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How mathematical is business economics course?

Is the maths in business economics degrees easy in general?
(edited 9 months ago)
Original post by NazifaNawer
Is the maths in business economics degrees easy in general?


It depends on the specific degree, but using a random business economics degree as an example: https://courses.leeds.ac.uk/f835/business-economics-bsc#content

Year 1:
Mathematics and Statistics for Economics and Business 1B (10 credits) & Mathematics and Statistics for Economics and Business 1A (10 credits)
These should cover the essential maths for economics and business. The more difficult maths is in the economics modules as opposed to business, which generally doesn't have maths above GCSE or iGCSE level, but can include bits of AS Level statistics.
The typical topics I would think this module include:

Hypothesis testing

Confidence intervals

Calculus - more so differentiation than anything else

Logarithms - for compounding



Year 2:
Intermediate Microeconomics (10 credits)
Uses applied maths from your first year. Typical topics I would suspect it has include:

Differentiation for utility curves and Cobb-Douglas functions

Logarithms



Statistics and Econometrics (20 credits)

Hypothesis testing

Confidence Intervals

Multiple regressions

All relatively straightforward to understand, but difficult to get right because of the interpretation and wording

Intermediate Macroeconomics (10 credits)
Maths should be relatively straightforward. There might be some abstract maths where you need to know basic differentiation.

Business Economics (10 credits)
Should include relatively straightforward maths e.g. calculating areas/geometry, GCSE level algebra.

Optional: Mathematics for Business and Economics 2 (10 credits)
I can't be sure what this module would contain, but it could be anything from the following:

Difference equations

Differential equations

Matrix calculations

Linear programming


Optional: International Economics (10 credits), Labour Economics (10 credits), Transport Economics (10 credits), Macroeconomic Policy and Performance (10 credits)
Shoudl be relatively straightforward GCSE level maths e.g. arithmetic, geometry

Optional: Project Appraisal (10 credits)
Mostly straightforward GCSE maths (e.g. arithmetic), but includes logarithms because you're dealing with compounding interest/discount rates. Whilst very unlikely, you might cover real options, which you should avoid if you dislike maths because it involves advanced level calculus.

Year 3:
Most of the modules are mostly theoretical and doesn't involve the maths involved in your second year. It doesn't mean it's necessarily easier, because you would require to understand more abstract concepts and debate on the theories a lot more. You are also expected to read a lot more journal articles compared to other years.

Optional: Applied Econometrics (10 credits)

Hypothesis testing

Confidence Intervals

Multiple regressions

All relatively straightforward to understand, but difficult to get right because of the interpretation and wording

Of course, I haven't studied the above, so I am speculating. If someone else has done the above degree, please correct me where I am incorrect.
(edited 9 months ago)
Reply 2
Original post by MindMax2000
It depends on the specific degree, but using a random business economics degree as an example: https://courses.leeds.ac.uk/f835/business-economics-bsc#content

Year 1:
Mathematics and Statistics for Economics and Business 1B (10 credits) & Mathematics and Statistics for Economics and Business 1A (10 credits)
These should cover the essential maths for economics and business. The more difficult maths is in the economics modules as opposed to business, which generally doesn't have maths above GCSE or iGCSE level, but can include bits of AS Level statistics.
The typical topics I would think this module include:

Hypothesis testing

Confidence intervals

Calculus - more so differentiation than anything else

Logarithms - for compounding



Year 2:
Intermediate Microeconomics (10 credits)
Uses applied maths from your first year. Typical topics I would suspect it has include:

Differentiation for utility curves and Cobb-Douglas functions

Logarithms



Statistics and Econometrics (20 credits)

Hypothesis testing

Confidence Intervals

Multiple regressions

All relatively straightforward to understand, but difficult to get right because of the interpretation and wording

Intermediate Macroeconomics (10 credits)
Maths should be relatively straightforward. There might be some abstract maths where you need to know basic differentiation.

Business Economics (10 credits)
Should include relatively straightforward maths e.g. calculating areas/geometry, GCSE level algebra.

Optional: Mathematics for Business and Economics 2 (10 credits)
I can't be sure what this module would contain, but it could be anything from the following:

Difference equations

Differential equations

Matrix calculations

Linear programming


Optional: International Economics (10 credits), Labour Economics (10 credits), Transport Economics (10 credits), Macroeconomic Policy and Performance (10 credits)
Shoudl be relatively straightforward GCSE level maths e.g. arithmetic, geometry

Optional: Project Appraisal (10 credits)
Mostly straightforward GCSE maths (e.g. arithmetic), but includes logarithms because you're dealing with compounding interest/discount rates. Whilst very unlikely, you might cover real options, which you should avoid if you dislike maths because it involves advanced level calculus.

Year 3:
Most of the modules are mostly theoretical and doesn't involve the maths involved in your second year. It doesn't mean it's necessarily easier, because you would require to understand more abstract concepts and debate on the theories a lot more. You are also expected to read a lot more journal articles compared to other years.

Optional: Applied Econometrics (10 credits)

Hypothesis testing

Confidence Intervals

Multiple regressions

All relatively straightforward to understand, but difficult to get right because of the interpretation and wording

Of course, I haven't studied the above, so I am speculating. If someone else has done the above degree, please correct me where I am incorrect.


I think I can apply for business economics, I can handle the maths in this course. Maybe I will apply to Kingston University (BSc) and the University of Liverpool (BA). Any thoughts or opinions on the courses of these 2 unis?
Original post by NazifaNawer
I think I can apply for business economics, I can handle the maths in this course. Maybe I will apply to Kingston University (BSc) and the University of Liverpool (BA). Any thoughts or opinions on the courses of these 2 unis?


I don't have any particular opinions on either universities. I think BenRyan99 would have a better opinion on this than I do.

Having looked through the content for both degrees, I would say the Liverpool degree is less quantiative but it would also have more accounting modules than those from Kingston. Both degrees would still require you to pick up on the following maths topics:

Differentiation

Hypothesis testing

Multiple regressions

Confidence intervals

Logarithms


Both degrees also require most of the maths covered in the first 2 years of the degree, similar to that in the Leed's degree.

I haven't seen the options you get in the Kingston's degree, but from the looks of it Liverpool's degree would provide a wide range of nonquantitative options.
I am not entirely sure why Kingston doesn't require A Level Maths to do the degree because quite a few of the topics would require you to be somewhat proficient in maths (to at least AS Level standard). The maths in Liverpool's degree should be just about manageable if you only have iGCSE level maths.

See:
https://www.kingston.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/business-economics/
https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/courses/2023/business-economics-ba-hons#course-content
Reply 4
Original post by MindMax2000
I don't have any particular opinions on either universities. I think BenRyan99 would have a better opinion on this than I do.

Having looked through the content for both degrees, I would say the Liverpool degree is less quantiative but it would also have more accounting modules than those from Kingston. Both degrees would still require you to pick up on the following maths topics:

Differentiation

Hypothesis testing

Multiple regressions

Confidence intervals

Logarithms


Both degrees also require most of the maths covered in the first 2 years of the degree, similar to that in the Leed's degree.

I haven't seen the options you get in the Kingston's degree, but from the looks of it Liverpool's degree would provide a wide range of nonquantitative options.
I am not entirely sure why Kingston doesn't require A Level Maths to do the degree because quite a few of the topics would require you to be somewhat proficient in maths (to at least AS Level standard). The maths in Liverpool's degree should be just about manageable if you only have iGCSE level maths.

See:
https://www.kingston.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/business-economics/
https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/courses/2023/business-economics-ba-hons#course-content


Oh okay I see. Thank you so much! Your replies were helpful

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