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evaluate the evidence linking smoking with lung cancer
Does this link help at all? I think that's what you were looking for.
Original post by hornygirlxxx
evaluate the evidence linking smoking with lung cancer


There is a significant amount of evidence linking smoking with lung cancer. This evidence comes from several different sources, including epidemiological studies, laboratory experiments, and clinical observations.

Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that smokers are at a much higher risk of developing lung cancer than non-smokers. For example, the British Doctors Study, which followed 34,439 male British doctors over a 50-year period, found that the death rate from lung cancer was over 20 times higher among smokers than non-smokers. Other studies have found similar results.

Laboratory experiments have also provided strong evidence linking smoking with lung cancer. For example, animal studies have shown that exposure to cigarette smoke can cause lung tumors. In addition, laboratory studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke contains a number of carcinogens, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrosamines, which can damage DNA and lead to the development of cancer.

Clinical observations have also provided evidence linking smoking with lung cancer. For example, lung cancer patients who quit smoking have been shown to have better outcomes than those who continue to smoke. In addition, lung cancer patients who have never smoked have been found to have a different pattern of genetic mutations than those who have smoked, providing further evidence of the link between smoking and lung cancer.

Overall, the evidence linking smoking with lung cancer is compelling and robust. While other factors, such as genetics and environmental exposures, may also play a role in the development of lung cancer, smoking is by far the most important risk factor. Therefore, efforts to reduce smoking rates and promote smoking cessation are critical for reducing the incidence of lung cancer.
Reply 3
Original post by Reality Check
Does this link help at all? I think that's what you were looking for.


wow well done smart guy
Reply 4
thanks so much

Original post by Curious_Bilawi
There is a significant amount of evidence linking smoking with lung cancer. This evidence comes from several different sources, including epidemiological studies, laboratory experiments, and clinical observations.

Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that smokers are at a much higher risk of developing lung cancer than non-smokers. For example, the British Doctors Study, which followed 34,439 male British doctors over a 50-year period, found that the death rate from lung cancer was over 20 times higher among smokers than non-smokers. Other studies have found similar results.

Laboratory experiments have also provided strong evidence linking smoking with lung cancer. For example, animal studies have shown that exposure to cigarette smoke can cause lung tumors. In addition, laboratory studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke contains a number of carcinogens, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrosamines, which can damage DNA and lead to the development of cancer.

Clinical observations have also provided evidence linking smoking with lung cancer. For example, lung cancer patients who quit smoking have been shown to have better outcomes than those who continue to smoke. In addition, lung cancer patients who have never smoked have been found to have a different pattern of genetic mutations than those who have smoked, providing further evidence of the link between smoking and lung cancer.

Overall, the evidence linking smoking with lung cancer is compelling and robust. While other factors, such as genetics and environmental exposures, may also play a role in the development of lung cancer, smoking is by far the most important risk factor. Therefore, efforts to reduce smoking rates and promote smoking cessation are critical for reducing the incidence of lung cancer.

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