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BPS unaccredited undergrad degree

hi, I have just completed a bachelors degree in psychology outside the UK and as universities in the UK don't offer accredited clinical psychology msc programs I'm unsure about what to do next. I don't want to enroll in conversion programs either. the solution to this that I can think of is what if I opt for an accredited health psychology msc from a university that does not require GBC or conversion course from international applicants and then apply for doctorate in clinical psychology following the completion of accredited health psy msc. if someone could enlighten me on this, it would be really helpful. thanks!
Original post by zee_99
hi, I have just completed a bachelors degree in psychology outside the UK and as universities in the UK don't offer accredited clinical psychology msc programs I'm unsure about what to do next. I don't want to enroll in conversion programs either. the solution to this that I can think of is what if I opt for an accredited health psychology msc from a university that does not require GBC or conversion course from international applicants and then apply for doctorate in clinical psychology following the completion of accredited health psy msc. if someone could enlighten me on this, it would be really helpful. thanks!

In the UK, Doctorates in Clinical Psychology are applied for via the "Clearing House for Postgraduate Courses in Clinical Psychology", here.

If you check the entry requirements, you will note that having GBC is mandatory. Your proposed route will therefore not work, unfortunately. Why don't you want to take a BPS-accredited conversion course (a Master's degree)? That would be the classic approach for somebody in your situation.

As you mention that you "completed a bachelors degree in psychology outside the UK", it's probably worth checking the residency requirements on that same site too.
Reply 2
Original post by DataVenia
In the UK, Doctorates in Clinical Psychology are applied for via the "Clearing House for Postgraduate Courses in Clinical Psychology", here.

If you check the entry requirements, you will note that having GBC is mandatory. Your proposed route will therefore not work, unfortunately. Why don't you want to take a BPS-accredited conversion course (a Master's degree)? That would be the classic approach for somebody in your situation.

As you mention that you "completed a bachelors degree in psychology outside the UK", it's probably worth checking the residency requirements on that same site too.


the reason I don't want to take a conversion course is because I have limited finances available for my studies and with conversion courses (following its completion) the employment opportunities will be limited. as an int student, with an accredited masters degree in a specialized field, I will have more work opportunities, allowing me to save up for my doctorate.
also, what if I change my plan from Dclinpsy to doctorate in health psychology. would the proposed route still not work? an undergrad degree granting GBC would still be required?
what if a university does not ask its international applicants for an accredited under grad degree or a conversion course for securing the admission into an accredited health psychology msc? would such students be eligible for the doctorate stage 2 training later or not in the UK? there are two to three universities in the UK that I came across which do consider qualifications without GBC and accredited conversion msc. but Im not sure whether such accredited speacialized msc programs make students eligible for doctorate later despite the BPS accreditation when students don't have GBC.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by zee_99
the reason I don't want to take a conversion course is because I have limited finances available for my studies and with conversion courses (following its completion) the employment opportunities will be limited. as an int student, with an accredited masters degree in a specialized field, I will have more work opportunities, allowing me to save up for my doctorate.
also, what if I change my plan from Dclinpsy to doctorate in health psychology. would the proposed route still not work? an undergrad degree granting GBC would still be required?
what if a university does not ask its international applicants for an accredited under grad degree or a conversion course for securing the admission into an accredited health psychology msc? would such students be eligible for the doctorate stage 2 training later or not in the UK? there are two to three universities in the UK that I came across which do consider qualifications without GBC and accredited conversion msc. but Im not sure whether such accredited speacialized msc programs make students eligible for doctorate later despite the BPS accreditation when students don't have GBC.

If you want to practice in the UK as a Health Psychologist (which is a legally protected job title, by the way) then you must be registered with the Health and Care Processions Council (HCPC), which requires that you have completed an an approved education programme. There are 13 approved programmes for Health Psychology (see here for their course search page). However, many of these are just full time vs. part time versions of the same course. If we ignore that distinction, then there are 7 distinct doctoral-level programmes.

I've just checked and they all require GBC:

(1) British Psychological Society - Qualification in Health Psychology (Stage 2) (see here) - "Enrolment (entry) requirements | Graduate Basis for Chartered membership"

(2) Glasgow Caledonian University - DPsych Health Psychology (see here): "UK honours degree 2:1 (or equivalent) in psychology that meets British Psychological Society (BPS) standards for the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC), plus relevant work experience."

