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Should I take economics

These are my Grades

Maths 8
Physics 8
Biology 7
Chemistry 7
French 7
English 7
English 8
History 7
Business 5

My current a levels are maths, further maths, physics and economics. Is this a good combo and what are my university and career options?
(edited 8 months ago)
Original post by Kingdragon
These are my Grades

Maths 8
Physics 8
Biology 7
Chemistry 7
French 7
English 7
English 8
History 7
Business 5

My current a levels are maths, further maths, physics and economics. Is this a good combo and what are my university and career options?

Is this a good combo?
If you're doing maths (or even further maths), you should be more than OK with economics.

The subjects do complement each other, especially if you like logic, analysis, and problem solving.

what are my university and career options?
This is something you should have done prior to picking your A Levels.

Degree options where you have the required subjects (maths and physics) mentioned:

All economics degrees

Computer science and software engineering

Maths

Physics

Most of engineering, except for bioengineering and

Geology

A number of life science/healthcare degrees where they ask for 2 sciences (see: https://www.mathscareers.org.uk/degree-courses-a-level-mathematics/)

Data science and data analytics

Finance, financial mathematics, financial engineering, and actuarial science



You can then do degrees that ask for 3 A Levels in any subject, including:

Anything in business expect for financial mathematics and actuarial science (for obvious reasons)

Law

Anthropology

Archaeology

Sociology and criminology

Most psychology degrees

Some degrees in creative writing and English literature

Nonquantiative economics degrees

Education

Theology

Politics

Philosophy

Linguistics

Agriculture

Some art and design degrees, including architecture

Some geography degrees

Film

Game design

Hospitality

Property and urban planning

Journalism

Media studies

Nursing

Paramedic science

Social work


Further maths is a semi-required/strongly preferred subject if it's available and is often requested at top end unis. Economics is not really required, but is preferred at a handful of unis for economics (maths is still predominantly the required subject for many).

In terms of careers, the random careers that you would be eligible for with no further training post A Levels include:

Administration

Government services

Social work

Some areas of healthcare

Most areas of business (HR, marketing, accounting, sales)

IT roles

Some areas of construction

Most areas of property

Most areas of beauty and wellbeing

Creative/design and media (if you're good)

Theatre and film (if you're good)

Music (if you're good)

Anything related to writing (if you're good)

Storage

Logisitics

Armed forces and police force (if you pass certain tests, have a clean record, and are of a certain age range)

Some environmental services

Hospitality

Manufacturing

Management (if you have the relevant experience)

Retail

Care work

Travel and tourism

Charity

Entertainment (if you're good)

Translation (if you are fluent in more than one language)


If you decide to go back to college (adult college), then you can do courses that are relevant to the following:

Animal care (other than vet)

Some areas of construction and certain trades

Some areas of beauty and wellbeing

Some areas of engineering


You can go into the following areas with specific professional qualifications (irrespective of what previous qualifications you have):

Accounting

Actuary (if you have a math background e.g. A Level Maths)

Law (SQE; if you want to be a barrister, you would need an LLB in the first place or a PGDL after your undergrad)

Most areas of finance

Delivery and transport (licences)

Sports coaching



Should you do an appropriate degree, you can go into the following areas:

Healthcare (apprenticeships available in some roles)

Engineering (although you can go in via apprenticeships)

Architecture (apprenticeships available)

Economics (apprenticeships available)

Research (apprenticeships available)

Teaching (apprenticeships available)

Law (apprenticeships available for some roles)



The areas where you would have problems getting into include specific roles in healthcare where you can't find a way into the role without doing a degree e.g. dentistry.

I don't know what sort of careers that you're interested in and I am not going to go through 800+ roles in one response. If you can be significantly more specific about what you're looking for, then I might be able to help point you in the right direction. Otherwise, look through the following yourself:
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/explore-careers
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/education/job-profiles
Reply 2
The thing is what should I do about my 5 in business?
(edited 8 months ago)
Original post by Kingdragon
The thing is what should I do about my 5 in business?


