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Undergraduate degree decision

Hello,

I am a year 12 student taking Biology, Chemistry and Psychology at A-level and my predicted grades are A*,A, A. I don’t believe I have the drive or passion to do a medicine degree, however I am quite interested in forensic pathology but have kind of accepted I won’t be getting to this role without a medicine degree.

I am considering dentistry however don’t feel it’s quite the role for me. I like the idea of diagnosis and resolution and not sure what working in a lab environment would be like. I also really enjoy microscope work.

I’m really unsure what route to take with my life, my go to answer for people asking about my future is Biochemistry but in all honestly I don’t know much about what the degree entails and how could I get work experience for this? Is biomedicine a better choice?


please help
Reply 1
My daughter had exactly the same dilemma - quite attracted to forensic pathology but knew she didn't want to do medicine. Looked at biochem which was a possibility but she wasn't super excited about it.
In the end, she found Biomedical Sciences ticked more boxes than any other course, particularly as the first year is very broad then you can specialise in whatever you are most interested in. As she was on a gap year, she applied with her actual grades - like you, A*AA - Oxford, Imperial, KCL, UCL and Bath. Had to take the BMAT exam though so need to look at that too, but well worth exploring for you.
Reply 2
Original post by cora06140
My daughter had exactly the same dilemma - quite attracted to forensic pathology but knew she didn't want to do medicine. Looked at biochem which was a possibility but she wasn't super excited about it.
In the end, she found Biomedical Sciences ticked more boxes than any other course, particularly as the first year is very broad then you can specialise in whatever you are most interested in. As she was on a gap year, she applied with her actual grades - like you, A*AA - Oxford, Imperial, KCL, UCL and Bath. Had to take the BMAT exam though so need to look at that too, but well worth exploring for you.


This was so reassuring to hear! I’m really glad your Daughter found the right course for her and I hope it is all going well for her :smile:

I’m definitely in the same situation trying to pick between biochemistry and biomedicine, was the anything in particular, especially with the content of the courses, that made her go for biomedicine? Also I’m not too familiar with the BMAT so when does that have to be taken? Sorry I have so many questions, but also how was the application for Oxford as it is something I am considering.

Thanks again for all your help
Reply 3
I'm a biomedical science student at the university of Manchester. I had the same issue! I 100% recommend Biomedical sciences rather than biochemistry, the main reason being flexibility. I'm literally taking biochemistry as a course unit rn, and can transfer to biochem or any other subject (the transfer process is easy if that's what you're worried about!). I'm taking subjects related to pharmacology, neuroscience, genetics, biodiversity etc. If you are still hesitant by the time you're supposed to submit your application I'd definitely say biomed is the best choice.
Reply 4
Hi there,

It sounds like you're at a bit of a crossroads in your life, and you're not sure what path to take. I can understand how that can be tough.

First of all, let me say that your grades are amazing! You're clearly very bright and capable, and you have a lot of options available to you.

It sounds like you're interested in forensic pathology, but you're not sure if you have the drive or passion to do a medicine degree. That's understandable. Medicine is a long and challenging path, and it's not for everyone.

If you're not sure if medicine is the right path for you, there are a few other options that you might want to consider. One option is to do a biochemistry degree. Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes that occur in living organisms. It's a fascinating field of study, and it can lead to a variety of different careers, including forensic pathology.

Another option that you might want to consider is a biomedicine degree. Biomedicine is a cross-disciplinary field that combines biology, medicine, and engineering. It's a relatively new field, but it's growing rapidly, and it offers a lot of opportunities for those who are interested in a career in healthcare.

So, how can you get work experience in these fields? One way is to volunteer at a local hospital or clinic. This will give you the opportunity to see firsthand what it's like to work in a healthcare setting. You can also shadow a doctor or other healthcare professional. This will give you a better understanding of what their job entails.

Another great way to get work experience is to do an internship. Internships are a great way to gain real-world experience in a particular field. There are many different internships available, so you're sure to find one that's a good fit for you.

Finally, don't forget to talk to your teachers, counselors, and other trusted adults. They can offer you guidance and support as you make your decision about what to do with your life.

Good luck with your decision!
Original post by freddie89
Hello,

I am a year 12 student taking Biology, Chemistry and Psychology at A-level and my predicted grades are A*,A, A. I don’t believe I have the drive or passion to do a medicine degree, however I am quite interested in forensic pathology but have kind of accepted I won’t be getting to this role without a medicine degree.

I am considering dentistry however don’t feel it’s quite the role for me. I like the idea of diagnosis and resolution and not sure what working in a lab environment would be like. I also really enjoy microscope work.

I’m really unsure what route to take with my life, my go to answer for people asking about my future is Biochemistry but in all honestly I don’t know much about what the degree entails and how could I get work experience for this? Is biomedicine a better choice?


please help


Hello,

I am currently a 3rd year Biomedical Science student and thought I could shed some light from my experience!
Biomedical Science is all about understanding human processes and how these lay the foundations for understanding and investigating health, disease, treatment, and prevention. Although a portion of it is lab based, it's incredibly transferrable as I've done modules on data analysis, biochemistry and forensics to name a few. I've found through my degree that I don't want to work in a lab, therefore I'm doing a masters in Data Science and Analytics and thankfully I was able to get onto because of my degree. Biomedical Science is extremely broad however if you are looking to choose it, make sure the university your considering has an IBMS accreditation!
Hope this helps :smile:
Reply 6
Original post by UniOfLincolnStudent
Hello,

Biomedical Science is extremely broad however if you are looking to choose it, make sure the university your considering has an IBMS accreditation!
Hope this helps :smile:


None of the top unis offering Biomed have IBMS accreditation though?
Hey,

Swansea University offers Biochemistry, Biomedical Science (Clinical Biochemistry), and Applied Medical Sciences, which all sound like they could be right up your street. Definitely check out the hyperlinks! All of the website pages linked include all the entry requirements needed, UCAS courses, how you would be taught (coursework vs exams vs both), Welsh Provision, Professional Body Accreditations and so much more. They should contain all the information you would need to know.

I personally studied Applied Medical Sciences, as I feel like this covers more medically applied biochemistry/biomedical science content, and that really suited me. You cover topics such as anatomy and physiology (with prosected specimens and a full anatomy lab complete with models and other study resources to help your learning), biochemistry, ethics, pharmacology and so much more.

The other good thing about Applied Medical Sciences is that it acts as a pathways degree to Graduate Entry Medicine, which could be an option for you if you do decide that you want to do Medicine later down the line.

I hope that helps!

Let us know if you have any questions.

Hope Henry - Swansea Student Ambassador - Second Year Graduate Entry Medicine.

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