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can I get into law with a social science degree?

I do a joint honours in crime and sociology - would I be able to do a masters in law or would a conversion course be more applicable?
Original post by gyahrralist
I do a joint honours in crime and sociology - would I be able to do a masters in law or would a conversion course be more applicable?


More than likely you would need to do a conversion course before you can do an LLM. You can do an MA in law though.

Just out of interest, what do you intend to do after your degree? If you intend to become a solicitor, you won't need a law degree and you can go straight in via SQE as you are. If you intend to become a barrister, then you would only need the conversion course (PGDL).
The master's degree is appropriate should you wish to either teach in law or become a law academic.
Reply 2
Original post by MindMax2000
More than likely you would need to do a conversion course before you can do an LLM. You can do an MA in law though.

Just out of interest, what do you intend to do after your degree? If you intend to become a solicitor, you won't need a law degree and you can go straight in via SQE as you are. If you intend to become a barrister, then you would only need the conversion course (PGDL).
The master's degree is appropriate should you wish to either teach in law or become a law academic.

thanks for the response, I was thinking of becoming a paralegal or solicitor. I didn't know whether I could immediately train to become a solicitor.
(edited 5 months ago)
Original post by gyahrralist
I do a joint honours in crime and sociology - would I be able to do a masters in law or would a conversion course be more applicable?


Hi @gyahrralist!

It really depends on the career you want in law. If it is along the lines of a paralegal or a court clerk etc. then no degree is required but sometimes a different qualification (court clerks have their own diploma-based requirements). Equally, if you want to become a solicitor the route of entry is currently changing so that a degree in law is not required. If you would like to still do a conversion course to become a solicitor and obtain a TC or equivalent, then the conversion course is certainly not yet outdated as a way into this profession but it is important to note that it is changing. If you want to become a barrister then you still need a legal degree in order to do the BPC. I would recommend a PGDL or MA Law (conversion) over a multiple year traditional Masters if it is vocational reasons that are currently informing your decision to do another degree qualification.

I hope this helps and good luck :smile:

Sophie
During your degree apply to law firms for a training contract (and vac scheme) and if one hires you they will pay for your law conversion and SQE course and exams - but they recruit years and years ahead so look at their websites to find out deadlines.
Reply 6
Original post by gyahrralist
I do a joint honours in crime and sociology - would I be able to do a masters in law or would a conversion course be more applicable?

Hey!

I think that doing a conversion course would be better because in order to pursue a career as a solicitor this will be required by law firms even though the SRA does not require it anymore. If you choose to go for the bar, the conversion course is required to gain entry to the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC).

For law firms, you could try to apply for vacation schemes and training contracts to secure a role with them so that they financially support you for the PgDL and the SQE. To get a TC, you will need to write very good applications which detail your interest in commercial law and why you want to join that firm. Try to attend as many law firm events so that you discover the firm's work and culture and see whether it appeals to you. Commercial Law Academy provides a course on law firm profiles which could help you distinguish between the different law firms that are out there.

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