The Student Room Group
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London

LSE Application 2024

Hi,
I am applying to study accounting and finance at LSE. Due to disruptions such as my mum getting mental health problems where she could not attend work and participating in numerous extracurricular activities. I have been predicted an A*AB . I should be eligible for a contextual offer. Would you still recommend for me to apply?
Original post by Anonymous
Hi,
I am applying to study accounting and finance at LSE. Due to disruptions such as my mum getting mental health problems where she could not attend work and participating in numerous extracurricular activities. I have been predicted an A*AB . I should be eligible for a contextual offer. Would you still recommend for me to apply?

Your predicted grades of A*AB exceed to contextual requirements for BSc Accounting and Finance of AAB (assuming you are predicted at least an A in Maths), so you should absolutely apply.

Just note that LSE is very competitive, so even applicants who exceed the entry requirements don't necessary get an offer. So make sure you have some unis / courses amongst your five which are less competitive and/or which have lower entry requirements.
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London
Reply 2
Thank you so much! That would be perfect! I was thinking I had to hit that AAA entry requirement and then the I would be able to get an AAB offer.
Original post by DataVenia
Your predicted grades of A*AB exceed to contextual requirements for BSc Accounting and Finance of AAB (assuming you are predicted at least an A in Maths), so you should absolutely apply.

Just note that LSE is very competitive, so even applicants who exceed the entry requirements don't necessary get an offer. So make sure you have some unis / courses amongst your five which are less competitive and/or which have lower entry requirements.
Original post by Anonymous
Thank you so much! That would be perfect! I was thinking I had to hit that AAA entry requirement and then the I would be able to get an AAB offer.

Well, to be fair, Durham have a slightly confusing two-tiered approach to contextual applications. This is explained (poorly) in the Contextual Admissions section of this page on their web site.

Essentially, then are a series of contextual flags which can be associated with your application (e.g. "the school’s or college’s performance is below the national average" or "a student is known to have been eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) in the previous six years"). Any of these gain you "additional consideration". They may use that information to:

"- to make an applicant a standard offer where the applicant’s academic record (eg, GCSEs/AS levels or equivalent) or personal statement may be marginally less competitive than the cohort overall
- to make an applicant a standard offer where the applicant is predicted marginally below the usual entry requirements
- when making confirmation decisions for offer holders that have marginally failed to meet the entry criteria (usually this means one grade below the standard entry requirements)."

The above is perhaps where you got your "had to hit that AAA entry requirement" from, as the above does not include a grade reduction at the offer stage.

Then, separately, they have contextual offers - which come with a reduced grade requirement. This is available to "students flagged with a home postcode that is classified as POLAR4 Quintile 1 or IMD Quintile 1, as a care leaver, or a participant in a specified LSE WP programme or a Sutton Trust Pathways programme". (Even then, that say such students may be considered for a contextual offer - so they've left themselves some wiggle room.)

So contextual offers are available to a subset of students who have contextual flags.

You've said "I should be eligible for a contextual offer", which presumably means you feel you fit into the second category. Such candidates will have a lower target to hit, in terms of the entry requirement.
Reply 4
Original post by DataVenia
Well, to be fair, Durham have a slightly confusing two-tiered approach to contextual applications. This is explained (poorly) in the Contextual Admissions section of this page on their web site.

Essentially, then are a series of contextual flags which can be associated with your application (e.g. "the school’s or college’s performance is below the national average" or "a student is known to have been eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) in the previous six years"). Any of these gain you "additional consideration". They may use that information to:

"- to make an applicant a standard offer where the applicant’s academic record (eg, GCSEs/AS levels or equivalent) or personal statement may be marginally less competitive than the cohort overall
- to make an applicant a standard offer where the applicant is predicted marginally below the usual entry requirements
- when making confirmation decisions for offer holders that have marginally failed to meet the entry criteria (usually this means one grade below the standard entry requirements)."

The above is perhaps where you got your "had to hit that AAA entry requirement" from, as the above does not include a grade reduction at the offer stage.

Then, separately, they have contextual offers - which come with a reduced grade requirement. This is available to "students flagged with a home postcode that is classified as POLAR4 Quintile 1 or IMD Quintile 1, as a care leaver, or a participant in a specified LSE WP programme or a Sutton Trust Pathways programme". (Even then, that say such students may be considered for a contextual offer - so they've left themselves some wiggle room.)

So contextual offers are available to a subset of students who have contextual flags.

You've said "I should be eligible for a contextual offer", which presumably means you feel you fit into the second category. Such candidates will have a lower target to hit, in terms of the entry requirement.

Thank you so much! That has made so much more sense than the website. I hope many more students can see this explanation!
Original post by Anonymous
Thank you so much! That has made so much more sense than the website. I hope many more students can see this explanation!

