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Students on campus at Queen Mary, University of London
Queen Mary, University Of London
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Non-accredited Degree

I am interested in studying Biomedical Science at QMUL, but noticed it is not accredited by the IBMS. What concerns should I have regarding this? And will there be any complications as a result?
It depends on what you plan to do after. Do you want to work in the NHS or a hospital as a biomedical scientist, or would you like do perform research or work in industry?
Students on campus at Queen Mary, University of London
Queen Mary, University Of London
London
Reply 2
Original post by sleep_supremacy
It depends on what you plan to do after. Do you want to work in the NHS or a hospital as a biomedical scientist, or would you like do perform research or work in industry?


Preferably I would want to work in the NHS or a hospital. Would this still be open if I complete my degree at QMUL?
Reply 3
Original post by Punampriyam
Preferably I would want to work in the NHS or a hospital. Would this still be open if I complete my degree at QMUL?


You can but you will be taking the longer and more expensive route. You will have to pay the IBMS to look at your transcript once you graduate and they may suggest that you do some top-up modules or (worst case) they may suggest that have to completely redo your degree.

You will also have to find an IBMS accredited lab to complete your registration portfolio in so that you can register with the HCPC. This is easier to do during a sandwich placement (between your second and third year) but if your degree is not accredited then they probably don't offer this, they may instead offer a year in industry or they might not offer any sort of sandwich placement. You could try and source one yourself but a lot of training labs are affiliated with a certain university and so it may be more difficult for you to get a placement. If you don't get a placement during university, then you will have to either take an unpaid year in a lab and complete your portfolio, try and get a paid "trainee Biomedical Scientist" job which are increasingly harder to find nowadays or you can do what a lot of people do which is get an MLA job in a lab and see if they will train you alongside your job.

Basically my advice is if you want to work in the NHS then do an IBMS accredited degree. The quickest route to registration is:
IBMS accredited degree --> sandwich placement in an IBMS accredited lab to complete your portfolio --> then after graduation you can register straight away with the HCPC and start working in the NHS as a Biomedical Scientist.

There is also the NHS Practitioner Training Programme, this is slightly newer than the regular route so I don't know as much about it but there is more information on Google about that!
(edited 5 months ago)
Reply 4
Original post by JadeN92
You can but you will be taking the longer and more expensive route. You will have to pay the IBMS to look at your transcript once you graduate and they may suggest that you do some top-up modules or (worst case) they may suggest that have to completely redo your degree.

You will also have to find an IBMS accredited lab to complete your registration portfolio in so that you can register with the HCPC. This is easier to do during a sandwich placement (between your second and third year) but if your degree is not accredited then they probably don't offer this, they may instead offer a year in industry or they might not offer any sort of sandwich placement. You could try and source one yourself but a lot of training labs are affiliated with a certain university and so it may be more difficult for you to get a placement. If you don't get a placement during university, then you will have to either take an unpaid year in a lab and complete your portfolio, try and get a paid "trainee Biomedical Scientist" job which are increasingly harder to find nowadays or you can do what a lot of people do which is get an MLA job in a lab and see if they will train you alongside your job.

Basically my advice is if you want to work in the NHS then do an IBMS accredited degree. The quickest route to registration is:
IBMS accredited degree --> sandwich placement in an IBMS accredited lab to complete your portfolio --> then after graduation you can register straight away with the HCPC and start working in the NHS as a Biomedical Scientist.

There is also the NHS Practitioner Training Programme, this is slightly newer than the regular route so I don't know as much about it but there is more information on Google about that!


So what kind of jobs would be possible without the accreditation by the IBMS? Would there be any point in the degree without actually going through the placement and top up module afterwards?
Original post by Punampriyam
So what kind of jobs would be possible without the accreditation by the IBMS? Would there be any point in the degree without actually going through the placement and top up module afterwards?

Research and industry (pharmaceutical) jobs. Whether there is any point in doing top-up modules depends on what you want to do down the line.
Original post by Punampriyam
Preferably I would want to work in the NHS or a hospital. Would this still be open if I complete my degree at QMUL?


Best to aim for an IBMS accredited course in that case. The ideal course is the Healthcare Sciences (Life Sciences) courses that are/were part of the NHS Practitioner Training Programme (PTP). A lot of these have closed in recent years as they transitioned to an apprenticeship format instead, but those courses are not only accredited by the IBMS but include placements to complete your professional portfolio to register with the HCPC upon graduation, allowing you to directly apply to Band 5 BMS roles after you graduate.

An IBMS accredited course which doesn't have these placements only gets you halfway to working as a BMS, as you still need the HCPC registration - for other courses you'd need to look at those with a sandwich year/year in industry type placement where there are possibilities of a placement in an approved NHS pathology lab (however you would need to apply to those competitively so a bit of a gamble), or you would need to work as an MLA for a few years after graduating to build your portfolio (with approval from your manager) before you can apply to BMS roles.

The apprenticeship format of the healthcare sciences courses are also worth a look, although a lot of these are now I think designed for internal NHS applicants currently working as an MLA in an NHS pathology lab.

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