(3) Liverpool John Moores University - DHealthPsych Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology (see here): "You will need: a good honours degree in Psychology and GBC | a BPS Accredited MSc in Health Psychology (or BPS Stage I Qualification)"

(4) Staffordshire University - Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology (see here): "You’ll need: An honours degree recognised by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as offering Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership"

(5) University of Stirling - Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology (see here) - "Applicants must: hold a good (2:1 or above) honours degree in psychology be a graduate member of the BPS or hold the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC)"

(6) University of Surrey - PhD in Health Psychology with Stage 2 Training (see https://www.surrey.ac.uk/postgraduate/health-psychology-phd) - "Students must also: be a graduate member of the British Psychological Society (BPS) or hold the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC)"

(7) University of the West of England, Bristol - Doctor of Health Psychology (see here): "You should have: UK honours degree at 2.1 or above (or equivalent international qualification) | Graduate Basis for Chartership with the British Psychological Society"

One route which I thought might work for you is to take 1 year MSc in Health Psychology at UWE Bristol (details here), which provides Stage 1 training to become eligible for Practical Health Psychology status. You could then follow that up with a Doctorate Health Psychology which provides Stage 2 training. However, the description on the MSc course says, "If you hold Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS), the MSc provides Stage 1 training towards Practitioner Health Psychologist status." That would tend to imply that this route doesn't work either. :frown:

Your original post said that you'd "just completed a bachelors degree in psychology outside the UK"; have you considered asking BPS grant you GBC status based upon that degree. You you look at this page, and open the "Non-UK applicants" section under "How do I apply?" you note that it says the following:

If you’re applying for a Graduate membership and gained your degree at an institution outside of the UK, then there are still options open to you. When you apply, the BPS will consider the following criteria:

* If you hold a degree from a recognised university or comparable institution
* If it is of an equivalent standard to a British bachelors degree at a minimum of lower 2nd class honours level, having also passed an empirical project
* If your degree is made up of at least 50% psychology content
* If your qualifications cover the core areas of the GBC


If you can gain GBC status, everything will become a lot simpler.
Reply 4
Thank you so so much. Very well explained. Though Why isn’t there any option to be able to gain GBC following the completion of BPS accredited Msc health psychology program in the UK? If I’m not wrong, university of Surrey is offering accredited health psychology MSc and is not even requiring GBC or any conversion courses for securing the admission. I was even planning on enrolling in this course thinking this course would make me eligible and get me GBC.

And yes I have considered getting my degree assessed directly but I don’t yet have the official transcript of my final semester results and I’m afraid I might have to cross the deadlines for the 23 intake if I continue to wait for it.
Original post by zee_99
Thank you so so much. Very well explained. Though Why isn’t there any option to be able to gain GBC following the completion of BPS accredited Msc health psychology program in the UK? If I’m not wrong, university of Surrey is offering accredited health psychology MSc and is not even requiring GBC or any conversion courses for securing the admission. I was even planning on enrolling in this course thinking this course would make me eligible and get me GBC.

And yes I have considered getting my degree assessed directly but I don’t yet have the official transcript of my final semester results and I’m afraid I might have to cross the deadlines for the 23 intake if I continue to wait for it.

I don't know why it's set-up this way. That's a question for the BPS, I suspect.

Surrey's Health Psychology MSc, here, is an interesting one in that it says "Accredited against the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS)." That's not quite the same thing as saying that is confers Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership.

If you look-up the course on the BPS site, here, it says, "This programme is accredited for all intakes from 1998/1999 and successful completion of this programme fulfils stage one of the requirements towards Chartered Membership of the Society and full membership of the Division of Health Psychology."

So it might be that this route work for you. However, before you embark on it, I'd recommend that you contact the University of Surrey and specifically ask if completion of their Health Psychology MSc would be sufficient to meet the academic entry requirements for their "PhD in Health Psychology with Stage 2 Training", because that course says "Students must also: be a graduate member of the British Psychological Society (BPS) or hold the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC)", as I mentioned above.
Reply 6
Original post by DataVenia
I don't know why it's set-up this way. That's a question for the BPS, I suspect.

Surrey's Health Psychology MSc, here, is an interesting one in that it says "Accredited against the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS)." That's not quite the same thing as saying that is confers Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership.

If you look-up the course on the BPS site, here, it says, "This programme is accredited for all intakes from 1998/1999 and successful completion of this programme fulfils stage one of the requirements towards Chartered Membership of the Society and full membership of the Division of Health Psychology."

