Claude Thant
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#1
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#1
Hi guys,

I want to learn some medical knowledge as I need it for my business. Since am not going to be a doctor, medicine isn't for me, so is Biochemistry or Biomedical Science more suited for me? I have been looking at the course modules as well.
But any opinion is welcomed.

Thanks in advance
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Queenbee4571
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#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by Claude Thant)
Hi guys,

I want to learn some medical knowledge as I need it for my business. Since am not going to be a doctor, medicine isn't for me, so is Biochemistry or Biomedical Science more suited for me? I have been looking at the course modules as well.
But any opinion is welcomed.

Thanks in advance
Hi, I studied Biochemistry BSc from Queen Mary University of London and graduated back in 2018 (2:1). I can give a few tips about both types of courses as I had friends in Biomedical Science.

Biochemistry is super hard in final year but it's not an impossible course to do. It just needs a lot of memorising different mechanisms and enzymes, reactions in the body. There is a mixture of pharmaceutical science and chemistry as well. I did pharmaceutical chemistry module in my second year. But like every second year, it got pretty intense. Pharamaceutical chemistry you could say was the easiest module, as per other's opinions lol.

In my first year I had to study with some students who were doing biomedical science (people take this if they want to study medicine later on or if they want to work in a lab). You can do lab work with biochemistry as well, but to do well in the course you need to be really good in organic chemistry lol. You can also choose do all biology modules (one of my friends did this in second year as she failed her organic chemistry exam in first year). Organic chemistry was super hard, but if you work hard and get your mechanisms (drawing arrows to represent reactions) right you pretty much got it. Just put your head down and practise (kind of like when you did your math homework in school).

I heard people dropped out of biomedical science in their second years or somewhat through their first year as they no longer wanted to continue studying the course. I haven't heard anyone from my cohort dropping out. Then again it could just be the university course design.

In my first year I did basic biology chemistry modules, in second year it got more specific (we spent more time working with biology students than biomedical), final year we were all pretty much just biochemistry. There was a module on pharmacology as well which my friend did but she said it was a new module and they were very lucky to pass the exam as there were no past papers lol.

In my final year I had the option to do a research project or (two of my friends did this) paper research based project (using research papers to write dissertation). I was an idiot and took the research project. Out of 4 biochem undergrads who chose the same professor, I got the short straw and got the longest and most time consuming project. Anyways, thankfully I passed with a 2:1.

Overall, sorry for the long thread reply but Biochemistry was always my passion, but it was a lot of work. However, I don't think it was as bad as the things I was hearing in biomedical. My friend who studied biomedical science got a 2:1 and went off to study being a dr. in Belgium. They are both very hard courses, but so worth it after you finish.

I hope I didn't put you off, but definitely do your research. Make good friends who will help you pass, and make links with years above you. I had a lot of senior students who helped me get through my degree.
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Claude Thant
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Queenbee4571)
Hi, I studied Biochemistry BSc from Queen Mary University of London and graduated back in 2018 (2:1). I can give a few tips about both types of courses as I had friends in Biomedical Science.

Biochemistry is super hard in final year but it's not an impossible course to do. It just needs a lot of memorising different mechanisms and enzymes, reactions in the body. There is a mixture of pharmaceutical science and chemistry as well. I did pharmaceutical chemistry module in my second year. But like every second year, it got pretty intense. Pharamaceutical chemistry you could say was the easiest module, as per other's opinions lol.

In my first year I had to study with some students who were doing biomedical science (people take this if they want to study medicine later on or if they want to work in a lab). You can do lab work with biochemistry as well, but to do well in the course you need to be really good in organic chemistry lol. You can also choose do all biology modules (one of my friends did this in second year as she failed her organic chemistry exam in first year). Organic chemistry was super hard, but if you work hard and get your mechanisms (drawing arrows to represent reactions) right you pretty much got it. Just put your head down and practise (kind of like when you did your math homework in school).

I heard people dropped out of biomedical science in their second years or somewhat through their first year as they no longer wanted to continue studying the course. I haven't heard anyone from my cohort dropping out. Then again it could just be the university course design.