Don't worry, they will; 30 TSR users have viewed this thread already (including the two of us). :smile:
Reply 6
Hi,
My son wants to study economics at LSE. He got predicated Maths A*, Economics A, Physics A,Further Maths B. GCSE 7 grade 9 including maths, further maths, economics. 2 grade 8 & 1 grade 7
He is also sitting for TMUA to make his application stinger and has also done senior maths challenge.
Please advise me if he stands a chance for LSE economics as he has predicted grade B in further maths? Thanks
(edited 4 months ago)
Original post by siddak
Hi,
My son wants to study economics at LSE. He got predicated Maths A*, Economics A, Physics A,Further Maths B. GCSE 7 grade 9 including maths, further maths, economics. 2 grade 8 & 1 grade 7
He is also sitting for TMUA to make his application stinger and has also done senior maths challenge.
Please advise me if he stands a chance for LSE economics as he has predicted grade B in further maths? Thanks

He does stand a chance, yes. As you will note on this page on BSc Economics, "If you take four or more full A-levels, you will be expected to achieve A* A A (with A* in Mathematics), and a pass in the fourth A-level." You will note that this is really no different to the "A*AA with an A* in Mathematics" requirement for those studying three A levels.

He will, however, be completing against students who opted to take just three A levels, and used the 25% time saved by doing so to nudge their grades in the remaining subjects up.

Students currently studying BSc Economics at the LSE typically achieved A*AA (source), so it's not like they ask for A*AA but everyone actually achieves A*A*A* minimum, or anything daft like that. So, he stands a chance.

He should be aware that the competition is fierce though, of the 3315 applicants to BSc Economics for 2020/21 entry, only 476 (14.4%) received offers (source; row 539).
Reply 8
Thank you so much for your reply. My son’ school did AS level so they want students to take 4 subjects but you can drop 1 subject in year13. He wanted to drop physics and wants to carry on with maths, FM and economics but he got B in FM that’s why he hasn’t got any choice but to carry on with 4 subjects. He knows that he has to work really hard.
His other uni choices are UCL, bath, Nottingham, Kings,(Warwick he can’t apply now as they want 2 A* predictions).
Do you know anything g about Kings Economics course? Is kings economics is as good as bath?
Just looking 5th place to apply
Original post by siddak
Thank you so much for your reply. My son’ school did AS level so they want students to take 4 subjects but you can drop 1 subject in year13. He wanted to drop physics and wants to carry on with maths, FM and economics but he got B in FM that’s why he hasn’t got any choice but to carry on with 4 subjects. He knows that he has to work really hard.
His other uni choices are UCL, bath, Nottingham, Kings,(Warwick he can’t apply now as they want 2 A* predictions).
Do you know anything g about Kings Economics course? Is kings economics is as good as bath?
Just looking 5th place to apply

We get into dangerous territory with phrases like "as good as bath", as it depends how you're measuring "good". :smile:

I'll throw a few stats at you, and you can decide. These are from a variety of different sources, but are all as published on The Uni Guide here (for Economics at Bath) and here (for Economics at King's).

Percentage of students who agreed with the statement that, "Overall, I am satisfied with the quality of the course" (source: the National Students Survey 2022).
Bath: 77%
Kings: 78%

Percentage of students who achieved a 2:1 or above (source: the Higher Education Statistics Agency, HESA).
Bath: 92%
King's: 91%

Percentage of graduates who, six months after graduating, were "employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial" (source: Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey).
Bath: 82%
King's: 81%

Those all look pretty similar to me. Things do diverge a little when it comes to graduate (and subsequent) incomes.

Average annual salary, six months after having graduated (source: Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey).
Bath: £30,000
King's: £25,000

Median earnings three years after having graduated (source:Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset).
Bath: £45k
King's: £36k

That might suggest that Bath has better connections with industry or better prepares its graduates for the world of work. (Although, as always, correlation is not the same as causation.)
Hello, I am looking for admission for admission to LSE A&F programme. I am a cbse student with predicted score maths- 98, english 94, business studies, 98, accounts- 99, economics- 98 which equals to A*,A,A*,A*,A*. I have also interned at a Top tier CA firm, and two other business. I have also volunteered at a covid hospital for two years and also started a programme that educated over 100 students in financing their education. I also have a diploma from London Institute of B&F but I am having some troubling with my PS I don't think its good enough. If my PS is mid standards what will be my chance of admission to lse
Reply 11
Original post by iamashmitb
Hello, I am looking for admission for admission to LSE A&F programme. I am a cbse student with predicted score maths- 98, english 94, business studies, 98, accounts- 99, economics- 98 which equals to A*,A,A*,A*,A*. I have also interned at a Top tier CA firm, and two other business. I have also volunteered at a covid hospital for two years and also started a programme that educated over 100 students in financing their education. I also have a diploma from London Institute of B&F but I am having some troubling with my PS I don't think its good enough. If my PS is mid standards what will be my chance of admission to lse

PS are very important at LSE, but just one piece of the puzzle. It is clear that academically you will be fine and your super-curriculars are good. Try to embed this in your PS and link it to your course and WHY that makes you want to learn about A&F more. In addition, LSE is a very international university, so maybe show your uniqueness by presenting A&F from your perspective (wherever you come from) and how it differs to others. Hope that helps - fellow LSE applicant
Original post by fg123445
PS are very important at LSE, but just one piece of the puzzle. It is clear that academically you will be fine and your super-curriculars are good. Try to embed this in your PS and link it to your course and WHY that makes you want to learn about A&F more. In addition, LSE is a very international university, so maybe show your uniqueness by presenting A&F from your perspective (wherever you come from) and how it differs to others. Hope that helps - fellow LSE applicant

thanks for the advice, btw which course are you applying offers from
Reply 13
Original post by iamashmitb
thanks for the advice, btw which course are you applying offers from


PPE.
Reply 14
Just go an offer today for the MSc political economy of late development! I’m super excited!

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