What about it?
It's a pass, albeit not a particularly good pass.

If you're applying for top end uni that looks at your GCSE results, it might be a minor hindrance unless you can confirm top A Level grades. Otherwise, it's not that big of a deal. Most unis consider your A Level grades a lot more than your GCSEs.
If this is a particular concern and you do end up getting rejected from a top end uni, I would firstly confirm what grades you would get at the end of your A Levels, then reapply during your gap year. Chances are though, a number of unis shouldn't have a problem with your applications if you get A*/As in your A Levels, considering you are also doing 3 difficult STEM subjects as well as economics.

If you're concerned about whether your business GCSE grade is reflective of how things would turn out in economics at A Level, then I can say it's definitely not going to be a good indicator. A Levels are very different to GCSEs, so they're not very good indicators to begin with (you can score 9s at GCSE, but can end up with Cs at A Level if you use the wrong approach). Second, economics and business are distinct subjects (even though a lot of people argue there is a lot of overlap), so there's not that much correlation between the 2.
Reply 4
Original post by MindMax2000
What about it?
It's a pass, albeit not a particularly good pass.

If you're applying for top end uni that looks at your GCSE results, it might be a minor hindrance unless you can confirm top A Level grades. Otherwise, it's not that big of a deal. Most unis consider your A Level grades a lot more than your GCSEs.
If this is a particular concern and you do end up getting rejected from a top end uni, I would firstly confirm what grades you would get at the end of your A Levels, then reapply during your gap year. Chances are though, a number of unis shouldn't have a problem with your applications if you get A*/As in your A Levels, considering you are also doing 3 difficult STEM subjects as well as economics.

If you're concerned about whether your business GCSE grade is reflective of how things would turn out in economics at A Level, then I can say it's definitely not going to be a good indicator. A Levels are very different to GCSEs, so they're not very good indicators to begin with (you can score 9s at GCSE, but can end up with Cs at A Level if you use the wrong approach). Second, economics and business are distinct subjects (even though a lot of people argue there is a lot of overlap), so there's not that much correlation between the 2.


I was predicted an 8 so will universities see that I just did not preform well in the exam. Also it is not too bad right?
Original post by Kingdragon
I was predicted an 8 so will universities see that I just did not preform well in the exam. Also it is not too bad right?

I was predicted an 8 so will universities see that I just did not preform well in the exam
Although I don't have access or know specifically what the universities see, I think it's prudent to assume that they would only see/consider the final grades. Whatever predictions you got for GCSEs are irrelevant, even if they can see them. The only predicted grades that I can firmly say unis would be concerned with are your A Level predicted grades if you are applying in Year 13; after Year 13, it's mostly about achieving the actual grades prior to enrolling.

it is not too bad right?
Well, I wouldn't say a 5 is a stellar grade, but it's not a detriment or would affect you long term nor is it something that you necessarily need to go back and rectify.
I think the better way to think about it is whether you have learned the lessons you need to learn about the result. What can you take away with you after getting a 5? Why do you think you got a 5 instead of the 8? Can you implement strategies to deter from getting a lower grade than one you're well capable of getting?
Reply 6
I think the problem was in business GCSe I would always approach the economic aspect, rather than the business aspect. For example in 12 marker I would score 5/12, and my business teacher would say I focused too much on the economic side. Also, the raw mark was 102/180. Given that the paper was out of 90, there would be a 9 marker, 9 marker and 12 marker (30% of the grade).
Original post by Kingdragon
I think the problem was in business GCSe I would always approach the economic aspect, rather than the business aspect. For example in 12 marker I would score 5/12, and my business teacher would say I focused too much on the economic side. Also, the raw mark was 102/180. Given that the paper was out of 90, there would be a 9 marker, 9 marker and 12 marker (30% of the grade).


You could always request a copy of your test paper for a fee from your exam board should you need to. The important thing is that you have learned the lessons you need to learn to move on from it.

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