So it might be that this route work for you. However, before you embark on it, I'd recommend that you contact the University of Surrey and specifically ask if completion of their Health Psychology MSc would be sufficient to meet the academic entry requirements for their "PhD in Health Psychology with Stage 2 Training", because that course says "Students must also: be a graduate member of the British Psychological Society (BPS) or hold the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC)", as I mentioned above.


Yes I have emailed them and I am still waiting for their response. You see this is what I was so confused about. Thank you so much again for bearing with all my questions.
Reply 7
Original post by DataVenia
I don't know why it's set-up this way. That's a question for the BPS, I suspect.

Surrey's Health Psychology MSc, here, is an interesting one in that it says "Accredited against the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS)." That's not quite the same thing as saying that is confers Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership.

If you look-up the course on the BPS site, here, it says, "This programme is accredited for all intakes from 1998/1999 and successful completion of this programme fulfils stage one of the requirements towards Chartered Membership of the Society and full membership of the Division of Health Psychology."

So it might be that this route work for you. However, before you embark on it, I'd recommend that you contact the University of Surrey and specifically ask if completion of their Health Psychology MSc would be sufficient to meet the academic entry requirements for their "PhD in Health Psychology with Stage 2 Training", because that course says "Students must also: be a graduate member of the British Psychological Society (BPS) or hold the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC)", as I mentioned above.

hello, I have got one more question. Do you think its possible if at the time of applying to the university for an accredited Health MSc course, I Don't have GBC but later I get my undergrad degree assessed for GBC (whilst I'm enrolled on the course). As I told, I don't yet have the degree and I don't want to miss the deadlines either. therefore, I will soon be making an application on the basis of previous semester results and an expected results letter for the final semester.
So, by getting GBC (on the basis of my non-UK undergrad degree) sometime later in the middle of studying the MSc course, would I be eligible to proceed Or a Conversion MSc program following the completion of specialized MSc would still be needed?
Original post by zee_99
hello, I have got one more question. Do you think its possible if at the time of applying to the university for an accredited Health MSc course, I Don't have GBC but later I get my undergrad degree assessed for GBC (whilst I'm enrolled on the course). As I told, I don't yet have the degree and I don't want to miss the deadlines either. therefore, I will soon be making an application on the basis of previous semester results and an expected results letter for the final semester.So, by getting GBC (on the basis of my non-UK undergrad degree) sometime later in the middle of studying the MSc course, would I be eligible to proceed Or a Conversion MSc program following the completion of specialized MSc would still be needed?

Kings (as an example) seem to suggest you need GBC before applying, which can take 2-3 weeks
Original post by zee_99
hello, I have got one more question. Do you think its possible if at the time of applying to the university for an accredited Health MSc course, I Don't have GBC but later I get my undergrad degree assessed for GBC (whilst I'm enrolled on the course). As I told, I don't yet have the degree and I don't want to miss the deadlines either. therefore, I will soon be making an application on the basis of previous semester results and an expected results letter for the final semester.
So, by getting GBC (on the basis of my non-UK undergrad degree) sometime later in the middle of studying the MSc course, would I be eligible to proceed Or a Conversion MSc program following the completion of specialized MSc would still be needed?

The way Surrey (which is the uni were still talking about) have worded the entry requirements for their Health Psychology MSc, GBC is not required. However, it does seem to be required for their PhD in Health Psychology with Stage 2 Training. If both of those are accurate, then you'd be able to (hopefully) gain GBC via you non-UK degree whilst undertaking the MSc, such that you have it in time for applying for the doctorate. Hence no conversion course would be required.

There's always the risk, however, that the BPS decide that their's some content missing from your non-UK undergraduate degree and opt not to grant you GBC. I don't know how to evaluate how likely that scenario is.

I'd also strongly recommend that you contact Surrey uni to confirm that my reading of those entry requirements are accurate and that this approach will work.
Reply 10
Original post by DataVenia
The way Surrey (which is the uni were still talking about) have worded the entry requirements for their Health Psychology MSc, GBC is not required. However, it does seem to be required for their PhD in Health Psychology with Stage 2 Training. If both of those are accurate, then you'd be able to (hopefully) gain GBC via you non-UK degree whilst undertaking the MSc, such that you have it in time for applying for the doctorate. Hence no conversion course would be required.

There's always the risk, however, that the BPS decide that their's some content missing from your non-UK undergraduate degree and opt not to grant you GBC. I don't know how to evaluate how likely that scenario is.

I'd also strongly recommend that you contact Surrey uni to confirm that my reading of those entry requirements are accurate and that this approach will work.


