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Investment Banking

What is the best way to secure a job as an investment banker at a top firm such as J.P Morgan, Goldman Sachs, ect? I'm just finishing my A levels this year. Is the best route uni, degree apprenticeships, something else?? Any specific uni's you recommend? Thanks in advance for the answer!
(edited 12 months ago)
Hi, I've moved your thread to the finance, investment banking and accountancy forum.

I don't think there are any apprenticeships (degree or otherwise) in the actual investment banking part of major banks. edit: apparently GS has one.

Your only real option is uni, and to go to a target uni for investment banks (which are pretty much the ones you think they are). However they don't really care what subject you study for the general analyst roles I gather so if your personal passion is learning about vikings and reading Beowulf, you can just as well do a degree in ASNAC or Viking and Old Norse Studies and go into investment banking as someone who did economics.

If you wanted to do quant finance though then you'd realistically probably need to be aiming for a PhD in maths, CS, or maybe physics or engineering after doing a similar undergrad, most likely all at a target uni.
(edited 6 months ago)
Reply 2
Original post by artful_lounger
Hi, I've moved your thread to the finance, investment banking and accountancy forum.

I don't think there are any apprenticeships (degree or otherwise) in the actual investment banking part of major banks.

Your only real option is uni, and to go to a target uni for investment banks (which are pretty much the ones you think they are). However they don't really care what subject you study for the general analyst roles I gather so if your personal passion is learning about vikings and reading Beowulf, you can just as well do a degree in ASNAC or Viking and Old Norse Studies and go into investment banking as someone who did economics.

If you wanted to do quant finance though then you'd realistically probably need to be aiming for a PhD in maths, CS, or maybe physics or engineering after doing a similar undergrad, most likely all at a target uni.


I really know nothing about UK universities. Could you possibly suggest a (target uni)? as their is so much disagreement and i want to know from a credible source. My a level results are not good enough for Cambridge, oxford but are for UCL, would that be a good uni?
Original post by dnielslfj
I really know nothing about UK universities. Could you possibly suggest a (target uni)? as their is so much disagreement and i want to know from a credible source. My a level results are not good enough for Cambridge, oxford but are for UCL, would that be a good uni?

The target unis are pretty widely considered to include Oxford, Cambridge, UCL, Imperial, LSE, and Warwick (perhaps only specific departments there e.g. maths, the business school, economics, CS). Others may or may not be included by some peoples' reckoning but those are fairly safe bets I would expect.

I'd also note that plenty of UCL (and LSE) courses have the same or sometimes higher entry criteria than Oxford or Cambridge do in general. The standard offer for Oxford "arts" subjects is AAA typically - plenty of UCL courses are above that. If you are below that then with AAB or lower there are far fewer courses at UCL (or LSE) that you would be able to consider.

Also even if the entry criteria are lower in terms of grades, that doesn't mean the course will be any easier to get into. There are a number of courses at LSE with a given entry requirement of e.g. AAA or A*AA which have very low success rates for applicants (even lower than equivalent subjects at Oxford or Cambridge - for example law at LSE is usually statistically more competitive than either Oxford or Cambridge).

Worth bearing in mind quite a few investment banking grad schemes require AAB (and you will just get sifted out if you don't have that for those ones).
Reply 4
Original post by artful_lounger
The target unis are pretty widely considered to include Oxford, Cambridge, UCL, Imperial, LSE, and Warwick (perhaps only specific departments there e.g. maths, the business school, economics, CS). Others may or may not be included by some peoples' reckoning but those are fairly safe bets I would expect.

I'd also note that plenty of UCL (and LSE) courses have the same or sometimes higher entry criteria than Oxford or Cambridge do in general. The standard offer for Oxford "arts" subjects is AAA typically - plenty of UCL courses are above that. If you are below that then with AAB or lower there are far fewer courses at UCL (or LSE) that you would be able to consider.

Also even if the entry criteria are lower in terms of grades, that doesn't mean the course will be any easier to get into. There are a number of courses at LSE with a given entry requirement of e.g. AAA or A*AA which have very low success rates for applicants (even lower than equivalent subjects at Oxford or Cambridge - for example law at LSE is usually statistically more competitive than either Oxford or Cambridge).

Worth bearing in mind quite a few investment banking grad schemes require AAB (and you will just get sifted out if you don't have that for those ones).

hey,

I want to get into investment banking and I’m trying to pick between Edinburgh and Strathclyde for my university next year. Both courses are pretty similar (economics and finance) and I am struggling to pick between the two. I prefer the location of Strathclyde and the student life there however the prestige of Edinburgh and it being a Russell Group university is tempting me there. I have heard investment banks tend to only pick graduates from feeder universities or Russell Group unis; is there truth to this and if my chances of entry into the sector significantly change between the two universities? Do you know anything of the employability coming out of either
(edited 10 months ago)
Original post by MR.DS
hey,

I want to get into investment banking and I’m trying to pick between Edinburgh and Strathclyde for my university next year. Both courses are pretty similar (economics and finance) and I am struggling to pick between the two. I prefer the location of Strathclyde and the student life there however the prestige of Edinburgh and it being a Russell Group university is tempting me there. I have heard investment banks tend to only pick graduates from feeder universities or Russell Group unis; is there truth to this and if my chances of entry into the sector significantly change between the two universities? Do you know anything of the employability coming out of either

They do filter for those who attended target universities I gather. The RG has no bearing on this and there are lots of RG unis that are not target unis.

I don't know if Edinburgh is considered a target uni - I'd suspect it's probably semi target at best. Doubt Strathclyde is either.

Note this only applies to this specific area of investment banking and also management consulting. For the vast majority of grad schemes, including other roles in financial services (e.g. accountancy including big 4, actuarial work, etc) they don't really care much where you graduated and the important thing is your work experience and ability to perform in psychometric assessments and assessment centre activities.

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