I don't think that internationals are more or less likely to know each other. Few schools place more than a handful of students each year into LSE
- It's pretty easy to make friends through Fresher's, societies, etc. Just make sure you pick a sociable hall and go to the various events its social's committee organised. We had at least one a week for the first few weeks of first year
- How can it be both corporate and left wing? The LSE = left wing rep i a remnant of the 1960s. I'd say that LSE is probably very neoliberal as a whole. You obviously get a sizeable leftist crowd but also a sizeable right-wing and culturally conservative base. Don't forget that a large % of the intake is from more conservative countries. LSE is probably more diverse when it comes to politics than many other unis of a similar calibre, especially ones like St.A's or Durham
- There's not much to suck up, honestly. Make friends, avoid teachers with bad teaching reps, join societies, etc. Make an effort to be on campus in second and third year and arrange 'study dates' with people who don't live near you in London.

I'd say that the main issues with LSE are the lack of a campus environment (for those who want one), lack of 'communal' events (like uni-wide sporting fixtures, balls, etc.), and the large % of international students in some courses. The lack of a campus environment is mitigated to a degree as the campus does have popular 'meeting spots' (outside of NAB, outside of library, fourth floor of library, pubs) where it's very easy to bump into people and chat. But some people do want the peace and quiet and structure of a proper uni campus, which is very fair. I'd probably go for a campus uni if I was doing uni a second time round.

Cost of living, hassle of commuting, etc. are really no different to any other uni in London. Commuting in particular is very common for unis that are located in big cities and unis in the middle of nowhere like Warwick.
Last edited by Johnny ~; 4 months ago
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JOSH4598
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There is one YouTuber who I recently came across who is a first year at LSE. She does lots of great videos on all aspects of LSE and student-living in London.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2n...tslVcUC0M7ifxg
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VigoWilliam
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What you mentioned are mostly stereotypes. They are not wrong, but that's not too much to worry about.

1. Yes your colleagues will be competing for internships, but it's your choice to join them or just have fun.
2. Again, it's true it lacks community due to small size, but you can go up to Bloomsbury to join the UoL community, which is large and vibrant.
3. There are balls. One or two each term. I know that's not many, but other universities don't have too many either.
4. Actually the campus is nice (though not really a campus). I would say it looks much better than the KCL campus across the road (which only has a bunch of ugly 70s industrial buildings if you exclude the Bush House). The new Centre Building is one of the coolest among central London universities.
5. It's expensive. we can't question that...
6. To be honest, contact time of most British universities are the same. You need to go to American LACs to get education that's dedicated to teaching. In LSE, at least you know your teacher are really qualified in their subjects.
7. Same as 3, I recommend you to visit Bloomsbury for friends. It's only 15 mins walk and you can use all the faculties.
8. Uh... I don't really know any major universities that's not "left-wing" (more liberal). Maybe Exeter is the only one?
9. Even if the downsides you mention are downsides, you only need to spend a few years there in exchange for an excellent education, let alone they are not really downsides. It's hard to feel happy if you choose a random party university and then struggle to decent jobs.

Ultimately it depends on your other choices, but I would argue there are very few choices to turn down LSE.
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KarunK4
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(Original post by Johnny ~)
Most of these sound like stereotypes. A couple contradict each other, which is always a bad sign.

- Depends on the course and the time of the year and your friend group. Wasn't toxic for me and I was applying for jobs from day 1
- I'd say that community is found at the level of societies and halls of accommodation. There is fairly little community at university level. (Query: how can a bunch of strangers relate by 'flexing a name'?)
- Not true. LSE's close to a lot of pretty amazing nightlife. Not uncommon for people to walk to Zoo, Ministry, etc. This is actually more true for campus unis and unis in smaller towns, where the closest decent nightlife is a bus or train ride away.
- Yes, London's expensive. There are living costs calculators online.
- I guess, though varies by course. Look at the breakdown of course-wide satisfaction data on Discovering Uni. Also look at the module-by-module breakdown's on LSE's website
- Most people will know one or two people who are starting at their uni. I don't think that internationals are more or less likely to know each other. Few schools place more than a handful of students each year into LSE
- It's pretty easy to make friends through Fresher's, societies, etc. Just make sure you pick a sociable hall and go to the various events its social's committee organised. We had at least one a week for the first few weeks of first year
- How can it be both corporate and left wing? The LSE = left wing rep i a remnant of the 1960s. I'd say that LSE is probably very neoliberal as a whole. You obviously get a sizeable leftist crowd but also a sizeable right-wing and culturally conservative base. Don't forget that a large % of the intake is from more conservative countries. LSE is probably more diverse when it comes to politics than many other unis of a similar calibre, especially ones like St.A's or Durham
- There's not much to suck up, honestly. Make friends, avoid teachers with bad teaching reps, join societies, etc. Make an effort to be on campus in second and third year and arrange 'study dates' with people who don't live near you in London.

I'd say that the main issues with LSE are the lack of a campus environment (for those who want one), lack of 'communal' events (like uni-wide sporting fixtures, balls, etc.), and the large % of international students in some courses. The lack of a campus environment is mitigated to a degree as the campus does have popular 'meeting spots' (outside of NAB, outside of library, fourth floor of library, pubs) where it's very easy to bump into people and chat. But some people do want the peace and quiet and structure of a proper uni campus, which is very fair. I'd probably go for a campus uni if I was doing uni a second time round.

Cost of living, hassle of commuting, etc. are really no different to any other uni in London. Commuting in particular is very common for unis that are located in big cities and unis in the middle of nowhere like Warwick.
Thank you for your detailed response! Has definitely reassured me. Most of the information I saw was fairly doom and gloom so it’s nice to have a more positive outlook
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Anonymous #1
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If you search for LSE Marshal building, that’s a new addition to the LSE campus from 2021, and would be the biggest building for students starting this year, providing sports facilities etc.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
If you search for LSE Marshal building, that’s a new addition to the LSE campus from 2021, and would be the biggest building for students starting this year, providing sports facilities etc.
There’s a video about this on lse website

https://info.lse.ac.uk/staff/divisio...shall-building
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Anonymous #2
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Almost all unis are left-wing. You’ll find it hard to fit in if you’re going to make an issue of it
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