Yes I will contact them. Thanks A lot.
Original post by zee_99
hi, I have just completed a bachelors degree in psychology outside the UK and as universities in the UK don't offer accredited clinical psychology msc programs I'm unsure about what to do next. I don't want to enroll in conversion programs either. the solution to this that I can think of is what if I opt for an accredited health psychology msc from a university that does not require GBC or conversion course from international applicants and then apply for doctorate in clinical psychology following the completion of accredited health psy msc. if someone could enlighten me on this, it would be really helpful. thanks!

Hi,

I would suggest you check Master's in Health Psychology at De Montfort University then - https://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/courses/postgraduate-courses/health-psychology-mscpg-dippg-cert/health-psychology.aspx

It is a programme that is accredited by BPS and has modules that prepare you for working in the clinical area.

Moreover, Leicester is a highly student-friendly and affordable city.

I am currently in my second year of Psychology course and I must say I am impressed with the level of education at DMU and its career team that offers support in finding and applying for jobs. For example, I am doing a paid internship as a Research Assistant in the Psychology of Language at the university.

I hope you will find it helpful :h:

If you have any further questions, I am more than happy to help!

Take care,

Julia
Original post by De Montfort University
Hi,

I would suggest you check Master's in Health Psychology at De Montfort University then - https://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/courses/postgraduate-courses/health-psychology-mscpg-dippg-cert/health-psychology.aspx

It is a programme that is accredited by BPS and has modules that prepare you for working in the clinical area.

Moreover, Leicester is a highly student-friendly and affordable city.

I am currently in my second year of Psychology course and I must say I am impressed with the level of education at DMU and its career team that offers support in finding and applying for jobs. For example, I am doing a paid internship as a Research Assistant in the Psychology of Language at the university.

I hope you will find it helpful :h:

If you have any further questions, I am more than happy to help!

Take care,

Julia

The entry requirements for De Montfort's Health Psychology MSc, here, include the stipulation that "Applicants are usually expected to possess (or be predicted to obtain) a First or 2:1 award from a BPS-accredited psychology course."

OP took their undergraduate degree abroad and it is not BPS-accredited. In fact, the very title of this thread is, "BPS unaccredited undergrad degree". Do you still think that's gain access to this Health Psychology MSc?
Original post by DataVenia
The entry requirements for De Montfort's Health Psychology MSc, here, include the stipulation that "Applicants are usually expected to possess (or be predicted to obtain) a First or 2:1 award from a BPS-accredited psychology course."

OP took their undergraduate degree abroad and it is not BPS-accredited. In fact, the very title of this thread is, "BPS unaccredited undergrad degree". Do you still think that's gain access to this Health Psychology MSc?

Yes, the key word is "usually".

Moreover, another paragraph clearly states that De Montfort University does not reject student without BPS accreditation "We will consider applications from students with non-Psychology undergraduate awards of 2:1 or above where candidates can justify significant experience in a health context and/or knowledge of health practices, policies and systems".

I can add, from my own experience, that DMU approach each candidate individually.

Thanks,

Julia
Original post by De Montfort University
Yes, the key word is "usually".

Moreover, another paragraph clearly states that De Montfort University does not reject student without BPS accreditation "We will consider applications from students with non-Psychology undergraduate awards of 2:1 or above where candidates can justify significant experience in a health context and/or knowledge of health practices, policies and systems".

I can add, from my own experience, that DMU approach each candidate individually.

Thanks,

Julia

Perfect. Thanks for confirming. :smile:
Reply 15
Hello again, I was curious about two more programs. I was wondering whether there are enough job opportunities for graduates of these programs: A) 2-year BACP-accredited MSc in counselling
B) 1-year unaccredited MSc in psychological therapies
particularly for international students who want to settle in the UK and need to find visa-sponsored jobs for positions as mental health support workers, assistant psychologists, or other related roles as soon as they finish their studies. To remind you of my background, I already hold an MA in psychology (major: clinical psych), which I'm pretty sure will get me the GBC as well. The end goal is to become a clinical psychologist.

If both of these courses open up an equal amount of opportunities for roles as assistant psychologist, Mental health support worker or any other related role , teach almost the same modules, and equip me with knowledge of counselling and psychotherapeutic techniques (which will also be beneficial in the longer course because this is what clinical psychologists use too), wouldn’t it be wise to opt for the one-year course even though it’s not accredited? This way, one year's fees could be saved.

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