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Chemistry Research, Durham University
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edinburgh or durham

should i go to edinburgh or durham uni to study maths?? i want good career prospects and i want to be around people who like genuinely care about doing well!!!
i've been allocated st johns college for durham
also i am english will i be excluded at edinburgh
i need A*A*A for both

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Reply 1
Original post by 哪壶不开提哪壶
A wise man once said, ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country


huh?!?!?!
Chemistry Research, Durham University
Durham University
Durham
Visit website
Reply 2
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Reply 3
Original post by 哪壶不开提哪壶
A wise man once said, ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country


This statement of the wise man was presumably when he was having an off day?
Reply 4
Original post by sadfhjvl
should i go to edinburgh or durham uni to study maths?? i want good career prospects and i want to be around people who like genuinely care about doing well!!!
i've been allocated st johns college for durham
also i am english will i be excluded at edinburgh
i need A*A*A for both


Edinburgh. Easy choice.
Reply 5
Original post by Quady
Edinburgh. Easy choice.


why?
What city do you feel you would most enjoy living in for 3+ years? Choose that one. I work in a sector involving engineering, science and policy.. Speaking as somebody who regularly recruits and interviews for my employer, we look at the grade you got and not where you got it from generally, as well as how you do in your interviews.

Generally, in most industries/sectors, we have more importance on you having a STEM degree with a decent grade than the in establishment issuing it. Both are excellent universities.

We've hired people with good degrees from Swansea, Wrexham and other places and rejected people from Cambridge, Loughborough and Oxford int he past because the former impressed in interview and assessment and the latter didn't impress as much.

3+ years is a long time to spend in a city and it's important to choose somewhere you can both afford to live and enjoy living.
(edited 9 months ago)
Reply 7
Original post by sadfhjvl
why?


St John's sucks? Like that wasn't your collahe preference surely?

Also Edinburgh is a proper city. Durham is kinda tiny, just a large town.
Reply 8
Original post by Quady
St John's sucks? Like that wasn't your collahe preference surely?

Also Edinburgh is a proper city. Durham is kinda tiny, just a large town.


why does St John's suck!! It was my second choice after St Chad's. Did you go to Durham?
do you think id have better career prospects at edinburgh?
Reply 9
Original post by Grim_Squeaker
What city do you feel you would most enjoy living in for 3+ years? Choose that one. I work in a sector involving engineering, science and policy.. Speaking as somebody who regularly recruits and interviews for my employer, we look at the grade you got and not where you got it from generally, as well as how you do in your interviews.

Generally, in most industries/sectors, we have more importance on you having a STEM degree with a decent grade than the in establishment issuing it. Both are excellent universities.

We've hired people with good degrees from Swansea, Wrexham and other places and rejected people from Cambridge, Loughborough and Oxford int he past because the former impressed in interview and assessment and the latter didn't impress as much.

3+ years is a long time to spend in a city and it's important to choose somewhere you can both afford to live and enjoy living.

Thank you!
Original post by sadfhjvl
Thank you!

It's a tough time, having to choose not only what you want to do but also where you want to do it. Take your time if you need to and maybe visit both Unis, if you haven't already and get a feel for both the character of the city/town and also the campus and the people there.

I like both Edinburgh and Durham, having had friends in both. Key is, when you get there and tart your degree, to find yourself a decent social circle of friends and get into some good societies too, to help yourself grow. That will then balance against the academic commitments and you will get the best experience you can towards earnign the best grade you can achieve.

Work hard but also do enjoy your University years. Not many people get to do campus life twice and it can really create friendships and memories that last the rest of your life sometimes.
Not a hard one choose to be honest, preferred locations are key here. Although, I guess you may give a **** about a collegiate system, which to be fair is done properly at Oxford/Cambridge.
Mathematics wise there probably isn't a great deal to choose between them - modules are fairly comparable. There's a few differences you can consider, for example Edinburgh being on a semester system presumably means 2 sets of exams each year whereas Durham has all their exams at the end of the year. Either can be an advantage depending on your style of learning.
The main difference is going to be living wise though. While both are cities, Durham is rather smaller and of course the college system is different to halls. Personally I preferred Durham for this reason, but if you are used to living in London for example you may find Edinburgh more attractive as Durham seems too quiet for you!
Original post by sadfhjvl
should i go to edinburgh or durham uni to study maths?? i want good career prospects and i want to be around people who like genuinely care about doing well!!!
i've been allocated st johns college for durham
also i am english will i be excluded at edinburgh
i need A*A*A for both


Hi there

Congratulations on securing both offers! I think these three considerations will be key in your decision:

1. Size of the city- Durham is far small compared to Edinburgh. There's not much to do outside of university like college events and societies except clubs and cafes. Newcastle is just 15 mins away and many students tend to go there when they want a big-city experience. But with Edinburgh you'd have that at your doorstep.

2. College or campus-based uni- From personal experience, I would definitely recommend the collegiate system. It offers a much more localised way for you to socialise and meet your kind of people, alongside a two-tier level of support in terms of welfare, finance and more. This is something absent from a campus-based uni. With colleges, you can also get involved in extra curriculars like music, dance, theatre, sports at a smaller level than the university-wide level which is attractive if you want to do these things but not be held back by the large competitive uni teams.

3. Course content- Have a look at the course pages for both unis and see if there are any particular differences that stick out to you. This may be in the form of some modules that are super attractive or the professors who teach the course. Look at what academic support is available at both. As for Durham, you get an academic advisor throughout your time at Durham who you can approach if you face any academic or personal problems and want advice. There's also DCAD- Durham Centre for Academic Development- which exists to help you study better. For instance, they can provide assistance if you're struggling to catch up with readings or take notes effectively during lectures or write good essays. Durham's also big on wellbeing. Colleges have dedicated welfare officers who you can approach to have a chat about ANYTHING that's bothering you (personal or academic) and regular wellbeing sessions are also held including free workout sessions.

Hope that provides some insight :smile:

-Himieka
Reply 14
Original post by random_matt
Not a hard one choose to be honest, preferred locations are key here. Although, I guess you may give a **** about a collegiate system, which to be fair is done properly at Oxford/Cambridge.

so you'd go for edinburgh?? i'm not overly bothered about colleges, though it would make accommodation easier
Reply 15
Original post by Lemur14
Mathematics wise there probably isn't a great deal to choose between them - modules are fairly comparable. There's a few differences you can consider, for example Edinburgh being on a semester system presumably means 2 sets of exams each year whereas Durham has all their exams at the end of the year. Either can be an advantage depending on your style of learning.
The main difference is going to be living wise though. While both are cities, Durham is rather smaller and of course the college system is different to halls. Personally I preferred Durham for this reason, but if you are used to living in London for example you may find Edinburgh more attractive as Durham seems too quiet for you!

do you think they are both equally respected? if i did well
Original post by sadfhjvl
so you'd go for edinburgh?? i'm not overly bothered about colleges, though it would make accommodation easier


If their anthropology course contained biological aspects, sure. Unfortunately their course does not, so Durham it was.
Original post by sadfhjvl
should i go to edinburgh or durham uni to study maths?? i want good career prospects and i want to be around people who like genuinely care about doing well!!!
i've been allocated st johns college for durham
also i am english will i be excluded at edinburgh
i need A*A*A for both


I’m not sure what you mean by ‘people who like genuinely care about doing well’?
Reply 18
Original post by 5hyl33n
I’m not sure what you mean by ‘people who like genuinely care about doing well’?


like people who want to do well, not just there for 'uni'. i'm sure thats the case at both edinburgh or durham tho
Reply 19
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