In my first year I did basic biology chemistry modules, in second year it got more specific (we spent more time working with biology students than biomedical), final year we were all pretty much just biochemistry. There was a module on pharmacology as well which my friend did but she said it was a new module and they were very lucky to pass the exam as there were no past papers lol.

In my final year I had the option to do a research project or (two of my friends did this) paper research based project (using research papers to write dissertation). I was an idiot and took the research project. Out of 4 biochem undergrads who chose the same professor, I got the short straw and got the longest and most time consuming project. Anyways, thankfully I passed with a 2:1.

Overall, sorry for the long thread reply but Biochemistry was always my passion, but it was a lot of work. However, I don't think it was as bad as the things I was hearing in biomedical. My friend who studied biomedical science got a 2:1 and went off to study being a dr. in Belgium. They are both very hard courses, but so worth it after you finish.

I hope I didn't put you off, but definitely do your research. Make good friends who will help you pass, and make links with years above you. I had a lot of senior students who helped me get through my degree.
Yes, I also heard that it is very difficult, that's why I thought of just studying Management in University. But now I am starting to change my mind because I always have studied STEM subjects & it feels like if I don't take a Biology-related course, I would learn nothing more than what I have learned during my A-levels. Eventually, I will have to do business but it's still related to health care industry as we sell products such as medical equipment, devices and etc. I will be taking a joint degree or courses with business modules. I have been looking at the modules as well.

As you have finished a Biochemistry degree yourself, do you think it has something to do with healthcare ? -Like diseases & diagnosis. Sorry I am not quite sure how to put my thoughts into words, sorry. Thanks for your time.
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Queenbee4571
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Claude Thant)
Yes, I also heard that it is very difficult, that's why I thought of just studying Management in University. But now I am starting to change my mind because I always have studied STEM subjects & it feels like if I don't take a Biology-related course, I would learn nothing more than what I have learned during my A-levels. Eventually, I will have to do business but it's still related to health care industry as we sell products such as medical equipment, devices and etc. I will be taking a joint degree or courses with business modules. I have been looking at the modules as well.

As you have finished a Biochemistry degree yourself, do you think it has something to do with healthcare ? -Like diseases & diagnosis. Sorry I am not quite sure how to put my thoughts into words, sorry. Thanks for your time.
No problem at all, sorry for the late reply.

There are several modules where we were introduced to diseases, symptoms and methods of treatment. The ones I can remember are cancer and other illnesses that are not so well known but are interesting to know about. I cannot remember off the top of my head but there is a disease where people cannot go into sunlight because of the lack of a protein in their skin. They need to wear a special suit sometimes they are nicknamed "moon people" because of it.

However, it would not be as in depth as biomedical science.

Hope this helped somewhat
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EmilyClarke24
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Claude Thant)
Hi guys,

I want to learn some medical knowledge as I need it for my business. Since am not going to be a doctor, medicine isn't for me, so is Biochemistry or Biomedical Science more suited for me? I have been looking at the course modules as well.
But any opinion is welcomed.

Thanks in advance
Hi,

I am a current 3rd year natural sciences student at the University of Nottingham.
I was in a similar situation when I was deciding what course to do as I loved medical type stuff but didn't want to be a doctor.

I decided on a natural sciences degree as it allowed me to be a bit more flexible than other science degrees.
I took Biology, Chemistry and Psychology in 1st year and have continued with Biology and Psychology in 2nd and 3rd year. I have taken most modules that fit with neurobiology and disease.
New to the course at Nottingham is also cancer science so that is an option to study alongside Biology.
There are modules such as Genome and human disease, neurobiology of disease, genes molecules and cells and cancer biology to name a few which are quite medically orientated.

I have left a link below to the course if it sounds like something you might be interested in.
https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/naturalsciences/

If you have any questions just let me know,
Emily
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Claude Thant
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#6
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#6
Hello guys, thank you for your replies. I submitted my UCAS application a few days ago. I found that Medical Science suits my interest best, although 2 of my choices are Biomedical Science (insurance). I hope you are all having a lovely day.
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